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Forums - Sales Discussion - Why are Nintendo Switch sales peaking much later than other Nintendo consoles?

Let's take the Wii, since people like to still insist the Switch will follow a similar path despite being totally different and trending nothing like it.

By this point in Wii's lifespan it had already had its price cut to $200 and pretty much all its big games were behind it. Switch by contrast still costs $300 for the base model, having yet to see a price cut, and still has megatons like BOTW2, Splatoon 3, Monster Hunter Rise, and likely many other big games we don't even know about yet still to come.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

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curl-6 said:

Let's take the Wii, since people like to still insist the Switch will follow a similar path despite being totally different and trending nothing like it.

By this point in Wii's lifespan it had already had its price cut to $200 and pretty much all its big games were behind it. Switch by contrast still costs $300 for the base model, having yet to see a price cut, and still has megatons like BOTW2, Splatoon 3, Monster Hunter Rise, and likely many other big games we don't even know about yet still to come.

To add to your point, Wii in Year 5 (December 2010-November 2011) received another $50 dollar price cut that reduced the price down to $150, and changed the bundled game to Mario Kart Wii. This year was also had a very dry lineup of games. Additionally, Nintendo was announcing their next gen console at E3 this year.

Juxtapose this with the upcoming 5th year of the Switch having a decent FP lineup for Q1, and a steller TP lineup for Q1, and the Wii and the Switch couldn't be more different.



1. The pandemic
2. The pandemic
3. The pandemic

It doesn't take a lot of effort to look precisely at which month of 2020 sales and internet trends of the Switch started to skyrocket.

If predecessor interest was a factor then the Wii and the DS would have their sales pattern swapped around.



 

 

 

 

 

haxxiy said:

1. The pandemic
2. The pandemic
3. The pandemic

It doesn't take a lot of effort to look precisely at which month of 2020 sales and internet trends of the Switch started to skyrocket.

If predecessor interest was a factor then the Wii and the DS would have their sales pattern swapped around.

Yeah, no, the pandemic is just one  contributing factor of many, not at all solely responsible.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

curl-6 said:

Let's take the Wii, since people like to still insist the Switch will follow a similar path despite being totally different and trending nothing like it.

By this point in Wii's lifespan it had already had its price cut to $200 and pretty much all its big games were behind it. Switch by contrast still costs $300 for the base model, having yet to see a price cut, and still has megatons like BOTW2, Splatoon 3, Monster Hunter Rise, and likely many other big games we don't even know about yet still to come.

I keep thinking something alone the lines of "oh, but the the Wii was still getting games like Mario Galaxy 2 and Skyward Sword at this point!" ... then I remember that the Switch is actually approaching it's fifth year (March 2021 - March 2022) not it's fourth. Gosh, it makes me feel both old and it also makes the Switch feel weirdly young given how immature it's software lineup still feels. It just highlights all the more how weird it must have been as a Wii owner having the Wii for only about 4 years, only to stop receiving a plethora of games for it. 

Yea ... it actually is kind of weird how, for better or worse, Switch's library doesn't even feel half done yet.  



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AngryLittleAlchemist said:
curl-6 said:

Let's take the Wii, since people like to still insist the Switch will follow a similar path despite being totally different and trending nothing like it.

By this point in Wii's lifespan it had already had its price cut to $200 and pretty much all its big games were behind it. Switch by contrast still costs $300 for the base model, having yet to see a price cut, and still has megatons like BOTW2, Splatoon 3, Monster Hunter Rise, and likely many other big games we don't even know about yet still to come.

I keep thinking something alone the lines of "oh, but the the Wii was still getting games like Mario Galaxy 2 and Skyward Sword at this point!" ... then I remember that the Switch is actually approaching it's fifth year (March 2021 - March 2022) not it's fourth. Gosh, it makes me feel both old and it also makes the Switch feel weirdly young given how immature it's software lineup still feels. It just highlights all the more how weird it must have been as a Wii owner having the Wii for only about 4 years, only to stop receiving a plethora of games for it. 

Yea ... it actually is kind of weird how, for better or worse, Switch's library doesn't even feel half done yet.  

Yeah Switch definitely feels younger than is it, I think because there are still so many major games still ahead of it.

And yes, as a Wii owner, it really sucked how support dried up in its fifth year. Thank fuck there were still a few final gems like Xenoblade and The Last Story to keep me going. All the same, it left a bitter taste, and I'm glad Switch doesn't look to be headed for the same fate.

Last edited by curl-6 - on 21 February 2021

Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

Wii also only had one thing going for it. A novelty. Novelties wear off. The switch has a practical use for its selling point. It's convenient having the ability to be both docked and handheld. As HDTVs became more common and Smartphones the less sense Wii made. Switch released just before the cloud gaming boom and it's more practical than cloud gaming IMO. I'm not saying this is the sole factor. Just an additional one to what has already been mentioned.



Bite my shiny metal cockpit!

curl-6 said:
AngryLittleAlchemist said:

I keep thinking something alone the lines of "oh, but the the Wii was still getting games like Mario Galaxy 2 and Skyward Sword at this point!" ... then I remember that the Switch is actually approaching it's fifth year (March 2021 - March 2022) not it's fourth. Gosh, it makes me feel both old and it also makes the Switch feel weirdly young given how immature it's software lineup still feels. It just highlights all the more how weird it must have been as a Wii owner having the Wii for only about 4 years, only to stop receiving a plethora of games for it. 

Yea ... it actually is kind of weird how, for better or worse, Switch's library doesn't even feel half done yet.  

Yeah Switch definitely feels younger than is it, I think because there are still so many major games still ahead of it.

And yes, as a Wii owner, it really sucked how support dried up in its fifth year. Thank fuck there were still a few final gems like Xenoblade and The Last Story to keep me going. All the same, it left a bitter taste, and I'm glad Switch doesn't look to be headed for the same fate.

It's especially sad because, just looking at 2010 as someone who was too young at the time to play a shit ton of games (and was pretty much just using the Wii as a party machine), it seems surprisingly packed. Kirby, the revival of Donkey Kong Country with Returns, No More Heroes 2, Mario Galaxy 2, the Monster Hunter Tri localization in the west, as well as Red Steel 2 and Sonic Colors. It is the year where you kind of see the sheen wear off perhaps (Metroid Other M, Epic Mickey, Wii Party from what I remember being received as one of the worst Wii-entry games while still selling well), and maybe it showed the Wii wasn't sustainable I don't know. But it seems like a pretty good year for output honestly. 



AngryLittleAlchemist said:
curl-6 said:

Yeah Switch definitely feels younger than is it, I think because there are still so many major games still ahead of it.

And yes, as a Wii owner, it really sucked how support dried up in its fifth year. Thank fuck there were still a few final gems like Xenoblade and The Last Story to keep me going. All the same, it left a bitter taste, and I'm glad Switch doesn't look to be headed for the same fate.

It's especially sad because, just looking at 2010 as someone who was too young at the time to play a shit ton of games (and was pretty much just using the Wii as a party machine), it seems surprisingly packed. Kirby, the revival of Donkey Kong Country with Returns, No More Heroes 2, Mario Galaxy 2, the Monster Hunter Tri localization in the west, as well as Red Steel 2 and Sonic Colors. It is the year where you kind of see the sheen wear off perhaps (Metroid Other M, Epic Mickey, Wii Party from what I remember being received as one of the worst Wii-entry games while still selling well), and maybe it showed the Wii wasn't sustainable I don't know. But it seems like a pretty good year for output honestly. 

Oh yeah 2010 was fantastic, I bought like 12 Wii games from that year alone. It was 2011 when things dried up overnight.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

01. The concept of the console is something never seen before (not like THIS), because of that it took some years for the hybrid concept to explode.
02. Nintendo is focusing on one system instead of 2 this time
03. COVID