Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Monolith Soft had 70 employees in 2011. They now have 243

Can we please not turn this whole thread into quibbling over semantics?

Last edited by curl-6 - on 22 March 2020

Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series X will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

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Wyrdness said:
Jumpin said:

Although what you described IS a remaster.

The intention of a remaster is to update a game for a new generation. It is basically the replacement of old assets such as outdated code/engines and art, but replicating the original experience as closely as possible.

A Remake is a completely new game based on the old one, and while it may follow most or all of the scenarios and redo scenes, it's mainly doing this as a homage to the original, and doesn't aim to replicate the old experience as a game. Remakes include new design, new direction, and occasionally a new genre. Examples of remakes include Goldeneye 007 Remake, Resident Evil Remake, and Final Fantasy 7 Remake.

What you just did here is mix up Remakes, Remasters and Reboots because the industry mixes up terms when they like, Goldeneye and FFVIIR are reboots as they go down a different direction to the original games, XBC and RE are remakes because they remake the original game while staying true to it even if its the same a remake doesn't have to be different from the original. A remaster has always been just a port of the original version to a modern console with little changes other than slight touch ups an example being TLOU on PS4 or RE3 on Dreamcast where it's the same version just on a newer platform.

Just to expand on this, a Remaster reuses everything from the original release, the engine, the assets, everything. It just reduces or removes the compression on audio files, textures, and the like to give it a much cleaner sound and look.

A Remake, as the name implies, remakes the game in a new engine, and generally all the other assets (save maybe soundfiles, especially speech if the original actors are not available anymore) are recreated from scratch, but otherwise keeps everything like in the original.

A Reboot is when one remakes a game and then goes off on tangents where the original didn't go. This may be just to fill plot holes from the original, but also to tell a different story or bring a different outcome at the end. It may also be used to fill more stuff into the game that hasn't been there originally, but that part doesn't influence the main story.

As such, FFVIIR is more a reboot than a remake, but with one clear distinction I left out: A reboot means you build further titles around that game, as it stops the original story and restarts it with this newer version. And here we'll have to see what SE will do with it and the countless spinoffs of FF VII



curl-6 said:
Leynos said:
They now have 3 studios I think. They had two for a while. Kyoto and Tokyo. Kyoto worked on Nintendo games like Zelda and Mario Kart while Tokyo did Xenoblade. Now I wonder if the 3rd is working on the Xenoblade Remake or is that the main studio? My hope is Tokyo is working on that medieval RPG they teased forever ago. I adore Xenoblade but I do want to see them create other new IPs

Same here, as much as I like both Monolith Soft and Xenoblade, I want to see something different and fresh from them next.

And apparently they have 4 studios now.

I can hardly wait, that game they were teasing sounds like a medevil fantasy action/rpg so I hope we hear something soon about it!



Wyrdness said:
Jumpin said:

Although what you described IS a remaster.

The intention of a remaster is to update a game for a new generation. It is basically the replacement of old assets such as outdated code/engines and art, but replicating the original experience as closely as possible.

A Remake is a completely new game based on the old one, and while it may follow most or all of the scenarios and redo scenes, it's mainly doing this as a homage to the original, and doesn't aim to replicate the old experience as a game. Remakes include new design, new direction, and occasionally a new genre. Examples of remakes include Goldeneye 007 Remake, Resident Evil Remake, and Final Fantasy 7 Remake.

What you just did here is mix up Remakes, Remasters and Reboots because the industry mixes up terms when they like, Goldeneye and FFVIIR are reboots as they go down a different direction to the original games, XBC and RE are remakes because they remake the original game while staying true to it even if its the same a remake doesn't have to be different from the original. A remaster has always been just a port of the original version to a modern console with little changes other than slight touch ups an example being TLOU on PS4 or RE3 on Dreamcast where it's the same version just on a newer platform.

This.



My (locked) thread about how difficulty should be a decision for the developers, not the gamers.

https://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/thread.php?id=241866&page=1

I really hope their next project is a new ip with a turn based battle system. I know they can make a game that can wow me and xenoblade 2 was already close enough



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Jumpin said:
Leynos said:

Not a remaster. It's a remake. Using the new engine from Torna and everything is new assets. The geometry is different and so are the models plus they added in the deleted area and it looks remodeled. It is a remake.

Although what you described IS a remaster.

The intention of a remaster is to update a game for a new generation. It is basically the replacement of old assets such as outdated code/engines and art, but replicating the original experience as closely as possible.

A Remake is a completely new game based on the old one, and while it may follow most or all of the scenarios and redo scenes, it's mainly doing this as a homage to the original, and doesn't aim to replicate the old experience as a game. Remakes include new design, new direction, and occasionally a new genre. Examples of remakes include Goldeneye 007 Remake, Resident Evil Remake, and Final Fantasy 7 Remake.

JFC. A remaster is cleaning up existing assets. A remaster is Final Fantasy XII Zodiac edition. A remake is Shadow of the Colossus on PS4. A Remake is creating new assets and building on it. That's what this is. It's a remake. New assets. New Engine. New Story elements. New areas. Remake.  Xenoblade on Switch is a remake. It's not recycling any assets.

You are confusing remake with reimagining. FF7R is a reimagining/reboot, not a remake. New assets yea but also new combat system and a ton added and some taken out for this new version. It's a different take on an old story. Dumbass marketing has fucked up the terms. Xenoblade is telling the same story with remade assets.

Last edited by Leynos - on 22 March 2020

Bite my shiny metal cockpit!

Wyrdness said:
Jumpin said:

Although what you described IS a remaster.

The intention of a remaster is to update a game for a new generation. It is basically the replacement of old assets such as outdated code/engines and art, but replicating the original experience as closely as possible.

A Remake is a completely new game based on the old one, and while it may follow most or all of the scenarios and redo scenes, it's mainly doing this as a homage to the original, and doesn't aim to replicate the old experience as a game. Remakes include new design, new direction, and occasionally a new genre. Examples of remakes include Goldeneye 007 Remake, Resident Evil Remake, and Final Fantasy 7 Remake.

What you just did here is mix up Remakes, Remasters and Reboots because the industry mixes up terms when they like, Goldeneye and FFVIIR are reboots as they go down a different direction to the original games, XBC and RE are remakes because they remake the original game while staying true to it even if its the same a remake doesn't have to be different from the original. A remaster has always been just a port of the original version to a modern console with little changes other than slight touch ups an example being TLOU on PS4 or RE3 on Dreamcast where it's the same version just on a newer platform.

No. A reboot is the restart of series or franchise and discards the continuity in order to create an entirely new one; that's something completely different from a remake. An example of a reboot would be Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

A port with small enhancements or additional content is actually just called a port; sometimes an enhanced port to acknowledge the enhancements. Skies of Arcadia Legends, for example, is a port despite all the new content, graphical touch ups, and gameplay tweaks.

A remaster is a new edition that replaces outdated assets and codework/engines in order to bring an existing game to a new generation. This is what Xenoblade Chronicles Definitive Edition is. Just because it's a more extensive remaster than other remasters does not suddenly make it something completely different.

A remake is a new take on the same story. It's not just an asset swap or a code/engine update, it's an entirely new design which attempts to recapture the original, but not replicate it. A current trend in film is live action remakes of animated films, this is a good illustration for what a game remake is because the macro-concept is directly translatable between the two industries. "Final Fantasy Remake" fits the definition of a remake to a T.

Leynos said:

FF7R is a reimagining/reboot,

Well, what is it, a re-imaging or a reboot? A reimagining is not a type of reboot, it's a type of remake. It differs from a standard remake by creating a new franchise or universe; characters, and everything. Xenoblade Chronicles can be considered a reimagining of Xenogears since the game, on the bare bones conceptual level, is based on Xenogears with much of the plot points being remade. But by far the most prominent example of a reimagining is Star Wars vs The Hidden Fortress, and that is the best way to illustrate the term.

A big clue that Xenoblade Chronicles Definitive Edition is a remaster is the definitive edition written right into its title. The same thing can be said about Final Fantasy 7 Remake.

What you are trying to do is to use semantical fan logic to redefine well-established industry terminology in order to elevate something beyond what it actually is, like the whole "Metroid is an RPG because you play the role of Samus." In the end, it's an exercise in pretentiousness.

And Curl-6, my sincerest apologies for continuing the derail over someone's fanboy nitpick of one of my posts. But I suffer from German cultural flaws, like arguing about trivial details.

Last edited by Jumpin - on 22 March 2020

I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

I really can't wait to see what they do next (new project-wise). They seemed to have ironed out their engine with "Torna", and XC3 should be amazing!



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For a point of comparison, when Monolith Soft were first formed as a studio, they numbered 40 people.

So they are now more than 6 times their original size. Being acquired by Nintendo certainly seems to have worked out well for them.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series X will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

Amazing the investment Nintendo has put into them. It appears they are trying to grow them to have at least 3 teams. 2 for original games and 1 for 'support purposes'



     

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