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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Nintendos holiday 2020

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People made a good point here

In past Nintendo had 2/3 systems to support at the same time at the handhelds were usually the most successful of the bunch, now they only have one

Sure, some can argue portable games are less demanding to develop than home console games, but so are those ports/remasters



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It's mediocre, but with everything that has been going on I can't blame them.



You know it deserves the GOTY.

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IcaroRibeiro said:
People made a good point here

In past Nintendo had 2/3 systems to support at the same time at the handhelds were usually the most successful of the bunch, now they only have one

Sure, some can argue portable games are less demanding to develop than home console games, but so are those ports/remasters

Yea this is something that's undeniably a little disappointing, the combination of teams didn't really lead to more games from a streamlined process, it just feels like one console gets the same amount of games as a 3DS + Wii U combination, which by itself is a pretty good proposition, except I'm not even sure if that's necessarily true (because I think for example only having Animal Crossing on one system might push Nintendo to need a system seller for the other system not getting a new Animal Crossing, and also the lower system specs of the 3DS allowed for games to be turned out quicker).

That thread from long ago that specifically said that the streamlining of game development wouldn't lead to more games but rather just help develop more ambitious HD titles was spot-on, which makes it a little bit harder to swallow that some games have gotten delayed a lot, or have taken a while to come out from initial reveal. 

At the same time I'm not in denial, I know this will probably lead to a much better second half for the consoles lifespan. From what I remember (and I could be wrong) the 3DS post 2014 was a little barebones, you did have some years that were pretty close to great (like 2016 with Pokemon and Fire Emblem and Monster Hunter Generations, although even then that would be dependent on if you lived in the West or not, and Generations wasn't huge in the West), but at the same time it was obvious that both the 3DS and Wii U suffered from having original titles because Nintendo was gearing for their next system. In contrast, 2021 will probably be one of their best years, and while I don't think that will be true for 2023, 2022 should at least have some big original releases, giving it 2 pretty damn good years near the end of it's life. 



AngryLittleAlchemist said:
IcaroRibeiro said:
People made a good point here

In past Nintendo had 2/3 systems to support at the same time at the handhelds were usually the most successful of the bunch, now they only have one

Sure, some can argue portable games are less demanding to develop than home console games, but so are those ports/remasters

Yea this is something that's undeniably a little disappointing, the combination of teams didn't really lead to more games from a streamlined process, it just feels like one console gets the same amount of games as a 3DS + Wii U combination, which by itself is a pretty good proposition, except I'm not even sure if that's necessarily true (because I think for example only having Animal Crossing on one system might push Nintendo to need a system seller for the other system not getting a new Animal Crossing, and also the lower system specs of the 3DS allowed for games to be turned out quicker).

That thread from long ago that specifically said that the streamlining of game development wouldn't lead to more games but rather just help develop more ambitious HD titles was spot-on, which makes it a little bit harder to swallow that some games have gotten delayed a lot, or have taken a while to come out from initial reveal. 

At the same time I'm not in denial, I know this will probably lead to a much better second half for the consoles lifespan. From what I remember (and I could be wrong) the 3DS post 2014 was a little barebones, you did have some years that were pretty close to great (like 2016 with Pokemon and Fire Emblem and Monster Hunter Generations, although even then that would be dependent on if you lived in the West or not, and Generations wasn't huge in the West), but at the same time it was obvious that both the 3DS and Wii U suffered from having original titles because Nintendo was gearing for their next system. In contrast, 2021 will probably be one of their best years, and while I don't think that will be true for 2023, 2022 should at least have some big original releases, giving it 2 pretty damn good years near the end of it's life. 

Good to see that reality settles in. I always found it weird that people jumped to the conclusion that consolidation of home console and handheld software development would result in greater software output overall when at the same time development times for individual titles were bound to increase (an NX game takes more effort than a 3DS game, obviously). Wii U and 3DS was the generation where it stopped working for Nintendo, so both systems suffered from first party software droughts at various points in their respective lifes. But the same amount of software concentrated on one platform would have been fine and Switch demonstrates that it is.

Now the next step is for people at large to realize that the expectation of a Switch successor in 2022 or 2023 is nuts. It already takes a long time to complete development of high profile software, so pushing for even more powerful hardware as soon as possible doesn't make sense. Especially when you consider the current situation where both the Zelda team and EAD Tokyo are very likely to get out their latest games in 2021, so four years after their first Switch games. Nintendo would not be close to ready for a new platform launch in 2022 or 2023.



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RolStoppable said:
AngryLittleAlchemist said:

Yea this is something that's undeniably a little disappointing, the combination of teams didn't really lead to more games from a streamlined process, it just feels like one console gets the same amount of games as a 3DS + Wii U combination, which by itself is a pretty good proposition, except I'm not even sure if that's necessarily true (because I think for example only having Animal Crossing on one system might push Nintendo to need a system seller for the other system not getting a new Animal Crossing, and also the lower system specs of the 3DS allowed for games to be turned out quicker).

That thread from long ago that specifically said that the streamlining of game development wouldn't lead to more games but rather just help develop more ambitious HD titles was spot-on, which makes it a little bit harder to swallow that some games have gotten delayed a lot, or have taken a while to come out from initial reveal. 

At the same time I'm not in denial, I know this will probably lead to a much better second half for the consoles lifespan. From what I remember (and I could be wrong) the 3DS post 2014 was a little barebones, you did have some years that were pretty close to great (like 2016 with Pokemon and Fire Emblem and Monster Hunter Generations, although even then that would be dependent on if you lived in the West or not, and Generations wasn't huge in the West), but at the same time it was obvious that both the 3DS and Wii U suffered from having original titles because Nintendo was gearing for their next system. In contrast, 2021 will probably be one of their best years, and while I don't think that will be true for 2023, 2022 should at least have some big original releases, giving it 2 pretty damn good years near the end of it's life. 

Good to see that reality settles in. I always found it weird that people jumped to the conclusion that consolidation of home console and handheld software development would result in greater software output overall when at the same time development times for individual titles were bound to increase (an NX game takes more effort than a 3DS game, obviously). Wii U and 3DS was the generation where it stopped working for Nintendo, so both systems suffered from first party software droughts at various points in their respective lifes. But the same amount of software concentrated on one platform would have been fine and Switch demonstrates that it is.

Now the next step is for people at large to realize that the expectation of a Switch successor in 2022 or 2023 is nuts. It already takes a long time to complete development of high profile software, so pushing for even more powerful hardware as soon as possible doesn't make sense. Especially when you consider the current situation where both the Zelda team and EAD Tokyo are very likely to get out their latest games in 2021, so four years after their first Switch games. Nintendo would not be close to ready for a new platform launch in 2022 or 2023.

Oh I've known that for a while now to be fair, probably since after 2018. 

I could see 2023, but I would hope for 2024, as I think there's still quite a bit of life left in the Switch, and with the way technology progresses I think waiting it out as long as possible while still maintaining high demand is smart. 2022 just sounds fucking insane, and would be beyond stupid from Nintendo too. 



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Well, I think the pandemic ended up changing their plans a little.
I imagine that the big holiday title (the one that release around november 20) would be Super mario 3D world, that appeals 2D and 3D plataformer mario audience, and would just fit with the sales-wise importance of the date.
Make more sense than Hyrule warriors, a usually niche game (that will end up being the best selling musou ever).

However the pandemic just pushed the 3d world development to next year. It would be a top notch holiday season if it was not delayed.



It's not a very good holiday lineup, for sure, though Hyrule Warriors got me pretty excited (never thought I'd be writing these words). Either way, I can't blame them, it's been a rough year for everyone. Personally, I wasn't really expecting anything, when I realized the pandemic was gonna be a long-term thing I kinda just accepted that everything that's being made gets delayed for a year, anything that comes out before that is a bonus.



I was hoping for Mario Odyssey 2 as the big holiday title, but it seems unlikely now that 3D All Stars was delayed from spring to now (would be too many Mario games coming out I guess). Will we get another double release for Zelda and Mario next year like in 2017 (Game of the Year battle would be on again). Odyssey 2 hasn't been confirmed, I'm just really hoping for it (and there might be hints, such as Isla Delfino being removed from the Odyssey 1 map).



With all the pent up demand Switch has accumulated throughout the year, it will sell like crack-laced hotcakes these Christmas season even without a Smash/Pokemon tier holiday title.

For me personally, Age of Calamity in conjunction with third party titles like Doom Eternal and Fenyx Rising are enough for me to consider it a good holiday quarter. Mario Kart Live also looks like it could be fun.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

AngryLittleAlchemist said:

Yea this is something that's undeniably a little disappointing, the combination of teams didn't really lead to more games from a streamlined process, it just feels like one console gets the same amount of games as a 3DS + Wii U combination, which by itself is a pretty good proposition, except I'm not even sure if that's necessarily true (because I think for example only having Animal Crossing on one system might push Nintendo to need a system seller for the other system not getting a new Animal Crossing, and also the lower system specs of the 3DS allowed for games to be turned out quicker).

That thread from long ago that specifically said that the streamlining of game development wouldn't lead to more games but rather just help develop more ambitious HD titles was spot-on, which makes it a little bit harder to swallow that some games have gotten delayed a lot, or have taken a while to come out from initial reveal. 

At the same time I'm not in denial, I know this will probably lead to a much better second half for the consoles lifespan. From what I remember (and I could be wrong) the 3DS post 2014 was a little barebones, you did have some years that were pretty close to great (like 2016 with Pokemon and Fire Emblem and Monster Hunter Generations, although even then that would be dependent on if you lived in the West or not, and Generations wasn't huge in the West), but at the same time it was obvious that both the 3DS and Wii U suffered from having original titles because Nintendo was gearing for their next system. In contrast, 2021 will probably be one of their best years, and while I don't think that will be true for 2023, 2022 should at least have some big original releases, giving it 2 pretty damn good years near the end of it's life. 

Yeah anybody who thought we would see a significant increase in the overall amount of Nintendo games was niave, the point of unifying was that they were no longer able to adequately support 2 seperate systems at once.

A 3DS successor would likely have had Vita level specs while a Wii U successor would likely have had PS4/XBO level specs at which point you would see both systems suffer from regular droughts and a continued decline in both their handheld and console markets.

Instead of having 2 systems with mediocre support, they are able to have a single system with great support.



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