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Forums - General Discussion - Should schools reopen?

 

Should schools reopen?

Yes 9 13.04%
 
Yes but blended model 12 17.39%
 
No 48 69.57%
 
Total:69
Nighthawk117 said:
Let them open....I don't give a shit. However, I don't mind them being closed - because I hate seeing shitty ass school buses on the road slowing me down!

wow you are very edgy



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shikamaru317 said:
mZuzek said:

yikes

Not really. She attends school in a small city in a rural county, new cases are at a crawl here right now. I think they're taking the right precautions for re-opening, first day they even have a special class to hammer in the importance of wearing masks at all times while at school, and the importance of staying home and calling in sick if you exhibit any possible Covid symptoms. That plus the hybrid model should be good enough for my area. The decision to stay closed or re-open was actually voted on by the parents, and the vast majority voted to re-open, unsurprising as many are 2 income families and can neither afford for one parent to not work nor afford a babysitter. 

Obviously it should be up to each school district to decide, opening might not be the best decision in the larger cities or other areas that are still seeing big spike in new cases. But kids that do continue to distance learn are definitely going to have alot of catching up to do before SAT's and college applications and such. 

I wish my school district would be more responsible... we are opening up business as usual... in the middle of Salt Lake City... which is a pretty big metropolitan area with surging cases right now...

honestly, I feel like we are going to be shut down sometime in September... which drives me even more nuts.  A sudden shut down is so much worse than starting out with distance learning, or doing a blended model to minimize the risks... but nope... full go...



Nighthawk117 said:
Let them open....I don't give a shit. However, I don't mind them being closed - because I hate seeing shitty ass school buses on the road slowing me down!

Well aren’t you just a bundle of empathy...



This may be better suited for the Covid thread but we'll see how it goes.

At any rate it really depends on the area. What makes sense in a rural community with packed classrooms may not make sense in a densely populated urban setting.



NightlyPoe said:
Captain_Yuri said:
Nah, we have the technology to have people stay at home and learn that way until the vaccine gets released.

No technology exists that is remotely as effective as in-person instruction for teaching students and ensuring engagement.  And, until we start downloading skills straight into our brains Matrix-style, it's unlikely such a technology will ever be developed.

Metallox said:

I'm certain anyone in the health sector could tell you they could still be a significant vector of the disease, enough to hamper all the effort that has been done against it.

Not really.  Young children haven't been found to make much of a difference in spreading the disease.  Middle and high schools might be a tougher call, but there's really no reason even hesitate for elementary schools beyond commonsense precautions.

The return of children to schools also inevitably means more movement of adults. 

This is true.  However, we can mitigate the spread among adults.  Particularly since the average class only has a single adult within it.  Instructing children certainly qualifies as an essential job if anything does.

Still, you bring a good point with the social development of children. Even then, we should at least give time until the end of the year to see how much things improve. 

If we wait until January, that will be 9 1/2 months without schooling.  That's a LONG time to set kids back.

Yep... however you cant just ignore reality.
Reality is theres a deadly virus out there, that kills like 1% of the people it infects, and which might need to reach 70% infection of population to hit herd immunity (if its even possible at all).

What about all the people (kids included) that get sick, dont die, but get brain damage? Heart damage? lunge damage? kidney damage?
They might only be sick for a short time, but afterwards they 'll have to live the rest of their lives with permanent damage to their bodies from this virus.

50%+ of even the mild/asymptomatic cases, have permanent lunge damage (to some degree).

Also, kids will bring the virus back home.
When that happends, you'll accellerate the spread in the community.
If your grandparents live with you, your basically gambleing with their lives.


Yes its a long time, for kids to go without schooling.

However USA is at risk of spread being so high, you need to shut down again (entire country).
That 'll in-turn cost jobs, and make more people homeless (theres soon to be 28million people, from the first shutdown).
Can your society handle another shutdown, because you guys kept spreading the virus?

Its a trade off, send kids back to school, and you likely make it a sure fire thing, you need another shutdown a few months from now.



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NightlyPoe said:
JRPGfan said:

Yep... however you cant just ignore reality.

I'm not ignoring reality.  I'm dealing with the situation as it exists.  If kids were becoming sick or spreading the disease at a high rate, that would be one thing.  But the spread among young children is very low.  That's been the single lucky break we've gotten from this disease.

As it stands, the dangers of not educating a whole generation of children outweigh the benefits of keeping them home.  Those consequences are permanent as well and will become greater and greater as the time out of school extends outward.

Kids from age 1-9 dont spread as much as adults (a tiny bit less, but they still spread it as well).
Older kids do, ones ages 10 and up. They spread the virus as much as adult do.

Schools are gonna be a mass spread risk, worse than bars & resturants.
Your kids will come back and pass the virus onto their parents.

Its not "very low", ages 10 and up its same as a adult.
Also if you asked military, to gather for 8hours to discuss something in a small building room, where they needed to  be 30-40 people, and had no ventilation. They would tell you, its unsafe, and instead do the meeting via PC's and online (to avoid getting everyone infected).

Soldiers wouldnt do what your asking kids to, because its "unsafe" and not nessary.

*edit: Source :  https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/18/health/coronavirus-children-schools.html

They did a study on it.
Its basically not true that kids dont spread it as much as adults do.



NightlyPoe said:
JRPGfan said:

Yep... however you cant just ignore reality.

I'm not ignoring reality.  I'm dealing with the situation as it exists.  If kids were becoming sick or spreading the disease at a high rate, that would be one thing.  But the spread among young children is very low.  That's been the single lucky break we've gotten from this disease.

As it stands, the dangers of not educating a whole generation of children outweigh the benefits of keeping them home.  Those consequences are permanent as well and will become greater and greater as the time out of school extends outward.

I don't get this point. It's not like kids aren't ever going to school. If the entire education system is delayed by one year, children won't suddenly become dumb forever because they stayed home for a year and are going to finish school aged 18 instead of 17. Nothing changes, like, at all.



NightlyPoe said:
JRPGfan said:

Yep... however you cant just ignore reality.

I'm not ignoring reality.  I'm dealing with the situation as it exists.  If kids were becoming sick or spreading the disease at a high rate, that would be one thing.  But the spread among young children is very low.  That's been the single lucky break we've gotten from this disease.

As it stands, the dangers of not educating a whole generation of children outweigh the benefits of keeping them home.  Those consequences are permanent as well and will become greater and greater as the time out of school extends outward.

While it has been shown that elementary aged kids are less likely to get it or spread it, those studies also don’t account for a school setting.  The fact is, the points of contact and spread are exponentially higher in a school setting then what kids are currently exposed to.  Even elementary kids will get it and spread it, just like other viruses.  

middle and high school kids are really the main concern here though. They are just as susceptible as adults.  They will be moving around schools in compact hallways with hundreds of kids at a time, having classes with multiple groups of different kids, eating and interacting without masks in full cafeterias.  Basically, all the ingredients to super spread the disease....



No.
Teach from a distance over Zoom.



mZuzek said:
NightlyPoe said:
JRPGfan said:

Yep... however you cant just ignore reality.

I'm not ignoring reality.  I'm dealing with the situation as it exists.  If kids were becoming sick or spreading the disease at a high rate, that would be one thing.  But the spread among young children is very low.  That's been the single lucky break we've gotten from this disease.

As it stands, the dangers of not educating a whole generation of children outweigh the benefits of keeping them home.  Those consequences are permanent as well and will become greater and greater as the time out of school extends outward.

I don't get this point. It's not like kids aren't ever going to school. If the entire education system is delayed by one year, children won't suddenly become dumb forever because they stayed home for a year and are going to finish school aged 18 instead of 17. Nothing changes, like, at all.

On that note, I have had students that have come from third world countries and have had no formal education their entire lives.  They are usually up to grade level within a couple of years.  It honestly isn’t super difficult for students to catch up as long as they are willing to work for it.  I will admit it does require some buy in from the student though.