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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Nintendo and its prices

This has stopped me from buying lots of Nintendo games over the years. It really annoys the shit out of me, to be honest. I almost never buy Nintendo games if they fail to pull me in around launch. I just can't get my head around the prices once the games are a year or two old.

On the other hand, since I resell many games after I've finished with them, I get some benefit from the relatively stable prices. I can buy Zelda, sit on it for a year to play the DLC, and sell it for 75% of what I paid. If I bought a PS game at launch and held it for a year, I'd be lucky to get 40% back. This benefit is not enough to get me to spring for a $60, year old game though.



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GoOnKid said:

They simply follow a different pricing strategy than the competition. Steady prices produce an image of higher quality compared to other games that land in the discount bin after a few weeks. Other publishers devaluate their own games by setting low prices. Why should I buy a game full price if I know for sure that it will be much cheaper in a couple of weeks? Other publishers double harm themselves by cutting into their own profits and by deflecting the quality of their own products. Customers nowadays fully expect discounts and to some degree have adapted their purchase behaviours accordingly. It's a negative trend set by the publishers themselves. I understand that the prices can be set by the retail stores, yes, but I also believe that they don't set the prices however they feel like but rather according to an MSRPs which they receive from the publishers.

With Nintendo games, it doesn't matter when a customer buys them because the prices will stay steady. This is the reason why we see many Nintendo games having strong legs. These effects go hand in hand. You buy a Nintendo game when you are ready for it, and I believe that customers will enjoy games more if they truly want to purchase them instead of buying them when they happen to be on sale.

I believe that this publisher habit of decreasing prices shortly after release led us to this high emphasis of first week sales. Back in my days nobody gave a shit about how many units could have been sold within the first week, nowadays it's a key figure. It was all about lifetime sales.

You may agree or disagree with Nintendo's strategy. It's successful, however.

Wait, what?  You enjoy a game more if you pay more money for it? 

The price of a game never enters my mind while I'm playing.  Some of my favorite games of all time have come from the bargain bin or Steam sales.  Final Fantasy I literally came out the bargain bin at a drugstore.  I bought Suikoden 1 used for 5$.  Final Fantasy VI I picked up used for 15$.  

You're trying too hard to think of justifications for something that doesn't really need a justification. 

A business can follow whatever business model they want.  In Nintendo's case, they're looking to make as much money per customer as they can.  They have a very dedicated base and they know they can get away with it.  Other publishers typically face more competition and thus choose to increase brand support by increasing consumer access, usually in the hopes that it will result in more money down the line.  Borderlands was just about free before Borderlands 2 released and the jump in exposure worked to increase launch numbers.



If it sells it sells, why lower the price?



If it isn't turnbased it isn't worth playing   (mostly)

And shepherds we shall be,

For Thee, my Lord, for Thee. Power hath descended forth from Thy hand, That our feet may swiftly carry out Thy command. So we shall flow a river forth to Thee And teeming with souls shall it ever be. In Nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spiritūs Sancti. -----The Boondock Saints

Who in their mind would drop the price of their games if they still sold like hotcakes?



GoOnKid said:
KLXVER said:
Their prices so far on Switch has been insane. 60 bucks for years old ports. 50 bucks for games like 1 2 Switch and that IOS looking sushi game. 70 bucks for Labo. Combine that with their refusal to discount them and its just terrible. Soon we have to pay to play them online as well. Their greed is in high gear this gen.

Wait, so you think other publishers lower their prices because they are generous?

No, I think they lower the prices because they want the people who wont spend 60 dollars on their games.



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pokoko said:
GoOnKid said:

They simply follow a different pricing strategy than the competition. Steady prices produce an image of higher quality compared to other games that land in the discount bin after a few weeks. Other publishers devaluate their own games by setting low prices. Why should I buy a game full price if I know for sure that it will be much cheaper in a couple of weeks? Other publishers double harm themselves by cutting into their own profits and by deflecting the quality of their own products. Customers nowadays fully expect discounts and to some degree have adapted their purchase behaviours accordingly. It's a negative trend set by the publishers themselves. I understand that the prices can be set by the retail stores, yes, but I also believe that they don't set the prices however they feel like but rather according to an MSRPs which they receive from the publishers.

With Nintendo games, it doesn't matter when a customer buys them because the prices will stay steady. This is the reason why we see many Nintendo games having strong legs. These effects go hand in hand. You buy a Nintendo game when you are ready for it, and I believe that customers will enjoy games more if they truly want to purchase them instead of buying them when they happen to be on sale.

I believe that this publisher habit of decreasing prices shortly after release led us to this high emphasis of first week sales. Back in my days nobody gave a shit about how many units could have been sold within the first week, nowadays it's a key figure. It was all about lifetime sales.

You may agree or disagree with Nintendo's strategy. It's successful, however.

Wait, what?  You enjoy a game more if you pay more money for it? 

The price of a game never enters my mind while I'm playing.  Some of my favorite games of all time have come from the bargain bin or Steam sales.  Final Fantasy I literally came out the bargain bin at a drugstore.  I bought Suikoden 1 used for 5$.  Final Fantasy VI I picked up used for 15$.  

You're trying too hard to think of justifications for something that doesn't really need a justification. 

A business can follow whatever business model they want.  In Nintendo's case, they're looking to make as much money per customer as they can.  They have a very dedicated base and they know they can get away with it.  Other publishers typically face more competition and thus choose to increase brand support by increasing consumer access, usually in the hopes that it will result in more money down the line.  Borderlands was just about free before Borderlands 2 released and the jump in exposure worked to increase launch numbers.

I wasn't speaking of myself, but of the general customer. There are psychological effects that influence how we value things with different prices.

https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/insights/behavioral-impact-higher-price

The article explains the principle, which can easily be transferred to other products. The article itself already transfers it to wine, for example. It also tells how low prices can make a product seem to have low quality.

Also, I don't want to justify anything, I was only explaining that they follow a different strategy than the rest.

What do you mean by 'other publishers typically face more competition'? Don't they all swim in the same pool?



Gameplay > Graphics

Substance > Style

Art Direction > Realism

Because titles like Zelda keep selling well long after release, and a title like HZD does not.



The collector's market on Nintendo games is insane. Plenty of SNES, N64, and GC games go for $50 used to this day. Nintendo knows this, and refuses to lower the price on their games, because the used games market refused to as well. And guess what? That in turn makes used Nintendo games even more valuable and just reinforces the policy Nintendo already has!



OTBWY said:
Because titles like Zelda keep selling well long after release, and a title like HZD does not.

I don't think this really covers the point though. Horizon has sold more than all but 2 Switch games and is still selling more than most. Meanwhile 1,2 Switch (not exactly selling like hot cakes) is still more expensive. 



That was always thing with Nintendo, and people know and expecting that,
they games always held full price very long time, you have here and there maybe some discount on eShop, but thats it until Nintendo start relasing them like part of Nintendo Selects line where they have price point around $20.
And no, Nintendo dont need lower price point of games, sales of Switch and espacily sales of Switch games proves that.

Last edited by Miyamotoo - on 09 June 2018