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Forums - Politics Discussion - Question to non-Americans

 

My Countries Education System Teaches our history accurately.

Strongly Agree 14 24.56%
 
Somewhat Agree 18 31.58%
 
Neutral 7 12.28%
 
Somewhat Disagree 11 19.30%
 
Strongly Disagree 7 12.28%
 
Total:57

UK here. I don't think we ever covered colonialism and the empire in detail and the negative aspects weren't mentioned e.g the Irish potato famine. We learnt more about the medieval times



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Belgian here. Of course history classes in secondary school have a lot of simplifications and perhaps some minor mistakes. But I'm not aware of any really notable mistakes or propaganda. Belgium as a country is not that relevant in our history, since we were not independent until 1830, and these last 190 years are only covered at the end of secondary school (5th year is French Revolution up to World War 1, 6th year is everything after WW1).



Cobretti2 said:
LittleSnake said:

As an Australian, no. Our education system sucks, they didn't even teach geography! 

I learnt geography was a high school unit lol

Wtf, what state you from? They took all the good shit away from us but hey, I learnt about coaching! 😒 



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Brazil here.

Sure we weren't able to go deep since it was only regular school history with limited time, but I would say it was quite accurate on the positives and negatives. I would just say that for the case of where I studied it was a little left wing biased but not to the point of twisting the facts.

From memory I would say we had about 2h of world history and 1h of brazilian story per week. Because well Brazil as country is only 500year old versus about 10000 years we look on world history. So most of what was mentioned by people here on their country history was touched in our classes. I would say general brazilian that done a good school would know more about world history and geography than brazilian history and geography.

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LittleSnake said:
Pemalite said:

They certainly taught me geography in school in Australia.


Weird. Geography wasn't an option, and hasn't been for years. Didn't even learn it in primary school.
You lucky bastard 

Probably need to live in a certain geographical region to get offered that. ;)

curl-6 said:

Australia here.

In school I was taught nearly nothing about the country's violent colonial past including both the genocide of most of the indigenous population and the "stolen generation" just a few decades ago when huge numbers of native children were removed from their parents and placed in white foster homes to try to erase their culture.

They basically make it sound as though the British takeover of the country was peaceful.

We had Aboriginal studies at my schools, even learned the local Aboriginal language...
Social Studies certainly delved into Australia's Colonial past as well.

Going to assume you and Littlesnake are in different states (I'm in South Australia) as education tends to be state controlled hence the discrepancy.


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LittleSnake said:
Cobretti2 said:

I learnt geography was a high school unit lol

Wtf, what state you from? They took all the good shit away from us but hey, I learnt about coaching! 😒 

I was in Tassie, back in the 90s. I did go to a Private school though so not sure if that had anything to do with it. Compared to mainland it was cheap lol

Grade 7 and 8 we did basic introductions to Geography, History, etc and in Grade 9 onwards we kind of got a choice of what we wanted to do in terms of learning more about those topics. Geography or Forgot what it was as that wasn't interesting in grade 9 lol.

In Grade 7 we also did Japanese and French (half year each), then Grade 8 got to pick which one we wanted to continue.

Grade 9 in fact most subjects becoming an option subjects.

Some of these included woodwork, metalwork, music, cooking, art, drama, accounting and a higher level of maths.

The core STEM classes were still a requirement though for all years.

Last edited by Cobretti2 - 2 days ago

 

 

Flilix said:

Belgian here. Of course history classes in secondary school have a lot of simplifications and perhaps some minor mistakes. But I'm not aware of any really notable mistakes or propaganda. Belgium as a country is not that relevant in our history, since we were not independent until 1830, and these last 190 years are only covered at the end of secondary school (5th year is French Revolution up to World War 1, 6th year is everything after WW1).

So you never learned about the atrocities committed by Leopold II



sc94597 said:
Flilix said:

Belgian here. Of course history classes in secondary school have a lot of simplifications and perhaps some minor mistakes. But I'm not aware of any really notable mistakes or propaganda. Belgium as a country is not that relevant in our history, since we were not independent until 1830, and these last 190 years are only covered at the end of secondary school (5th year is French Revolution up to World War 1, 6th year is everything after WW1).

So you never learned about the atrocities committed by Leopold II

Well, I got a Belgian history course at university where there was a chapter on the colony. I don't remember whether or not I learned it in secondary school as well. It could be that we didn't, but we skipped over more important stuff as well. It could be argued that Leopold II's Congo is a notable part of Belgian history, but it could also be argued that it actually wasn't all that relevant (because these things happened on a different continent, also because they had little influence on anything else that we'd learn about, and also because the colony was privately owned by the king and had no ties to Belgium).

We did extensively analyse the song We Didn't Start The Fire by Billy Joel in the 6th year, in which the murder of Patrice Lumumba was mentioned.



UK here. Can't remember a single history lesson.

I remember a school trip to Verulamium though where I vandalised the signing in book, stole a walkie talker and started pranking the museum workers. Good times.



Pemalite said:
curl-6 said:

Australia here.

In school I was taught nearly nothing about the country's violent colonial past including both the genocide of most of the indigenous population and the "stolen generation" just a few decades ago when huge numbers of native children were removed from their parents and placed in white foster homes to try to erase their culture.

They basically make it sound as though the British takeover of the country was peaceful.

We had Aboriginal studies at my schools, even learned the local Aboriginal language...
Social Studies certainly delved into Australia's Colonial past as well.

Going to assume you and Littlesnake are in different states (I'm in South Australia) as education tends to be state controlled hence the discrepancy.

Yeah I'm in Victoria, and originally from a redneck country town. One of my teachers legit said the Stolen Generation only "allegedly" happened.



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