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Forums - Microsoft Discussion - Microsoft 2019 Super Bowl Ad: We All Win

 

EricHiggin said:
Kerotan said:

It's more a PR exercise then an advertising campaign. They are looking to improve the image of their brand rather then make straight sales of this product. Obviously it will help it sell but it's a niche market.

As far as PR campaigns go this is a very good one.

Edit:

This was taken the wrong way. Saying it's a niche market from an advertising point of view is a compliment to Microsoft because the financial reward from this is likely not big. Yet they are still putting in a great effort to help disabled gamers. That's great PR for the brand and image. 

MS could've stuck with the articles that were already written about this product, but they went all out and spent a boatload on a Super Bowl ad to show people they aren't just about making money and actually care. Since this product probably isn't financially driven, on top of the money spent to make this as widely known as possible, using the most expensive type of ad, does make it clear MS is trying to say we really do care, and here's proof.

Simply saying "PR" was probably taken the wrong way because it's mostly used in a negative manner, but I get what your saying. MS isn't directly trying to sell XB's with this commercial, and while they could potentially sell some indirectly, that's not the main objective. If they were seriously trying to sell XB's, they would have at least shown some games. That's what surprised me the most. They stuck to their guns and kept the focus on the charity aspect and not the gaming ecosystem itself.

What matters most is how MS follows through with this program. If they discontinue the product in the near future, that would make this all look pretty shady. There's really no reason to assume that's the case though, so there's really no reason to assume this is being done out of greed. I said not to long ago that MS needed to work on their PR, and this ad is a step in the right direction.

Great Post. You elaborated very nicely on what I said. 



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I came to mock the "everybody win" because they are dead last. By the idea of the controller and the ad is great and the initiative from MS is fantastic, kudos.

 

 BANNED: Trolling ~ CGI

Last edited by CGI-Quality - on 01 February 2019

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Mr Puggsly: "Hehe, I said good profit. You said big profit. Frankly, not losing money is what I meant by good. Don't get hung up on semantics"

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Pemalite said:

It says allot allot about a Company/Business/Organization/Government with how they treat those who are most vulnerable.

I doubt Microsoft is making much profit from this scheme with the volumes they will end up shifting, So props to Microsoft... And I hope other companies take note and make similar innovations.

They aren't likely to profit, but this comes off to me as though they want to use the disabled as a means to improve their brand image. I always, always have to ask these people,.these companies "where the hell were you guys decades ago, or 5-10 years ago when others were promoting/helping the disabled?". I see moves like this as though it's a "oh, I'm down on my luck, but this PR campaign will suit me just fine". 

I've always given to charity, be it money in charity boxes or giving away my clothing/books. I've never thought to myself "I need to do this to appear as something else", which is what these companies come off as to me when they only now just do this, and never once considered doing it years and years ago when it still mattered. 

It's been no surprise that MS has had it absolutely rough this gen, both via sales, popularity and PR, but to me, this just shows that they want to take on any group, like EA likes to pretend it supports LGBTQ (And yet they screw that up somehow).

A nice ad none the less, but I don't like the "when it suits me" mentality of how and when these ads spawn. These companies should have been all for the disabled and unfortunate since day 1, not when it suits PR and image. I absolutely hate companies taking advantage of the disabled, even if it's just PR image. 



This is very nice!

My disabled uncle used to play video games, too. He owned a Sega Mega Drive with lots of excellent games and since we all lived in the same house it was easy to just come together and play on "the Sega", as he used too call it. He got Parkinson when he turned three years old so his hands were always shaking heavily, mixed with a mental issue that made him stay on the level of a 9 year old kid even after becoming fully adult. It was so funny how he played Super Hang-On and leaned left and right with his entire body in every turn because he insisted that this was the proper way to play this. And how upset he was when he watched me and my brothers lose a life in Sonic, like he was really feeling sorry for us. Or how he cheerfully celebrated when we managed to finish a stage. I miss him.

I want to congratulate Microsoft for allowing the disabled to have some fun, too. Very good job.



Gameplay > Graphics

Substance > Style

Art Direction > Realism

Not going to lie, I teared up a bit watching that. Good on MS for releasing the adaptive controller for disabled gamers.

Last edited by shikamaru317 - on 01 February 2019

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Chazore said:

They aren't likely to profit, but this comes off to me as though they want to use the disabled as a means to improve their brand image. I always, always have to ask these people,.these companies "where the hell were you guys decades ago, or 5-10 years ago when others were promoting/helping the disabled?". I see moves like this as though it's a "oh, I'm down on my luck, but this PR campaign will suit me just fine".

You pretty much answered yourself. :P Likely not enough profit in the old environment to make it feasible.

At the end of the day though, it's better to be late than never.
Kinect was okay for some people with disabilities.

Chazore said:

I've always given to charity, be it money in charity boxes or giving away my clothing/books. I've never thought to myself "I need to do this to appear as something else", which is what these companies come off as to me when they only now just do this, and never once considered doing it years and years ago when it still mattered.

I probably should give to charity more often. - But they are usually religiously motivated, which kills my motivation to support them.

I think at the end of the day though, Microsoft should be praised for kickstarting things... Because the other gaming peripheral manufacturers haven't exactly been supporting those with disabilities.

Chazore said:

It's been no surprise that MS has had it absolutely rough this gen, both via sales, popularity and PR, but to me, this just shows that they want to take on any group, like EA likes to pretend it supports LGBTQ (And yet they screw that up somehow).

If it helps their image, then kudos to them... The real winners in all of this isn't Microsoft... Isn't even us. It's those with disabilities.

Chazore said:

A nice ad none the less, but I don't like the "when it suits me" mentality of how and when these ads spawn. These companies should have been all for the disabled and unfortunate since day 1, not when it suits PR and image. I absolutely hate companies taking advantage of the disabled, even if it's just PR image.

I come from a disability/aged carer background, so this isn't new ground for me... Companies do it all the time.
But you take it for what it is and take any benefits you can get.

I had a client once that was addicted to my SNES, he could only use his left hand... Consequently, there was a game on the SNES that was perfectly suited to him, Lufia 2. - You could play the entire game with just your left hand. Was fantastic.

Hopefully there is more to come in Microsoft/Sony/Nintendo catering for those with disabilities, because at the end of the day, it's a good thing, PR move or not.



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

 

Chazore said:

 

Pemalite said:

It says allot allot about a Company/Business/Organization/Government with how they treat those who are most vulnerable.

I doubt Microsoft is making much profit from this scheme with the volumes they will end up shifting, So props to Microsoft... And I hope other companies take note and make similar innovations.

They aren't likely to profit, but this comes off to me as though they want to use the disabled as a means to improve their brand image. I always, always have to ask these people,.these companies "where the hell were you guys decades ago, or 5-10 years ago when others were promoting/helping the disabled?". I see moves like this as though it's a "oh, I'm down on my luck, but this PR campaign will suit me just fine". 

I've always given to charity, be it money in charity boxes or giving away my clothing/books. I've never thought to myself "I need to do this to appear as something else", which is what these companies come off as to me when they only now just do this, and never once considered doing it years and years ago when it still mattered. 

It's been no surprise that MS has had it absolutely rough this gen, both via sales, popularity and PR, but to me, this just shows that they want to take on any group, like EA likes to pretend it supports LGBTQ (And yet they screw that up somehow).

A nice ad none the less, but I don't like the "when it suits me" mentality of how and when these ads spawn. These companies should have been all for the disabled and unfortunate since day 1, not when it suits PR and image. I absolutely hate companies taking advantage of the disabled, even if it's just PR image. 

In response to part of your post pretty much what I was saying. However unlike you I'll not hold it against them the fact they didn't give this push years ago. To me that's just looking for a reason to be negative on them. MS are one of the industry leaders in helping disabled gamers in a market that likely isn't very profitable if at all so why the hell do they not get full credit with no strings attached? 

 

We could take that thought process about any company in the world, pick something they didn't use 10 years ago and they hold it against them I strongly disagree. 



 

Pemalite said: 

I probably should give to charity more often. - But they are usually religiously motivated, which kills my motivation to support them.

I think at the end of the day though, Microsoft should be praised for kickstarting things... Because the other gaming peripheral manufacturers haven't exactly been supporting those with disabilities.


If it helps their image, then kudos to them... The real winners in all of this isn't Microsoft... Isn't even us. It's those with disabilities.


I come from a disability/aged carer background, so this isn't new ground for me... Companies do it all the time.
But you take it for what it is and take any benefits you can get.

I had a client once that was addicted to my SNES, he could only use his left hand... Consequently, there was a game on the SNES that was perfectly suited to him, Lufia 2. - You could play the entire game with just your left hand. Was fantastic.

Hopefully there is more to come in Microsoft/Sony/Nintendo catering for those with disabilities, because at the end of the day, it's a good thing, PR move or not.

Why does it kill your motivation?. Going by your later logic, surely it wouldn't matter and be a good thing right?. I'm not a fan of religion myself, but a few of my friends are religious and I support them for their choices either way (just as long as they don't try to convert me).

Kickstarting, I dunno, I'm sure throughout history has at least designed a controller for the slightly disabled.

Edit: after some checking, it seems there have been gamepads and mods made for the disabled over the years: https://www.ranker.com/list/video-game-controllers-for-people-with-disabilities/nathan-gibson So this isn't exactly a first ever thing to be done before. Likely the first ever Superbowl ad for something like this, but we shouldn't put the ad above the act itself, an act already done before by others out there.

Of course it'll help their image, I wasn't expecting it to backfire or damage their image.

 

I to come from a similar background (two residential homes, owned in the past by my folks). I'm aware it's nothing new, but that doesn't mean it's alright for any company to make prime use of the disabled, like an upcoming president campaigner does when using someone's baby for PR.

End of the day it's great that the disabled get more going for them. I just wish these companies displayed this level of caring a decade or two ago, because to me it doesn't feel genuine, it feels like using them, and no one likes the disabled being taken advantage of PR or not. 



 

Kerotan said:

 

In response to part of your post pretty much what I was saying. However unlike you I'll not hold it against them the fact they didn't give this push years ago. To me that's just looking for a reason to be negative on them. MS are one of the industry leaders in helping disabled gamers in a market that likely isn't very profitable if at all so why the hell do they not get full credit with no strings attached? 

 

We could take that thought process about any company in the world, pick something they didn't use 10 years ago and they hold it against them I strongly disagree. 

Knowing you kero, you'd take any chance you can take  

Really there wasn't much to add to the post, other than wanting to take a shot. 

I strongly disagree with your logic either way at the end of the day. People can and have been proven to abusing PR gains, like it or not. 


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Last edited by CGI-Quality - on 02 February 2019

Chazore said:
Pemalite said:

It says allot allot about a Company/Business/Organization/Government with how they treat those who are most vulnerable.

I doubt Microsoft is making much profit from this scheme with the volumes they will end up shifting, So props to Microsoft... And I hope other companies take note and make similar innovations.

They aren't likely to profit, but this comes off to me as though they want to use the disabled as a means to improve their brand image. I always, always have to ask these people,.these companies "where the hell were you guys decades ago, or 5-10 years ago when others were promoting/helping the disabled?". I see moves like this as though it's a "oh, I'm down on my luck, but this PR campaign will suit me just fine". 

I've always given to charity, be it money in charity boxes or giving away my clothing/books. I've never thought to myself "I need to do this to appear as something else", which is what these companies come off as to me when they only now just do this, and never once considered doing it years and years ago when it still mattered. 

It's been no surprise that MS has had it absolutely rough this gen, both via sales, popularity and PR, but to me, this just shows that they want to take on any group, like EA likes to pretend it supports LGBTQ (And yet they screw that up somehow).

A nice ad none the less, but I don't like the "when it suits me" mentality of how and when these ads spawn. These companies should have been all for the disabled and unfortunate since day 1, not when it suits PR and image. I absolutely hate companies taking advantage of the disabled, even if it's just PR image. 

I also cringe when it looks like someone or a group are being used, but in this case, I have to look at it from a genuine perspective at present. When your a company like XB within MS, spoiled and safe, and you've had nothing but success and growth, sometimes it takes a hard kick in the nuts from the market/competition to start to understand what it's like to be on the short end of the stick. That negative event will hopefully open your eyes to the bigger picture. PS themselves got a taste of this during the PS3 era, and it led to them making console gaming great again overall, but they didn't seem to take the same kind of hit that XB1 has, which is why we see the many positive changes going on within the XB ecosystem.

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/playstation-4-accessibility-update_n_6842544?ec_carp=3347347424851652991

When articles like the one above start to show up, it's the perfect time for a brand who's in need of a wake up call, like XB was, to take notice and up their game. If they do, and they follow through, then you have to give them props for 'seeing the light' and taking action. The other thing to take into account, is that when a brand is on fire, stories about programs like this tend to get overshadowed quite easily, even if they are going on behind the scenes and are trying to get coverage. People tend to be less inclined to focus on charity when things are going way to good. Luckily the world typically does a good job of knocking people or groups down a peg to keep them honest and giving, even the 'evil' mega corporations.