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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - How to handle Eshop games if you're low on cash or uncertain you don't get a bad game?

I'd honestly stick to Xbox, PlayStation, and Steam if you're worried about getting burned. They tend to have better deals and game services anyway. Steam is full of shovelware as well though (like Switch), so you have to be careful there.

I'd be particularly wary about games that have almost no reviews, or mostly negative ones.



Lifetime Sales Predictions 

Switch: 144 million (was 73, then 96, then 113 million, then 125 million)

PS5: 105 million Xbox Series S/X: 60 million

PS4: 120 mil (was 100 then 130 million, then 122 million) Xbox One: 51 mil (was 50 then 55 mil)

3DS: 75.5 mil (was 73, then 77 million)

"Let go your earthly tether, enter the void, empty and become wind." - Guru Laghima

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What I'm about to say can apply to any digital shop or even retailers, not only or necessarily the eShop, so it might be useful for anyone. It's nothing special, anyway, but what I do when I don't know anything about the quality of a certain game is looking for...

1) ...trailers of the game. Does it look like something I would want to play right now or in the future? No? Out. Yes? Next step.

2) ...the length of the game in HowLongToBeat. How much theoretical enjoyment can I get from it? Also, do I want something that allows me to spend a lot of hours or something more condensed? Whatever the case, quantity doesn't equal quality, so next.

3) ...the game in Metacritic. What do other people think of the game? Scores are irrelevant, but the feedback of other users (if there is any) can be useful. Reviews from specialized media can also be useful, even more if they differ a lot (a good option is choosing one of the best, one of the worst and one in the middle).

If at this point I'm still interested, but not decided yet, then I took one last step: watching gameplays. Not whole gameplays, of course, just bits of them, focusing on anything that would make me hesitant to buy the game and seeing for myself how it's handled.

Then I just have to think about all of the above and make my choice. It may sound like doing all this for every game you're doubtful about might be a bit too much, but it generally pays off: many times I buy games that I enjoy a lot (even if they're not the best in their genres) and I end up putting a good amount of hours in them for just a few euros (even 1 or 2 if they're on sale, and I generally wait until they are).

Last edited by Verter - on 20 December 2020

I have periods of social disconnection, it's a part of me that I need and keenly embrace. I'll still log in and read news and threads during those times, but I won't be (very) active on the site, so I apologize for any inconvenience that this may cause (late answers, bumps or the like).

Also...

Please, feel free to correct my English.

GoOnKid said:

Perhaps this thread might be helpful.

https://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/thread/237454/the-nintendo-eshop-game-rating-thread/1/

Really need to get on and update the thread. Should have some time later today to do so.



You have an Xbox and all of the games you mentioned are on Game Pass.



Jumpin said:
dx11332sega said:

Also Cyber shadow seems like a sleeper hit The pixel art does not bother me It's gameplay seems strong and I'm reminded of strider from Xbox one and PS4 Or the messenger on Nintendo switch

I doubt it will be a sleeper hit. Usually those that become sleeper hits offer something that hasn't been properly tested in the market: Just Dance, GE007, and Minecraft all have this in common. Another type of game is one that takes something existing and reimagines it into something that makes more sense - Stardew Valley is an outstanding example of that. The neo-8-bit action title has been thriving for a while and is already stiff in competition it's doubtful a Ninja Gaiden clone will become a sleeper hit unless I'm completely missing something (which is highly highly highly possible!).

If you want to pass on the fact that a similar NG inspired game like The Messenger was a sleeper hit on the Switch then yeah. Also it is pushed by Yacht Club Games so it definitely to get the backing of one of the biggest Indie studio out there.



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Cyber Shadow meta'd high .



Cute and honest Sega Saturn fan, also noone should buy Sega grrrr, Sega for life.

Buy games in stores with a return policy.



Mar1217 said:
Jumpin said:

I doubt it will be a sleeper hit. Usually those that become sleeper hits offer something that hasn't been properly tested in the market: Just Dance, GE007, and Minecraft all have this in common. Another type of game is one that takes something existing and reimagines it into something that makes more sense - Stardew Valley is an outstanding example of that. The neo-8-bit action title has been thriving for a while and is already stiff in competition it's doubtful a Ninja Gaiden clone will become a sleeper hit unless I'm completely missing something (which is highly highly highly possible!).

If you want to pass on the fact that a similar NG inspired game like The Messenger was a sleeper hit on the Switch then yeah. Also it is pushed by Yacht Club Games so it definitely to get the backing of one of the biggest Indie studio out there.

I was under the impression The Messenger didn't sell very well after receiving a lot of hype; that's pretty much the opposite of a sleeper hit as far as indie titles go.

https://gonintendo.com/stories/318092-the-messenger-sales-are-just-under-50k-on-all-platforms-after-o



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

This is why I miss gaming magazines, We had Australia's best selling gaming magazine an all format mag called Hyper for around 20 years and it had great reviewers especially Elliot Fish who is still in the industry involved as a behind the scenes expert and TV gaming show producer, and because the body of work of editorial staff tended to be lengthy with some spanning decades you had a long history of reviews to gauge who's tastes were closest in alignment with your own. also I also think it helped that the staff loved playing and reviewing games across all formats, I remember the Editor who spent 2 weeks straight playing FF7 at home so that they would not only have the review out for launch but also the 2 part playthrough completed he sadly left later on down the track to work for creative assembly as a designer. they even roped in their design editor to do review's of Wipeout games when they found out he won Australia's Wipeout title and set records.sadly this familiarity never translated across to online.

Last edited by mjk45 - on 31 March 2021

Research shows Video games  help make you smarter, so why am I an idiot

Best is advice is probably don't just browse e-shop with generic intention/open-ness to buy games. Only buy them after you have developed strong reason to, from personal word of mouth or playing with friends, or in depth reviews or game play so you know what to expect. Impulse buying what is in front of your eyes is a real thing companies try to exploit, so don't give them the opportunity. Don't just be directionless consumer, organize your time into activities that you direct.