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Forums - Sales Discussion - Why Sonys Play Station is the standard for home consoles since 1994 ?

PS1 108 million units 

PS2 159 million units

PS3 88 million units

PS4 112 million units and counting

Despite the small slack of PS3 that finished second only less than 15m of Wii, Sonys Play Station seems to be an ever-lasting success-story in home consoles Industry since its 1994 launch. Why do you think Sony managed to dominate the home console market like no other in the recent times ? 



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They chose the right popular media finally after a lot of previous failures like betamax. So choosing CDs for PS1, DVDs for PS2 and then Blu Ray for PS3 helped a lot.

Also they had insane third party support and their first party exclusives are usually really good.



Generally being nice to developers (which tends to get your platforms the largest library of in-gen games) and generally smart pricing are the two qualities that stand out the most to me. Also, at this point their legacy of successes is a factor in its own right.

Those have been the most consistent factors advantaging them, I think. To me. These days the PlayStation brand also stands out for its continued focus on single-player games for adults, which I think there's more demand for out there than the competition realizes. This is the main appeal of the PlayStation brand for me personally these days.

Also they've usually had the right tech for the right time. Timing is important on that stuff! There were 32-bit, CD-based gaming consoles (like the 3DO for example) before the PlayStation, but they didn't take off for reasons of price and inconvenience to developers because the gaming market itself wasn't yet ready to move on from 16-bit. I could go on with examples of what I mean, but the core thing I'm talking about is a pattern of neither falling behind where the market is nor getting ahead of it. Intuiting where the average gamer is and what they can afford at a given juncture.



Games lots and lots of games.

Also generally not a pain to make games for. Nintendo were too focused on piracy and trying to use storage medium that they thought would prevent it and was against what the others were doing so always an uphill battle for ports.

Cart vs CD, mini DVD vs DVD, DVD vs BluRay



 

 

Strong 3rd party support and good 1st party library to complement it.



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Because it's the most exhaustive blend of games from Western developers and Japanese developers. Microsoft is typically lacking in Japanese support, and Nintendo lacks a lot of AAA third-party games (Japanese or otherwise).
First-party games do help. Gran Turismo, God of War, Uncharted, The Last of Us, etc. But they are merely a contributing factor and not as essential to Sony as they are for Nintendo.



Lifetime Sales Predictions 

Switch: 144 million (was 73, then 96, then 113 million, then 125 million)

PS5: 105 million Xbox Series S/X: 60 million

PS4: 120 mil (was 100 then 130 million, then 122 million) Xbox One: 51 mil (was 50 then 55 mil)

3DS: 75.5 mil (was 73, then 77 million)

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Because for gaming Sony is simply the best and they often make the right choices



3rd party support and brand familiarity. Xbox does have 3rd party support but due to Sony's past most Western gamers gravitate towards it. And Nintendo, eh they don't think of 3rd parties first but it's working out for them so I guess no harm done at this time.

By the way, those PS1 and PS2 numbers are well off by about 4 million or so for PS2 and 7 Million for PS1. Unless they sold another 4 Million/7Million in the past year I don't know about.



It wasn’t until 1997 that PSX became the leading console. And much of that had to do with Nintendo suddenly cutting support for the SNES, which probably should have been more of a wind-down. 1996 was a big year for SNES, and then there was nothing. It makes me wonder if Nintendo ordered third parties to stop supporting the SNES in early 1997 (even earlier, end of 1996 in the US).

The main reason is because Nintendo made such bad decisions with the N64 and GameCube. If Nintendo hadn’t gone with ultra-expensive cartridges, they would have held onto the major 3rd parties that Sony gained.

It’s kind of a no brainer for consumers when you see a console with 20 games vs one with 500 games, and the one with 500 games is selling them from between 1/2 to 1/5th the price.

The PSX and were was also the more interesting and compelling platform, as it didn’t have the perceived limits of the N64 and GameCube. Also, PS2 has a killer app with Grand Theft Auto 3 and the series that followed. Interestingly enough, from one of Nintendo’s former Dream Team second party Devs DMA (Space Station Silicon Valley, Uniracers, and Body Harvest) who Nintendo effectively kicked off the team during the N64 gen.

I think PS2’s sleek look also helped it against the ugly Xbox and GameCube designs.

PS3 failed for against Wii for kind of similar reasons. Wii was sleek, compelling, and had a high volume of games compared to its competitors. On top of that, the competitors were too expensive. Sony was saying things like “People will pay this expensive price because they will want to in order to play our games.” And while some did, most bought Wiis and DS Lites instead.

Anyway, I’d say that Sony’s dominance has ended with the release of the Switch, as Switch has been the top console of the market for a while now, with the PS4 only occasionally catching up. Again, PS4 got lucky that Nintendo screwed up so badly with the late Wii generation and throwing support instead behind another monumental fuck-up: the Wii U.

Last edited by Jumpin - on 07 June 2020

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Jumpin said:

It wasn’t until 1997 that PSX became the leading console. And much of that had to do with Nintendo suddenly cutting support for the SNES, which probably should have been more of a wind-down. 1996 was a big year for SNES, and then there was nothing. It makes me wonder if Nintendo ordered third parties to stop supporting the SNES in early 1997 (even earlier, end of 1996 in the US).

The main reason is because Nintendo made such bad decisions with the N64 and GameCube. If Nintendo hadn’t gone with ultra-expensive cartridges, they would have held onto the major 3rd parties that Sony gained.

It’s kind of a no brainer for consumers when you see a console with 20 games vs one with 500 games, and the one with 500 games is selling them from between 1/2 to 1/5th the price.

The PSX and were was also the more interesting and compelling platform, as it didn’t have the perceived limits of the N64 and GameCube. Also, PS2 has a killer app with Grand Theft Auto 3 and the series that followed. Interestingly enough, from one of Nintendo’s former Dream Team second party Devs DMA (Space Station Silicon Valley, Uniracers, and Body Harvest) who Nintendo effectively kicked off the team during the N64 gen.

I think PS2’s sleek look also helped it against the ugly Xbox and GameCube designs.

PS3 failed for against Wii for kind of similar reasons. Wii was sleek, compelling, and had a high volume of games compared to its competitors. On top of that, the competitors were too expensive. Sony was saying things like “People will pay this expensive price because they will want to in order to play our games.” And while some did, most bought Wiis and DS Lites instead.

Anyway, I’d say that Sony’s dominance has ended with the release of the Switch, as Switch has been the top console of the market for a while now, with the PS4 only occasionally catching up. Again, PS4 got lucky that Nintendo screwed up so badly with the late Wii generation and throwing support instead behind another monumental fuck-up: the Wii U.

Microsoft, besides the almost infinite piles of money because other departments, is aways a paper tiger, in videogame scenario. Nintendo is the real contender here. Lest see the next generation.