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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Nintendo preparing Chinese translations of various Switch games

Unlike traditional consoles... The Switch really sets itself apart from the massive pc crowd there. It might be half a chance. I thought that too about the xbox one and the ps4 so time will tell. Good luck Nintendo!



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let's hope for the best!



Switch!!!

Bofferbrauer2 said:
twintail said:

The video appears to be in traditional Chinese (the account is traditional chinese). China uses simplified and not traditional.

This video is for Hong Kong (which got the Switch same time as JPN) and Taiwan (getting it in Dec)

What's the difference between the two?

The Peoples republic of China developed the simplified characters in an effort to make writing and reading more accessible to the whole populace. It means, thzat for some (not all) characters of the writing the number of strokes is reduced. To demonstrate this, look at this image:

These are the characters for chinese language. The first two refer to it as Hanyu (language of the han). The top row writes it in traditional characters, the second row the same as simplified. The third row stands for Zhongwen (chinese language), an alternative way to translate chinese language. I think in this case traditional and simplified characters are identical.

Simplified is the official writing in mainland China and Singapore, traditional in Taiwan.



3DS-FC: 4511-1768-7903 (Mii-Name: Mnementh), Nintendo-Network-ID: Mnementh, Switch: SW-7706-3819-9381 (Mnementh)

my greatest games: 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

10 years greatest game event!

bets: [1], [2], [3], [4]

Mnementh said:
Bofferbrauer2 said:

What's the difference between the two?

The Peoples republic of China developed the simplified characters in an effort to make writing and reading more accessible to the whole populace. It means, thzat for some (not all) characters of the writing the number of strokes is reduced. To demonstrate this, look at this image:

These are the characters for chinese language. The first two refer to it as Hanyu (language of the han). The top row writes it in traditional characters, the second row the same as simplified. The third row stands for Zhongwen (chinese language), an alternative way to translate chinese language. I think in this case traditional and simplified characters are identical.

Simplified is the official writing in mainland China and Singapore, traditional in Taiwan.

You beat me to the answer... I would just add that traditional Chinese is also used in Hong Kong and Macau



JC317 said:
Mnementh said:

The Peoples republic of China developed the simplified characters in an effort to make writing and reading more accessible to the whole populace. It means, thzat for some (not all) characters of the writing the number of strokes is reduced. To demonstrate this, look at this image:

These are the characters for chinese language. The first two refer to it as Hanyu (language of the han). The top row writes it in traditional characters, the second row the same as simplified. The third row stands for Zhongwen (chinese language), an alternative way to translate chinese language. I think in this case traditional and simplified characters are identical.

Simplified is the official writing in mainland China and Singapore, traditional in Taiwan.

You beat me to the answer... I would just add that traditional Chinese is also used in Hong Kong and Macau

Wasn't sure about that, that's why I left it out. Thanks for the addition.



3DS-FC: 4511-1768-7903 (Mii-Name: Mnementh), Nintendo-Network-ID: Mnementh, Switch: SW-7706-3819-9381 (Mnementh)

my greatest games: 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

10 years greatest game event!

bets: [1], [2], [3], [4]

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Bofferbrauer2 said:
twintail said:

The video appears to be in traditional Chinese (the account is traditional chinese). China uses simplified and not traditional.

This video is for Hong Kong (which got the Switch same time as JPN) and Taiwan (getting it in Dec)

What's the difference between the two?

As it was pointed out, the writing style is not the same. Simplified is exactly that, a simplified version of the chinese characters. Hope that helps a little. 



China is usually a difficult market for consoles due to factors such as cencorshio, translations, low average income and different taste in games. But let's see how the Switch will do, can't hurt anyway. And China is a mobile heavy country.



Mnementh said:
Bofferbrauer2 said:

What's the difference between the two?

The Peoples republic of China developed the simplified characters in an effort to make writing and reading more accessible to the whole populace. It means, thzat for some (not all) characters of the writing the number of strokes is reduced. To demonstrate this, look at this image:

These are the characters for chinese language. The first two refer to it as Hanyu (language of the han). The top row writes it in traditional characters, the second row the same as simplified. The third row stands for Zhongwen (chinese language), an alternative way to translate chinese language. I think in this case traditional and simplified characters are identical.

Simplified is the official writing in mainland China and Singapore, traditional in Taiwan.

Yes, in the final one the simplified and traditional are the same. I'm currently learning Chinese and Japanese, and for Chinese I try to learn both, and since Hanzi and Kanji were simplified differently, sometimes it means there are 3 variants of the character for me to learn!



Mainland China, Singapore & Malaysia use simplified Chinese, HK, TW & Macau use traditional Chinese.

They sound exactly the same (assuming spoken in the same dialect/Mandarin) but are written differently, although people who read one typically can read in the other, not sure why merely an empirical conclusion.

Just watched like 5s of the video, it seems as though it's for the HK & TW market, with the Odyssey trailer ending frames saying that the game is to be released in HK 27 Oct and in TW 01 Dec.

 

While it'd be good for Nintendo to enter the Chinese market, I'm not sure the market itself is groomed for mass console video game consumption.