Forums - PC Discussion - Help me build my GeForce GTX 1080 new PC Rig

torok said:

I don't think SSDs are good for gaming machines. Unless, of course, he doesn't mind deleting games and keeping only the few ones he's playing at the moment. Loading times are pretty fast even on HDDs and you can get a lot of space without a lot of cost (4 TB here).

Even on my PS3 I had to resort to a 500 GB HDD. Current gen games are huge. Most games are more than 30 GB now, so it won't cut.

If he has a pretty fast internet, if he won't usually play games that he already complete or if he won't want to keep more than 10 games installed all the time (which is normal if he plays online at least), then it can be a good deal.

SSDs are still really useful to have your OS and programs on it.

I own a laptop, when I bought a mSATA SSD to put my OS and apps on it, my laptop went Super Sayan. I'm never going back to HDD only. 

But weirdly enough, for games it's not really different.



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maxleresistant said:
 

SSDs are still really useful to have your OS and programs on it.

I own a laptop, when I bought a mSATA SSD to put my OS and apps on it, my laptop went Super Sayan. I'm never going back to HDD only. 

But weirdly enough, for games it's not really different.

Sorry, I meant SSDs for game storage. For the OS + drivers + key software, it's a beast. I don't use on on my laptop because I really use a lot of space (developer tools, VM, etc). For my desktop, it's on my buy list. Games + files on the HDDs and SSD for the previously mentioned items. Even with dual-boot on my PC, anything above 200GB would be perfect for me, so I wouldn't need a huge, expensive SSD.

I will probably grab an HDD for the PS4 first, since things there are critical with 500GB. My PC really doesn't need more space and I can deal with slower boot times and program launches for now.



Raistline said:

Here are my suggestions for you build.
Memory: Upgrade to a 2800 kit (16 GB is perfeclty fine and future proof. Today you honestly don't need more than 8GB but you will eventually need 16GB before your build needs an upgrade. Ignore the 32GB suggestions unless you plan to run Photoshop while encoding video in the background and gaming at the same time.)

Motherboard: Asus Z170 Pro (not the gaming version). This has more features, better NVMe support and the mosfets are more stable when overclocking.

Storage: Samsung 950 Pro NVMe drive (256GB +). Pair this with a 3TB Western Digital Green Drive for mass storage.

PSU: Grab a 650W Crosair Modular or Semi-modular PSU. This will give you room to go SLI if needed. You don't need more than this even for SLI. If you ever get bold enough to go Tri-SLI then upgrade this to the 850W vers.

Chassis: Grab anything you like so long as it is Full Tower size with lots of room to work in and is long enough that you don't have to remove the drive bays to install the GPU.

CPU Cooler Air: CoolerMaster 212 Evo (best air cooler on the market and cheap too)

CPU Cooler AIO Water: Crosair Hydro H80i. (easiest AIO to install and very effecient)

Also make sure you get a few case fans, At least 2 intake for the front, 1 exhaust and either 1 top or 1 side.
Coolermaster Silent 140mm have been the most reliable and quiet one I have found.

Most people nowadays say you don't need an Optical drive but I like to have one for Backing up my Blu-Ray and DVD collections. It can also be good if you want to install old games that you may still have. If you want to go this route you can get one for ~$50. I like the LG WH14NS40.

Hey, thanks a lot for the suggestions. I'll take a look at those in detail.



General gamer, fanboy hater

Mummelmann said:
Pemalite said:
I would go with the Core i7 5820K over the 6700K, I would also probably lean towards 32Gb of DDR4 Ram... Then all you need to worry about is dropping in a new GPU every few years and the system should last almost a decade.

I second this, I have a 5820K and it works incredibly well, and if he's not going SLi, there's no need for the extra lanes on the 5830 either. Beastly processor, plus the fact that CPU's haven't really been bottlenecks in gaming at all since the multi-core processing units came about. I remember my first Core 2 Duo kicking ass when the GPU kneeled (an AMD 1950XTX at the time).

You can still go SLI/Crossfire with the 5820K. But I just wouldn't take it farther than 3 cards though, PCI-E 3.0 8x vs 16x isn't terribly massive in gaming, compute is another matter entirely though...

Raistline said:

Here are my suggestions for you build.
Memory: Upgrade to a 2800 kit (16 GB is perfeclty fine and future proof. Today you honestly don't need more than 8GB but you will eventually need 16GB before your build needs an upgrade. Ignore the 32GB suggestions unless you plan to run Photoshop while encoding video in the background and gaming at the same time.)

I just don't see the point in going with 16Gb of Ram. If you go Socket 2011, you will have Quad Channel DDR. You can get a quad channel 16Gb for $109 AUD or 32Gb for $189. That extra $80 will mean you will never need to worry about Ram. Ever, for that entire systems life, heck even in the next system, which is a good thing as you would likely not upgrade the 5820 and the 2011 motherboard for many many many many years. Do it once, do it right.

I have noticed that games are starting to trend towards using 16Gb of system Ram too.

Also the frequency memory runs at... Has little bearing on performance.



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

torok said:
maxleresistant said:

SSDs are still really useful to have your OS and programs on it.

I own a laptop, when I bought a mSATA SSD to put my OS and apps on it, my laptop went Super Sayan. I'm never going back to HDD only. 

But weirdly enough, for games it's not really different.

Sorry, I meant SSDs for game storage. For the OS + drivers + key software, it's a beast. I don't use on on my laptop because I really use a lot of space (developer tools, VM, etc). For my desktop, it's on my buy list. Games + files on the HDDs and SSD for the previously mentioned items. Even with dual-boot on my PC, anything above 200GB would be perfect for me, so I wouldn't need a huge, expensive SSD.

I will probably grab an HDD for the PS4 first, since things there are critical with 500GB. My PC really doesn't need more space and I can deal with slower boot times and program launches for now.

I use a 500GB SSD for my games, it has plenty of storage for me and I have behemoths like TW3 and GTA5 installed on it, I also have a fairly sizable download folder on it. If it gets crowded, I move something to my external drive or I simply uninstall a finished game or delete something. I really don't see the need for 1TB or more storage today, with streaming being so common. On my older rigs, I had 1-2TB's of movies and TV series, but those days are gone.

I would easily recommend SSD for games as well, the performance improvement is well worth it, especially if you have a performance rig and are looking to eliminate possible bottlenecks.

PS: Of course, I have a SSD system disc as well, but it's only 256GB.



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Go for it, your plan sounds good. No need to wait for GTX 1080 reviews since we already know it's a beast and is the best you can get for money in the coming 6 months. Start building your system now with the help of your friend who goes abroad! Actually I would ask him to buy another one or two parts, so you really feel the comp is coming together, it'll give you a more positive feel. Ask him to get a mother board and an SSD too. No problem to put those in a traveling bag.

Then you'll have 4 components, and it'll be easier to just buy the rest in your home country (or order on the internet?).

I would choose the Intel Core i7-6700K over a more expensive Intel CPU since that extra CPU power won't help you anything, especially at high resolutions. GPU is such a bottleneck. Mummelmann might disagree though.

SSD for installing games is a great idea! Mine is only 250GB but I still have room for 5-6 big games on it, I sometimes delete one to make room for another game I want to perform really well, while my main library is on a HDD. I was very sceptical before I bought one, but I think SSDs are really worth it (I should have gotten 500GB), the loading times are so fast.



Slimebeast said:

Go for it, your plan sounds good. No need to wait for GTX 1080 reviews since we already know it's a beast and is the best you can get for money in the coming 6 months. Start building your system now with the help of your friend who goes abroad! Actually I would ask him to buy another one or two parts, so you really feel the comp is coming together, it'll give you a more positive feel. Ask him to get a mother board and an SSD too. No problem to put those in a traveling bag.

Then you'll have 4 components, and it'll be easier to just buy the rest in your home country (or order on the internet?).

I would choose the Intel Core i7-6700K over a more expensive Intel CPU since that extra CPU power won't help you anything, especially at high resolutions. GPU is such a bottleneck. Mummelmann might disagree though.

SSD for installing games is a great idea! Mine is only 250GB but I still have room for 5-6 big games on it, I sometimes delete one to make room for another game I want to perform really well, while my main library is on a HDD. I was very sceptical before I bought one, but I think SSDs are really worth it (I should have gotten 500GB), the loading times are so fast.

Thankfully, SSD prices have fallen quite fast, and now you can buy a 1TB SSD for the money of a 256GB drive from 3-4 years ago.



Please excuse my bad English.

Currently gaming on a PC with an i5-4670k@stock (for now), 16Gb RAM 1600 MHz and a GTX 1070

Steam / Live / NNID : jonxiquet    Add me if you want, but I'm a single player gamer.

I wish I had 600 bucks to flop down on a graphics card



Slimebeast said:

I would choose the Intel Core i7-6700K over a more expensive Intel CPU since that extra CPU power won't help you anything, especially at high resolutions. GPU is such a bottleneck. Mummelmann might disagree though.

Actually. Not entirely accurate.

If your CPU isn't fast enough then your minimum and to a lesser degree, average framerates takes a chunky hit. And you notice your minimums more than your maximums.
Also if your CPU isn't fast enough in a Multi-GPU configuration then it can't feed the GPU's fast enough and your maximum framerates take a massive hit.
It's something I documented on an enthusiast overclocking forum when I was running a Phenom 2 and Dual Radeon's at 5760x1080, even in fairly light games, like most Unreal Engine 3 games, the Phenom 2 just wasn't enough to feed the GPU's. That was solved when I upgraded to the 3930K, the CPU was no longer pegged at 100% and the GPU's could run at 100% rather than say 50-70%.

Plus a CPU with more cores allows you to run more things in tandem, try running Xsplit, whilst encoding a video file and playing a demanding well-threaded video game like Civilization 5, the 6700K will crumple whilst the 5820K will cruise along without breaking a sweat.

It's like in the early Core 2 days, lots of people advised gamers not to bother going with the Core 2 Quad... It's a waste of money, those same Core 2 Quad machines ended up getting many more gaming years of use out of them.

My 3930K is sort of the same thing, whilst people are starting to notice their Sandy Bridge chips starting to age, my 3930K @ 5ghz is still able to outbench the  6700K. Heck even the 5930K and stock 5960X, it's still got many years of life left in it. (Just not as my primary rig.)

Plus the 6700K isn't that much cheaper than the 5820K. $558 vs $484 AUD. $74 for an extra 2 cores/4 threads, 7Mb Cache, higher overclocking headroom, it's worth the extra bucks.
Go big or go with the i5 6600K and save some cash instead.



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

NobleTeam360 said:
I wish I had 600 bucks to flop down on a graphics card

Pffft...... I wish $600 was all it would cost me!