Forums - PC Discussion - Help me build my GeForce GTX 1080 new PC Rig

torok said:
I wouldn't get the 1080 yet. Wait for benchmarks. I'm sure it's a nice GPU, but you should take a look at the previous series.

The 980 wasn't a pretty great deal. It was only marginally better than the 970. The OC 970 models also were basically on par with the stock 1080. And an OC'ed 970 was actually around 330-350 dollar, while you would need 500 for a 980. So, for CB, the 970 was way better. For power? The 980ti arrived a year latter and stomped the 980. If the history repeats itself, the 1070 will be a better deal. So wait for the benchmarks to see if the 1080 really is a much better GPU or if it isn't.

I would count on a minor advantage. The 970 was a huge success, I believe Nvidia will prioritize the 1070 over the 1080 since it can be another sales driver. Just the enthuasiasts aren't that much into the 1070, but they probably aren't that much into the 1080 since these guys probably already have a 980ti or are waiting for the 1080ti.

The 980 didn't do so well because the 970 was INSANE. This generation the power of the 1070 and 1080 appear to be more in line with previous generations. An extra 2.5 Tera flops plus HB SLI should be worth paying the extra cash. Of course we'll have to wait for benchmarks to be sure but just going by what information we have it should be a good buy.



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KLXVER said:
Put the small thing on top of the big thing and then fasten them to the third thing. Hope it helps.

Then plug in the long thing into the other thing and start the thing.



You can't play current games with maxed out settings at 4K60fps with only one GPU, no GPU is capable of doing that currently.This is probably the first generation where we'll be able to do that with only 2 GPUs though.



Isn't it a good guess that any of them is gonna be better than 980ti?



General gamer, fanboy hater

I would go with the Core i7 5820K over the 6700K, I would also probably lean towards 32Gb of DDR4 Ram... Then all you need to worry about is dropping in a new GPU every few years and the system should last almost a decade.



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

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My steam folders are on a 500Gb SSD, totally worth it.



1. Chassis yes, you should buy one

2. CPU Cooler probably useful

3. Motherboard Also yes

4. SSD/HD good idea

5. PSU What is that?

 

I would add that contrary to the belief, having your games on an SSD doesn't improve much the loading times. The games are so big now, it's too costly to put them on an SSD, I had to switch back to HDD. And frankly, it's still really fast to boot games.

Anyway, if you get a 256GB SSD, you'll still be able to put a few games on it. The ones you play the most



Pemalite said:
I would go with the Core i7 5820K over the 6700K, I would also probably lean towards 32Gb of DDR4 Ram... Then all you need to worry about is dropping in a new GPU every few years and the system should last almost a decade.

I second this, I have a 5820K and it works incredibly well, and if he's not going SLi, there's no need for the extra lanes on the 5830 either. Beastly processor, plus the fact that CPU's haven't really been bottlenecks in gaming at all since the multi-core processing units came about. I remember my first Core 2 Duo kicking ass when the GPU kneeled (an AMD 1950XTX at the time).



maxleresistant said:

I would add that contrary to the belief, having your games on an SSD doesn't improve much the loading times. The games are so big now, it's too costly to put them on an SSD, I had to switch back to HDD. And frankly, it's still really fast to boot games.

Anyway, if you get a 256GB SSD, you'll still be able to put a few games on it. The ones you play the most

I don't think SSDs are good for gaming machines. Unless, of course, he doesn't mind deleting games and keeping only the few ones he's playing at the moment. Loading times are pretty fast even on HDDs and you can get a lot of space without a lot of cost (4 TB here).

Even on my PS3 I had to resort to a 500 GB HDD. Current gen games are huge. Most games are more than 30 GB now, so it won't cut.

If he has a pretty fast internet, if he won't usually play games that he already complete or if he won't want to keep more than 10 games installed all the time (which is normal if he plays online at least), then it can be a good deal.

snowdog said:

The 980 didn't do so well because the 970 was INSANE. This generation the power of the 1070 and 1080 appear to be more in line with previous generations. An extra 2.5 Tera flops plus HB SLI should be worth paying the extra cash. Of course we'll have to wait for benchmarks to be sure but just going by what information we have it should be a good buy.

Nvidia didn't said much about the 1070 yet, so it's hard to measure the difference. We just know the floating point performance and that basically don't say much about gaming. After the first behnchmarks, we will be sure.



Here are my suggestions for you build.
Memory: Upgrade to a 2800 kit (16 GB is perfeclty fine and future proof. Today you honestly don't need more than 8GB but you will eventually need 16GB before your build needs an upgrade. Ignore the 32GB suggestions unless you plan to run Photoshop while encoding video in the background and gaming at the same time.)

Motherboard: Asus Z170 Pro (not the gaming version). This has more features, better NVMe support and the mosfets are more stable when overclocking.

Storage: Samsung 950 Pro NVMe drive (256GB +). Pair this with a 3TB Western Digital Green Drive for mass storage.

PSU: Grab a 650W Crosair Modular or Semi-modular PSU. This will give you room to go SLI if needed. You don't need more than this even for SLI. If you ever get bold enough to go Tri-SLI then upgrade this to the 850W vers.

Chassis: Grab anything you like so long as it is Full Tower size with lots of room to work in and is long enough that you don't have to remove the drive bays to install the GPU.

CPU Cooler Air: CoolerMaster 212 Evo (best air cooler on the market and cheap too)

CPU Cooler AIO Water: Crosair Hydro H80i. (easiest AIO to install and very effecient)

Also make sure you get a few case fans, At least 2 intake for the front, 1 exhaust and either 1 top or 1 side.
Coolermaster Silent 140mm have been the most reliable and quiet one I have found.

Most people nowadays say you don't need an Optical drive but I like to have one for Backing up my Blu-Ray and DVD collections. It can also be good if you want to install old games that you may still have. If you want to go this route you can get one for ~$50. I like the LG WH14NS40.