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Forums - Movies & TV - Should comedians have boundaries?

 

Should comedians have boundaries?

Yes 12 19.67%
 
No 49 80.33%
 
Total:61
KLXVER said:
CourageTCD said:

Yes. If your type of comedy consists of spreading hate speech, raise social suspicion against marginalized minorities and soften ideas that go against human rights, you should suffer legal consequences. There are comedians who seek to do all of that as a priority and have the laughters as an ocasional and mere consequence. I've seen a lot of people saying a bunch of crap and trying to get away with it by basicly raising a "it's a joke" sign. What a lot of people don't understand is that words aren't merely a bunch of sounds, they have the power to affect the world, specially if you have a whole audience listening to you.

So which comedians do you think should face legal consequences for their comedy?

The ones that, by doing what I've said, break the law. That's why I said "legal consequences"



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CourageTCD said:
KLXVER said:

So which comedians do you think should face legal consequences for their comedy?

The ones that, by doind what I've said, breaks the law. That's why I said "legal consequences"

Well if you dont have any examples, then I guess no one has ever done that...



KLXVER said:
CourageTCD said:

The ones that, by doind what I've said, breaks the law. That's why I said "legal consequences"

Well if you dont have any examples, then I guess no one has ever done that...

It is complicated to give you examples as we are probably not from the same country, so you wouldn't know the comedian nor know the law he is breaking from my country, the same way I don't know comedians/laws from the place you live. My point is if someone, who happens to call him/herself a comedian, is using their words to break laws with sprinkles of laughter behind it, he/she should face legal consequences. This comedian would have the right to defend him/herself on court and be found guilty or not guilty from whatever thing he/she was being accused of



CourageTCD said:
KLXVER said:

Well if you dont have any examples, then I guess no one has ever done that...

It is complicated to give you examples as we are probably not from the same country, so you wouldn't know the comedian nor know the law he is breaking from my country, the same way I don't know comedians/laws from the place you live. My point is if someone, who happens to call him/herself a comedian, is using their words to break laws with sprinkles of laughter behind it, he/she should face legal consequences. This comedian would have the right to defend him/herself on court and be found guilty or not guilty from whatever thing he/she was being accused of

Well Ive never seen a comedian use hate speech or break the law in any way. Ive seen them joke about it though. Im not sure what country you are from, but being arrested for jokes would be wrong wherever in the world you are imo.



If a comedian makes a joke that is offensive, there will be natural consequences. That is, less viewers, less audience members, etc.

Statistics show that the majority of content and posts on social media are actually done by a small group of people. In which case, it is not for a vocal minority on social media to decide. It is up to the actual majority of the population by which that entertainment is supposed to cater to. I definitely don't think there should be any legal consequences outside of what would already be considered breaking the law (i.e. call to violence, etc).



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CourageTCD said:

Yes. If your type of comedy consists of spreading hate speech, raise social suspicion against marginalized minorities and soften ideas that go against human rights, you should suffer legal consequences. There are comedians who seek to do all of that as a priority and have the laughters as an ocasional and mere consequence. I've seen a lot of people saying a bunch of crap and trying to get away with it by basicly raising a "it's a joke" sign. What a lot of people don't understand is that words aren't merely a bunch of sounds, they have the power to affect the world, specially if you have a whole audience listening to you.

Legal consequences?  That's crazy.  

Cancel culture is bad enough. You want to add fines and imprisonment to the list of consequences?



Doctor_MG said:

If a comedian makes a joke that is offensive, there will be natural consequences. That is, less viewers, less audience members, etc.

Statistics show that the majority of content and posts on social media are actually done by a small group of people. In which case, it is not for a vocal minority on social media to decide. It is up to the actual majority of the population by which that entertainment is supposed to cater to. I definitely don't think there should be any legal consequences outside of what would already be considered breaking the law (i.e. call to violence, etc).

Right. Let the market decide. This is the right approach.



CourageTCD said:

Yes. If your type of comedy consists of spreading hate speech, raise social suspicion against marginalized minorities and soften ideas that go against human rights, you should suffer legal consequences. There are comedians who seek to do all of that as a priority and have the laughters as an ocasional and mere consequence. I've seen a lot of people saying a bunch of crap and trying to get away with it by basicly raising a "it's a joke" sign. What a lot of people don't understand is that words aren't merely a bunch of sounds, they have the power to affect the world, specially if you have a whole audience listening to you.

But the thing of is that what is hate speech is highly subjective, especially when there is a bigger point to be made.  America, at least also has that pesky first amendment.  Sounds like you'd be considering doing away with that.  And it won't happen in my lifetime,sir. We will continue to have free speech and keep having that.  



VAMatt said:
CourageTCD said:

Yes. If your type of comedy consists of spreading hate speech, raise social suspicion against marginalized minorities and soften ideas that go against human rights, you should suffer legal consequences. There are comedians who seek to do all of that as a priority and have the laughters as an ocasional and mere consequence. I've seen a lot of people saying a bunch of crap and trying to get away with it by basicly raising a "it's a joke" sign. What a lot of people don't understand is that words aren't merely a bunch of sounds, they have the power to affect the world, specially if you have a whole audience listening to you.

Legal consequences?  That's crazy.  

Cancel culture is bad enough. You want to add fines and imprisonment to the list of consequences?

That's Justice to decide. If you are under a constitution that protects minorities or has laws covering situations of slander, defamation and insult, you can't expect to be immune to the Justice just because you are a comedian. He/she would go see to his/her situation in court. And it's not like as if the comedian would be immediatly found guilty from the accusation. He/she can be found not guilty after all.



shavenferret said:
CourageTCD said:

Yes. If your type of comedy consists of spreading hate speech, raise social suspicion against marginalized minorities and soften ideas that go against human rights, you should suffer legal consequences. There are comedians who seek to do all of that as a priority and have the laughters as an ocasional and mere consequence. I've seen a lot of people saying a bunch of crap and trying to get away with it by basicly raising a "it's a joke" sign. What a lot of people don't understand is that words aren't merely a bunch of sounds, they have the power to affect the world, specially if you have a whole audience listening to you.

But the thing of is that what is hate speech is highly subjective, especially when there is a bigger point to be made.  America, at least also has that pesky first amendment.  Sounds like you'd be considering doing away with that.  And it won't happen in my lifetime,sir. We will continue to have free speech and keep having that.  

It is subjective indeed, that's why there are judges in different courts (trial, appellate, high court) to decide if what have been said can be classified as a law violation (if you have laws that tackles prejudices, descrimination, slander, etc). And to finish things up, I'm not american, you can keep your first amendment with you.