Forums - Sports Discussion - Fitness thread - Post your objectives

@vivster, that was one of the best TED talks. Honestly though I was also surprised at how easy it was to change my diet the few times I did it. It's also surprising how similar your build seems to be to mummelman. I want to encourage you in your objectives because I have a similar thing with my abs and I finally see that it's possible with my new plan.

@Mummelmann. My approach to goals was always to use them as a springboard to increase my fitness, and I never let them discourage me, because then they work against me and I need them to work for me. I know that my mind works like almost everyone else, that it will tell me when I failed my goal, but I talk to it and tell it that the goals are there to help me, so I ignore that voice and listen to a new one that say "let's try again" or "let's change the goal!", because in the end I don't really want to reach my goals. In the end, I just want to get more in shape, and I use goals to help me do that. :) For example, in my card you'll see that I didn't achieve my running goal. That's okay because I also just added an abs workout goal, and I set it high for now (which I rarely do), but I'm ready to lower the frequency or intensity at any time. Because I really need the goals to propel me, and not hold me down. If you set a small goal, you never know it might help you build a good habit as you reach it. ;)

@Farsala, would you be able to obtain a scale to weight yourself, and do you have an approach to food? I did some pole-training in the past, it's very difficult. Do you use a high pole with a heavy base, or more of a pole between the floor and the ceiling?



Around the Network

I am 6'3" and about 290 pounds currently. My goal is to lose about 110 pounds of fat, then add on about 20-30 pounds of muscle. I have lost over 100 pounds before, so I know I can do it, I just stupidly let that weight come back over the last few years by not exercising enough nor eating right. The harder part is going to be putting on the muscle for me. I've tried in the past to put on muscle, but didn't have much luck. Daily workouts targeting different muscle groups with whey protein shakes after each workout, but while I got stronger, I never really got bigger. 

Last edited by shikamaru317 - on 05 July 2020

padib said:

@vivster, that was one of the best TED talks. Honestly though I was also surprised at how easy it was to change my diet the few times I did it. It's also surprising how similar your build seems to be to mummelman. I want to encourage you in your objectives because I have a similar thing with my abs and I finally see that it's possible with my new plan.

@Mummelmann. My approach to goals was always to use them as a springboard to increase my fitness, and I never let them discourage me, because then they work against me and I need them to work for me. I know that my mind works like almost everyone else, that it will tell me when I failed my goal, but I talk to it and tell it that the goals are there to help me, so I ignore that voice and listen to a new one that say "let's try again" or "let's change the goal!", because in the end I don't really want to reach my goals. In the end, I just want to get more in shape, and I use goals to help me do that. :) For example, in my card you'll see that I didn't achieve my running goal. That's okay because I also just added an abs workout goal, and I set it high for now (which I rarely do), but I'm ready to lower the frequency or intensity at any time. Because I really need the goals to propel me, and not hold me down. If you set a small goal, you never know it might help you build a good habit as you reach it. ;)

@Farsala, would you be able to obtain a scale to weight yourself, and do you have an approach to food? I did some pole-training in the past, it's very difficult. Do you use a high pole with a heavy base, or more of a pole between the floor and the ceiling?

I hear you, I always used to have goals and I reached most of them. But in later years, I find that I get annoyed when "life gets in the way", which it frequently does working the way I do. I rarely know if I'm going to get a good night's sleep nowadays. One thing I have learned though is to stop looking at what others are doing or succeeding in doing. When I was younger I tended to compare myself directly to others and their lifts and accomplishments. When I trained for strongman, I found myself agitated seeing other guys at the gym with what I deemed to be inferior genetics and lackluster focus both in training and diet achieve some pretty crazy results. Of course, I realized that most (if not all) of them were using chemical enhancement but that didn't help all that much and I sort of lost my will to push hard. This in conjunction with an unknown virus infection that sent me reeling for almost 9 months was the end of my all-out training many years ago. I was simply disillusioned when faced with the reality that I would never be able to compete with guys who were willing to inject or ingest pharmaceutical aid and I saw no purpose with my training. It didn't help that I got pulled into a massive PED roll-up on three separate fronts (fucked up luck), affecting both my workplace, gym and even my own apartment and living situation (PS: I didn't do anything illegal, just so that's clear).

Since then, I've been on and off for years, sometimes finding motivation only to lose it after a few months and revert to a less healthy lifestyle. Now, being older and wiser, I find that the health benefits and rewards of training alone are easily worth it once I get going, and it works wonders for my sleep cycles and overall mood. I do have a goal in mind, but no time-frame in which to place it since I can't know what's realistic for me now. It revolves around reaching my old strength peak (and beyond) at a much lower bodyweight. I know it will take time, but not how much. When I trained years ago my strength exploded when I found what worked for me (I added about 20-30 kilos to my Squat, Deadlift, and Bench in only 16 weeks at one point, despite being somewhat being at least intermediately trained at the beginning of the 16-week period). My genes seem to be good, and I have both the time and means, but my discipline always fails me. I guess my short-term goal should be maintaining discipline.



shikamaru317 said:

I am 6'3" and about 290 pounds currently. My goal is to lose about 120 pounds of fat, then add on about 20 pounds of muscle. I have lost over 100 pounds before, so I know I can do it, I just stupidly let that weight come back over the last few years by not exercising enough nor eating right. The harder part is going to be putting on the muscle for me. I've tried in the past to put on muscle, but didn't have much luck. Daily workouts targeting different muscle groups with whey protein shakes after each workout, but while I got stronger, I never really got bigger. 

Because you were not eating enough. Just working out and Protien shakes will not do it. Food regiment is the leading factor in building muscle (80/20 splitt with 80 being food being 80). Everybody has something called a maintenance calories, the amount you can eat per week and gain or lose any weight. If you want to build muscle you must eat over maintenance while having your body in a anabolic state(that is what working out is for) with a focus on eating hitting your macros.

I will post something later that will help everybody find their Maintenance/Macros and you can add or subtract depending on goal 



Xxain said:
shikamaru317 said:

I am 6'3" and about 290 pounds currently. My goal is to lose about 120 pounds of fat, then add on about 20 pounds of muscle. I have lost over 100 pounds before, so I know I can do it, I just stupidly let that weight come back over the last few years by not exercising enough nor eating right. The harder part is going to be putting on the muscle for me. I've tried in the past to put on muscle, but didn't have much luck. Daily workouts targeting different muscle groups with whey protein shakes after each workout, but while I got stronger, I never really got bigger. 

Because you were not eating enough. Just working out and Protien shakes will not do it. Food regiment is the leading factor in building muscle (80/20 splitt with 80 being food being 80). Everybody has something called a maintenance calories, the amount you can eat per week and gain or lose any weight. If you want to build muscle you must eat over maintenance while having your body in a anabolic state(that is what working out is for) with a focus on eating hitting your macros.

I will post something later that will help everybody find their Maintenance/Macros and you can add or subtract depending on goal 

That is probably why. I think I was eating like 2500 calories a day when attempting it, with only 2 protein shakes per day in addition to the normal protein in my diet. I seem to recall reading since then that you need like 3000+ calories a day, with 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, in order to actually build muscle. 



Around the Network
shikamaru317 said:
Xxain said:

Because you were not eating enough. Just working out and Protien shakes will not do it. Food regiment is the leading factor in building muscle (80/20 splitt with 80 being food being 80). Everybody has something called a maintenance calories, the amount you can eat per week and gain or lose any weight. If you want to build muscle you must eat over maintenance while having your body in a anabolic state(that is what working out is for) with a focus on eating hitting your macros.

I will post something later that will help everybody find their Maintenance/Macros and you can add or subtract depending on goal 

That is probably why. I think I was eating like 2500 calories a day when attempting it. I seem to recall reading that you need like 3000-4000 a day, with 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, in order to actually build muscle. 

No. No. This is also inaccurate. Everybody has a different metabolism, thus having different rates of burning food. Example - I am a "Hardgainer"; It is tough for me to put on and maintain weight. My maintenance is 2500 clalories a day jus to maintain!

.  I will post something later that will allow everybody to find their maintenance.



shikamaru317 said:
Xxain said:

Because you were not eating enough. Just working out and Protien shakes will not do it. Food regiment is the leading factor in building muscle (80/20 splitt with 80 being food being 80). Everybody has something called a maintenance calories, the amount you can eat per week and gain or lose any weight. If you want to build muscle you must eat over maintenance while having your body in a anabolic state(that is what working out is for) with a focus on eating hitting your macros.

I will post something later that will help everybody find their Maintenance/Macros and you can add or subtract depending on goal 

That is probably why. I think I was eating like 2500 calories a day when attempting it, with only 2 protein shakes per day in addition to the normal protein in my diet. I seem to recall reading since then that you need like 3000+ calories a day, with 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, in order to actually build muscle. 

It's usually about the balance of nutrients. While proteins are the building blocks for the expansion of muscle cells, carbs are the fuel (glucose). If your blood glucose levels are too low on average, and especially during or around workouts, you will not only see subpar performance but also a smaller degree of hypertrophy since low blood glucose typically means inhibited protein synthesis and thus less actual use of said building blocks. One of the most common dietary mistakes is not filling up the blood glucose levels after a workout, limiting the body's ability to and interest in building muscle. Strength gain is somewhat easier since it's more about neural adaptation than the actual size of the muscle itself (in other words; two muscles of roughly equal size can be neurally adapted to performing at completely different levels), but there is, of course, a connection between the size and strength of a muscle as well.

Proponents of keto diets will argue that one doesn't need carbs at all, or very little of it. The problem with that is that the majority of people who attempt to go into ketosis don't actually succeed in doing so, or they do at an intermittent rate. Either way, they're unlikely to become free of glucose dependency in their training (keto diets are really hard for most people).

TLDR: Calories are only a piece of the puzzle, nutrients are more important, specifically the balance between them and to a lesser extent the timing of their intake.

PS: For simultaneous weight loss and muscle gain, one should be in a small-to-moderate caloric deficit, any more than that and you run the risk of sending your body into a fat saving mode with the added issue of it "eating" its own muscle mass for energy. My own daily maintenance level for calories would be around 3500 at my current rate of activity, I hover right around the 3000 mark currently. Note that it usually takes quite a bit longer to recomposition one's body than it does to bulk it up and then cut fat in separate cycles.



Mummelmann said:
shikamaru317 said:

That is probably why. I think I was eating like 2500 calories a day when attempting it, with only 2 protein shakes per day in addition to the normal protein in my diet. I seem to recall reading since then that you need like 3000+ calories a day, with 1 gram of protein per pound of body weight, in order to actually build muscle. 

It's usually about the balance of nutrients. While proteins are the building blocks for the expansion of muscle cells, carbs are the fuel (glucose). If your blood glucose levels are too low on average, and especially during or around workouts, you will not only see subpar performance but also a smaller degree of hypertrophy since low blood glucose typically means inhibited protein synthesis and thus less actual use of said building blocks. One of the most common dietary mistakes is not filling up the blood glucose levels after a workout, limiting the body's ability to and interest in building muscle. Strength gain is somewhat easier since it's more about neural adaptation than the actual size of the muscle itself (in other words; two muscles of roughly equal size can be neurally adapted to performing at completely different levels), but there is, of course, a connection between the size and strength of a muscle as well.

Proponents of keto diets will argue that one doesn't need carbs at all, or very little of it. The problem with that is that the majority of people who attempt to go into ketosis don't actually succeed in doing so, or they do at an intermittent rate. Either way, they're unlikely to become free of glucose dependency in their training (keto diets are really hard for most people).

TLDR: Calories are only a piece of the puzzle, nutrients are more important, specifically the balance between them and to a lesser extent the timing of their intake.

PS: For simultaneous weight loss and muscle gain, one should be in a small-to-moderate caloric deficit, any more than that and you run the risk of sending your body into a fat saving mode with the added issue of it "eating" its own muscle mass for energy. My own daily maintenance level for calories would be around 3500 at my current rate of activity, I hover right around the 3000 mark currently. Note that it usually takes quite a bit longer to recomposition one's body than it does to bulk it up and then cut fat in separate cycles.

It is not recommended for the underexperiended to attempt body recomposition. That is advanced along timing of macro intake. Keep it simple. 



I've tried a number of different fitness and diet regimens since my metabolism hit a brick wall around 20. Some worked better than others, but in the end I never ended up sustaining any of them long term. The closest I previously came to success was simply controlling portions and strength training at least twice a week; no supplements or any fancy shit. That's probably what I would have tried again before the pandemic hit. Losing work, staying indoors, and doing lots of home cooking caused me to gain a ton of weight in a short amount of time. Decided to recommit when I found that I could barely even put on my good slacks any more.

But what to do in the middle of a pandemic when you love food, hate deprivation, and mostly relied on the gym to stay in shape? After some tweaking it seems that - at least for me - the answer is intermittent fasting. I tried a more extreme version in the past to little success, but this version is doing wonders so far. Basically I don't eat until I get home for dinner and dessert. It's counterintuitive to everything you're told about lots of small meals and breakfast being the most important meal of the day and all that, but it's working great so far. I find my stomach mostly stays 'asleep' and doesn't bother me until I wake it up with food, so putting that off until the end of the day saves me a lot of calories. This way I'm able to eat what I want until I'm full, go to bed sated, and still lose weight. Been doing it consistently for about two months now without issue. We'll see if anything changes when I get lean but so far my cravings are minuscule and I'm much less lethargic than if I were eating normally. It's the easiest diet I've ever been on by far.

I've deliberately avoided constantly weighing myself this time but those same slacks I could barely get on before now barely stay on without a belt. I plan to keep this going indefinitely if possible. I don't plan on going back to the gym until next year but fortunately I seem to be holding on to most of the muscle I gained in the meantime. When I do go back, maybe I'll add an extra meal on workout days to reward and fuel myself. Regardless, I think I've got a system I can actually stick with this time.

Last edited by TallSilhouette - on 05 July 2020

Xxain said:
Mummelmann said:

It's usually about the balance of nutrients. While proteins are the building blocks for the expansion of muscle cells, carbs are the fuel (glucose). If your blood glucose levels are too low on average, and especially during or around workouts, you will not only see subpar performance but also a smaller degree of hypertrophy since low blood glucose typically means inhibited protein synthesis and thus less actual use of said building blocks. One of the most common dietary mistakes is not filling up the blood glucose levels after a workout, limiting the body's ability to and interest in building muscle. Strength gain is somewhat easier since it's more about neural adaptation than the actual size of the muscle itself (in other words; two muscles of roughly equal size can be neurally adapted to performing at completely different levels), but there is, of course, a connection between the size and strength of a muscle as well.

Proponents of keto diets will argue that one doesn't need carbs at all, or very little of it. The problem with that is that the majority of people who attempt to go into ketosis don't actually succeed in doing so, or they do at an intermittent rate. Either way, they're unlikely to become free of glucose dependency in their training (keto diets are really hard for most people).

TLDR: Calories are only a piece of the puzzle, nutrients are more important, specifically the balance between them and to a lesser extent the timing of their intake.

PS: For simultaneous weight loss and muscle gain, one should be in a small-to-moderate caloric deficit, any more than that and you run the risk of sending your body into a fat saving mode with the added issue of it "eating" its own muscle mass for energy. My own daily maintenance level for calories would be around 3500 at my current rate of activity, I hover right around the 3000 mark currently. Note that it usually takes quite a bit longer to recomposition one's body than it does to bulk it up and then cut fat in separate cycles.

It is not recommended for the underexperiended to attempt body recomposition. That is advanced along timing of macro intake. Keep it simple. 

It's not immensely complicated, but you do have a point. The caloric deficit should be roughly the same when you're simply aiming for weight loss as well though, a larger deficit will cause problems and won't really help anyone long term. And the contents of the calories matter a whole lot, even when not attempting body recomposition. I'd probably recommend straight up weight loss anyway for someone inexperienced, they would have the added benefit of building muscle really quickly once into the bulking phase.