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Forums - Gaming Discussion - So Motion Control was just a fever afterall?

Not being front and center of a generation =/= Dead.

The usability of motion control in VR is one of it's main selling point so it is pretty much alive. Not just that, Sony and Nintendo has plenty of games using the feature still or scale back to the use of gyro-aiming.



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Louie said:

Right now motion controls aren't front and center in most games even though there is a steady stream of releases that use them. 

I guess depending on what games someone plays, it can affect their perspective on motion controls.

I think the last game I played on PS4 that had motion control features was Infamous: Second Son (2014).
So it may be easy to think that they're not very prevalent if you don't see games that use them much.



Nintendo dropped motion controls last gen with the Wii U and paid dearly for it. A clear sign that the market continued to want motion controls, but Nintendo deliberately chose to backstab the market. Further evidence for the desire for motion controls has been the continued presence of Just Dance on the Wii which still got the yearly release in late 2019. This gen Nintendo reinstated motion controls as the standard with Switch, so they are here to stay, after all.

The last gen consoles of Sony and Microsoft (PS4 and Xbox One) tried to built on Move and Kinect, respectively. Sony's foray into VR has been commercially underwhelming, so it's no surprise that VR had no presence in the PS5 event earlier this month. Microsoft's Kinect is dead; which was inevitable, because unlike the Wii, it was a fad. Shipment progression of Kinect was 8m in 2010 (two months of availability), 10m in 2011, 4m in 2012, undisclosed in 2013. It was a thing for about one year, unlike the Wii which exceeded 10m units for five straight years; five years is the length of a generation.

Last edited by RolStoppable - on 28 June 2020

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Otter said:
PS5 comes preloaded with game which shows off the motion controls capabilities. I think we will see it more on PS5, then we did on PS4. They want the controller to be a strong distinguishing factor against Xbox.

Switch has a lot of titles which feature it, unfortunately though handheld play means that developers are not building games around motion controls.

But it's fun holding the switch upside down trying to make a trick shot in botw, contorting yourself to see what's going on. BotW fit edition :)

Motion controls are tricky on handhelds, especially while playing in a moving vehicle haha.



I buy all shooters on Switch mainly because they have gyro aiming where PS4 and X1 do not. In fact, it took some adjustments to get good at TLoU2 because of no gyro aiming for quick fine-tuned shots. It became apparent quick just how much I love the feature and miss it when it is not there.

Also I played arms exclusively with motion controls as well, and enjoyed it quite a bit. So nah, it is not dead. It is not a primary control method used these days, but motion controls still live in a variety of ways.



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Its future is mainly VR because it makes sense for VR experiences.

For "regular" gaming it's been relegated to basically an extra additive feature (like aiming/camera movement), virtually all console games have gone back to using buttons as the primary control input, even Switch games, there's very, very few that actually require motion control, 99.5% of the library can be played with standard button input.

It's good for gyro aiming mainly, but the number of "get up and swing the controller around!" games have become few and far in between. 

I remember people also used to say it would become standard in TV remote controls (motion controls) but that never even came close to becoming all that mainstream either.



Soundwave said:

Its future is mainly VR because it makes sense for VR experiences.

For "regular" gaming it's been relegated to basically an extra additive feature (like aiming/camera movement), virtually all console games have gone back to using buttons as the primary control input, even Switch games, there's very, very few that actually require motion control, 99.5% of the library can be played with standard button input.

It's good for gyro aiming mainly, but the number of "get up and swing the controller around!" games have become few and far in between. 

I remember people also used to say it would become standard in TV remote controls (motion controls) but that never even came close to becoming all that mainstream either.

What you talking about, I always have to wave the remote around for the stupid tv to see the infrared codes :p

Motion control for the sake of motion control has luckily left the building. Yet without motion control Beat Saber would simply not exist.



I've been shaking my DS4 to "fix" the flashlight in TLoU2 all week.....



Motion control can be great - but it needs to be utilized in the right way, for the right type of games. If we're talking - motion control being overemphasized and forced upon EVERYTHING, like the Wii, then yes - I think that was just a fad. But the tech certainly isn't going away. It'll just be more like rumble I think - more in the background as a way to supplement the controls of certain games, but not THE control method itself.



 

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DarthMetalliCube said:

Motion control can be great - but it needs to be utilized in the right way, for the right type of games. If we're talking - motion control being overemphasized and forced upon EVERYTHING, like the Wii, then yes - I think that was just a fad. But the tech certainly isn't going away. It'll just be more like rumble I think - more in the background as a way to supplement the controls of certain games, but not THE control method itself.

There's also VR as well, which is practically all motion. Really, Motion isn't dead, people just learned to use the tech better. Wii-era waggle gimmicks that sub-in for button presses are thankfully dead. But experiences like ARMS and Mario Odyssey's Cappy Controls will still be around, as will things like Gyro aiming.