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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Opinion: Rain in BOTW is a positive addition to the game

freebs2 said:
vivster said:

Realism should never get into the way of playability, especially if it's inconsistent. All I can say is that rain was the No1 factor why I stopped playing the game and that is just terrible game design. Sadly, the word "optional" doesn't exist in Nintendo's vocabulary.

"Here, have a gigantic world to explore with an all powerful and immortal protagonist who can wield magic and climb mountains for days without eating or sleeping. Oh BTW, that all powerful protagonist can't climb things that are slightly wet. Also, all weapons are made out of paper. Have fun!"

I don't agree having more options is always a good thing but I understand your point.

That said, I don't think rain and weapon degredation were meant for "realism" purposes but rather because the gameplay encourages adaptation rather than planning. And since the game always gives you more potential objectives I don't think rain has ever stopped my progress.

Maybe shouldn't have been a complete open world game then. Open world games always come with the promise of freedom. The freedom here is arbitrarily limited. This mechanic doesn't force you to adapt, it forces you to wait, because it's nothing but a temporary obstacle. And it's absolutely random and can hit you out of nowhere, that's not challenging because you had no chance to adapt. It just punishes you for playing the game.

If it's about adaptability they should've implemented raining seasons, where it is gonna rain for days and you can actually prepare for it. Starting to rain while I'm just in the process of climbing a big mountain isn't challenging me to adapt because there is no way to adapt. I'm in the middle of nowhere and suddenly I'm forced to stop doing what I'm doing for 5-10 minutes. How is that in any way challenging or engaging? It's just annoying. Imagine if they had done the same with winter. Suddenly it gets cold and you're fucked because you don't happen to carry the right items.

If there is a mechanic that has zero benefits other than annoying people, it's probably not a good thing to include. The game wouldn't have gotten a single point less on metacritic if it wasn't in the game, now imagine how many points it would've gotten more if it never existed. People love to overlook the flaws in the game because it's otherwise great, but that's not how things work. It's not great because of those flaws, but despite of them. They're still flaws and any attempt to excuse them is just silly.

Last edited by vivster - on 24 July 2019

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NightlyPoe said:
curl-6 said:

The answer is the same though; explore for an alternate route, or find a dry spot to camp out. I played BOTW for well over a hundred hours and never, not once, did I put my controller down and wait for the rain to stop.

I could have gone exploring, but I don't like to do that because Breath of the Wild is such a big game that I don't like to move on from a place until I find what I'm looking for.  Otherwise, who knows when I'll get back around to that place, if ever?  So, yeah, I put the controller down a couple times and just waited for the rain to stop.  It's easier than marking a map and hoping I remember to go back to it someday.

Hopefully the sequel will fix this flaw also, a map where you can actually tell where you've been would be nice.



Given that I think climbing is badly implemented at core level in the first place, rain on top of that just augments that.



NightlyPoe said:
curl-6 said:

If I just had to wait, I'd hate it, as I'm not a patient person, but I guess I don't really think of it as waiting as in searching for an alternate route I was still exploring and hence the gameplay never stopped for me. Not only did I usually get where I wanted to go, but I very often stumbled across something new along the way that I might otherwise have missed.

You keep mentioning alternate routes, but sometimes they just don't exist if you have to climb stuff.  The most memorable time that I got stuck time-locked by rain was when I tried to climb that pillar just outside of Kakariko Village with Silent Princesses on top.

And that was just a small peak.  I suppose later on I could have set a fire to get up there, but at the time, just starting out and didn't have the tools.  But there are plenty of points of interest much higher where even that's not an option.

Early in the game though, with almost the whole world to explore, even if I didn't find a way up I'd still be constantly covering new ground, and at the very least likely to find somewhere to start a campfire and skip the storm. I dunno, I guess I was just so involved in the game world that rather than seeing the rain as a stop sign I saw it as something to plan around. Later on of course, I not only got Revali's Gale, which meant it wasn't even a hindrance anymore, but also discovered the mean-spirited joy of taking advantage of the rain to stealth and electrify enemies.



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vivster said:
freebs2 said:

I don't agree having more options is always a good thing but I understand your point.

That said, I don't think rain and weapon degredation were meant for "realism" purposes but rather because the gameplay encourages adaptation rather than planning. And since the game always gives you more potential objectives I don't think rain has ever stopped my progress.

Maybe shouldn't have been a complete open world game then. Open world games always come with the promise of freedom. The freedom here is arbitrarily limited. This mechanic doesn't force you to adapt, it forces you to wait, because it's nothing but a temporary obstacle. And it's absolutely random and can hit you out of nowhere, that's not challenging because you had no chance to adapt. It just punishes you for playing the game.

If it's about adaptability they should've implemented raining seasons, where it is gonna rain for days and you can actually prepare for it. Starting to rain while I'm just in the process of climbing a big mountain isn't challenging me to adapt because there is no way to adapt. I'm in the middle of nowhere and suddenly I'm forced to stop doing what I'm doing for 5-10 minutes. How is that in any way challenging or engaging? It's just annoying. Imagine if they had done the same with winter. Suddenly it gets cold and you're fucked because you don't happen to carry the right items.

If there is a mechanic that has zero benefits other than annoying people, it's probably not a good thing to include. The game wouldn't have gotten a single point less on metacritic if it wasn't in the game, now imagine how many points it would've gotten more if it never existed. People love to overlook the flaws in the game because it's otherwise great, but that's not how things work. It's not great because of those flaws, but despite of them. They're still flaws and any attempt to excuse them is just silly.

I don't think I'm justifying anything because I don't consider rain an issue in the first place.

I agree the game has a fair share of flaws or mechanics that could be improved upon, but I don't consider rain one of them.

Rain is an impediment but it doesn't stop your progress since in most cases you can reach your point of interest by an alternate route. Even in the ulikely event you can't reach a specific place can always point it on map and come to it later.

As I said there are always multiple objectives and point of interest to visit at any time, plus everything in the game is optional so you don't have any incentive to focus on a single objective while excluding the others.



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I didn't mind the rain in BotW really. I would always find another path to use, hunt for some food, stumble unto Korok seeds I wouldn't have found if I had gone the way I intended at first. Also, I think it's used brillantly on the way to Zora's Domain, the constant rain guides you seamlessly to use the road where you get some lore from the big stones and some great fights against Lizalfos using lightning arrows. It makes the trek to Zora's Domain almost feel like a dungeon.



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TruckOSaurus said:
I didn't mind the rain in BotW really. I would always find another path to use, hunt for some food, stumble unto Korok seeds I wouldn't have found if I had gone the way I intended at first. Also, I think it's used brillantly on the way to Zora's Domain, the constant rain guides you seamlessly to use the road where you get some lore from the big stones and some great fights against Lizalfos using lightning arrows. It makes the trek to Zora's Domain almost feel like a dungeon.

I've skipped most of that path to Zora's - I managed to climb and mostly bypass it all. That was the first time I've started to hate the way climbing was implemented in game.



It's a fun mechanic y'all.

Especially when you add thunder to the mix - what's better than throwing a metal weapon to a bokoblin, have then pick it up, and then watch it get struck by lightning?

I like dynamic weather in games, especially when they provide gameplay opportunities.



It never bothered me and I always knew it was coming thanks to the "weather app" on Link's cell phone.



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I like the rain as well as the weapon breaking aspect.

Both are subtle ways of making the player explore the game more.

Going somewhere in a game. So easy to beeline it there. It starts raining in BotW and you may find you have to alter your route cause you can't climb over something you were planning to. On this alternate route you see something interesting and explore that. It helps one explore the world more. Just as breakable weapons helps one explore the many options of weapons out there.