Forums - Gaming Discussion - Google Stadia conference with pricing, games, and release details set for June 6th at Noon EST/ 9 AM PST

jason1637 said:
Mar1217 said:
Last month it was Digital only consoles, now it's streaming based ones ...

Well, can't wait for the drop in attention once the real party comes in, they'll be forgotten soon enough when the others will come on stage.

Stadia has always been a streaming service.

Hmm ... was that comment made in relation to the first line ?

Sorry, I guess you misunderstood. I was talking about how not so long ago all the talk was about how of a good prospect an all-digital console could look like, then Microsoft fucked it up and we ended up with an underwhelming product that nobody wanted, thus any speculations on that end kinda stopped. Now it seems we could see the same trajectory here with Stadia.



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May it fail spectacularly. Starting with this conference, which I hope is swallowed by the Earth.



Chinese food for breakfast

 

I believe this will fail and fail hard.



Lol

People go ”4K 60 fps streaming blah blah blah”, don’t seem to realize ping times, compression both delay and artifacts and decoding latency is a thing.



Spindel said:
Lol

People go ”4K 60 fps streaming blah blah blah”, don’t seem to realize ping times, compression both delay and artifacts and decoding latency is a thing.

They don't realize it and they don't care either.



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I'll leave this here, my prediction is that Stadia will be a similar experience:

From WikiPedia:

"In examining latency, Eurogamer's Digital Foundry initial test found that in some of their test scenarios, users of OnLive could expect 150ms of latency over a consumer Internet connection; however, they also noted inconsistencies, in that some games had higher latency, and that this would also depend on the quality of the customer's internet connection.[72] Furthermore, they also noted that while acceptable, these values ran contrary to figures suggested by OnLive before release of lag "being under 80ms" and "usually... between 35-40ms".[72] In their later full-feature article on OnLive, Digital Foundry noted that "during intense gameplay, OnLive is hovering right at the boundary of what is acceptable lag and often exceeds it, resulting in a variable, often unsatisfactory experience", but that "the latency level is probably the most pleasant surprise with this system. Let's be clear: it is most definitely not a replacement for the local experience, but if the system can be tightened up and that 150ms becomes the norm, then it's clear there is potential here for the infrastructure to find a home with certain types of game or certain types of player".[73]

In terms of video quality, Digital Foundry noted that video compression meant image quality also varied depending on the title. Games with a lower number of frame-to-frame differences, or games where such changes were less important, such as Assassin's Creed II or Batman: Arkham Asylum fared well, with these games being "strongly suited to video compression" and "cut-scenes in particular can look very good". However, games that had a greater amount of motion or relied on fast reactions, such as Colin McRae: Dirt, Dirt 3 or Unreal Tournament 3 fared less well, with questions about the playability of the latter when video compression artifacts were taken into account.[74] Digital Foundry felt that the quality of rendering was mostly good, with high frame rates, but with less consistency than console counterparts and with screen-tearing in some scenarios.[75]

Gaming Examiner judged that the graphics were like "playing a PlayStation 3 on a 480p standard [definition] TV", that they thought that they experienced much lower framerates than expected, and that the controller was not working reliably.[76]

After the launch in United Kingdom, Computer and Video Games remarked that, after one month of use, the service was "working" and was adequate for trying or renting a game, but that it was not a substitute for owning a game on another platform due to the limitations imposed by internet connections (lag, freezing and smeary visuals, as well as high data usage for those on capped connections).[77]"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OnLive

For the supporters of this I hope I'm wrong. But I was sceptical before OnLive launched and in that case I was proven right and as I said Stadia will be simmilar.



Spindel said:

I'll leave this here, my prediction is that Stadia will be a similar experience:

From WikiPedia:

"In examining latency, Eurogamer's Digital Foundry initial test found that in some of their test scenarios, users of OnLive could expect 150ms of latency over a consumer Internet connection; however, they also noted inconsistencies, in that some games had higher latency, and that this would also depend on the quality of the customer's internet connection.[72] Furthermore, they also noted that while acceptable, these values ran contrary to figures suggested by OnLive before release of lag "being under 80ms" and "usually... between 35-40ms".[72] In their later full-feature article on OnLive, Digital Foundry noted that "during intense gameplay, OnLive is hovering right at the boundary of what is acceptable lag and often exceeds it, resulting in a variable, often unsatisfactory experience", but that "the latency level is probably the most pleasant surprise with this system. Let's be clear: it is most definitely not a replacement for the local experience, but if the system can be tightened up and that 150ms becomes the norm, then it's clear there is potential here for the infrastructure to find a home with certain types of game or certain types of player".[73]

In terms of video quality, Digital Foundry noted that video compression meant image quality also varied depending on the title. Games with a lower number of frame-to-frame differences, or games where such changes were less important, such as Assassin's Creed II or Batman: Arkham Asylum fared well, with these games being "strongly suited to video compression" and "cut-scenes in particular can look very good". However, games that had a greater amount of motion or relied on fast reactions, such as Colin McRae: Dirt, Dirt 3 or Unreal Tournament 3 fared less well, with questions about the playability of the latter when video compression artifacts were taken into account.[74] Digital Foundry felt that the quality of rendering was mostly good, with high frame rates, but with less consistency than console counterparts and with screen-tearing in some scenarios.[75]

Gaming Examiner judged that the graphics were like "playing a PlayStation 3 on a 480p standard [definition] TV", that they thought that they experienced much lower framerates than expected, and that the controller was not working reliably.[76]

After the launch in United Kingdom, Computer and Video Games remarked that, after one month of use, the service was "working" and was adequate for trying or renting a game, but that it was not a substitute for owning a game on another platform due to the limitations imposed by internet connections (lag, freezing and smeary visuals, as well as high data usage for those on capped connections).[77]"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OnLive

For the supporters of this I hope I'm wrong. But I was sceptical before OnLive launched and in that case I was proven right and as I said Stadia will be simmilar.

While I'm highly critical on anything network related I have to point out that these reviews of the service are from 8 years ago. The internet has drastically improved since then. We're also talking about google here and not some startup. The circumstances are vastly different now and if google takes this service seriously it could become something great.

The fact that they're connecting the controller directly to the internet instead of just using a wifi connection to the device you're playing on shows me that they're approaching this service properly and are willing to improve the whole concept instead of just doing "another one".



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.

Spindel said:

I'll leave this here, my prediction is that Stadia will be a similar experience:

From WikiPedia:

"In examining latency, Eurogamer's Digital Foundry initial test found that in some of their test scenarios, users of OnLive could expect 150ms of latency over a consumer Internet connection; however, they also noted inconsistencies, in that some games had higher latency, and that this would also depend on the quality of the customer's internet connection.[72] Furthermore, they also noted that while acceptable, these values ran contrary to figures suggested by OnLive before release of lag "being under 80ms" and "usually... between 35-40ms".[72] In their later full-feature article on OnLive, Digital Foundry noted that "during intense gameplay, OnLive is hovering right at the boundary of what is acceptable lag and often exceeds it, resulting in a variable, often unsatisfactory experience", but that "the latency level is probably the most pleasant surprise with this system. Let's be clear: it is most definitely not a replacement for the local experience, but if the system can be tightened up and that 150ms becomes the norm, then it's clear there is potential here for the infrastructure to find a home with certain types of game or certain types of player".[73]

In terms of video quality, Digital Foundry noted that video compression meant image quality also varied depending on the title. Games with a lower number of frame-to-frame differences, or games where such changes were less important, such as Assassin's Creed II or Batman: Arkham Asylum fared well, with these games being "strongly suited to video compression" and "cut-scenes in particular can look very good". However, games that had a greater amount of motion or relied on fast reactions, such as Colin McRae: Dirt, Dirt 3 or Unreal Tournament 3 fared less well, with questions about the playability of the latter when video compression artifacts were taken into account.[74] Digital Foundry felt that the quality of rendering was mostly good, with high frame rates, but with less consistency than console counterparts and with screen-tearing in some scenarios.[75]

Gaming Examiner judged that the graphics were like "playing a PlayStation 3 on a 480p standard [definition] TV", that they thought that they experienced much lower framerates than expected, and that the controller was not working reliably.[76]

After the launch in United Kingdom, Computer and Video Games remarked that, after one month of use, the service was "working" and was adequate for trying or renting a game, but that it was not a substitute for owning a game on another platform due to the limitations imposed by internet connections (lag, freezing and smeary visuals, as well as high data usage for those on capped connections).[77]"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OnLive

For the supporters of this I hope I'm wrong. But I was sceptical before OnLive launched and in that case I was proven right and as I said Stadia will be simmilar.

Digital Foundry also tested Google Stadia when it was in beta known as Project Stream. They found Project Stream’s latency to be much faster than OnLive, and that was only a beta, latency will likely be even better on the final release. Will latency be amazing? Of course not, I would never use it for multiplayer games for that very reason, but it should be low enough for most single player games. I was in the Project Stream beta and barely noticed any additional lag while streaming AC Odyssey compared to playing it on my PS4 Pro.



shikamaru317 said:
Spindel said:

I'll leave this here, my prediction is that Stadia will be a similar experience:

From WikiPedia:

"In examining latency, Eurogamer's Digital Foundry initial test found that in some of their test scenarios, users of OnLive could expect 150ms of latency over a consumer Internet connection; however, they also noted inconsistencies, in that some games had higher latency, and that this would also depend on the quality of the customer's internet connection.[72] Furthermore, they also noted that while acceptable, these values ran contrary to figures suggested by OnLive before release of lag "being under 80ms" and "usually... between 35-40ms".[72] In their later full-feature article on OnLive, Digital Foundry noted that "during intense gameplay, OnLive is hovering right at the boundary of what is acceptable lag and often exceeds it, resulting in a variable, often unsatisfactory experience", but that "the latency level is probably the most pleasant surprise with this system. Let's be clear: it is most definitely not a replacement for the local experience, but if the system can be tightened up and that 150ms becomes the norm, then it's clear there is potential here for the infrastructure to find a home with certain types of game or certain types of player".[73]

In terms of video quality, Digital Foundry noted that video compression meant image quality also varied depending on the title. Games with a lower number of frame-to-frame differences, or games where such changes were less important, such as Assassin's Creed II or Batman: Arkham Asylum fared well, with these games being "strongly suited to video compression" and "cut-scenes in particular can look very good". However, games that had a greater amount of motion or relied on fast reactions, such as Colin McRae: Dirt, Dirt 3 or Unreal Tournament 3 fared less well, with questions about the playability of the latter when video compression artifacts were taken into account.[74] Digital Foundry felt that the quality of rendering was mostly good, with high frame rates, but with less consistency than console counterparts and with screen-tearing in some scenarios.[75]

Gaming Examiner judged that the graphics were like "playing a PlayStation 3 on a 480p standard [definition] TV", that they thought that they experienced much lower framerates than expected, and that the controller was not working reliably.[76]

After the launch in United Kingdom, Computer and Video Games remarked that, after one month of use, the service was "working" and was adequate for trying or renting a game, but that it was not a substitute for owning a game on another platform due to the limitations imposed by internet connections (lag, freezing and smeary visuals, as well as high data usage for those on capped connections).[77]"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OnLive

For the supporters of this I hope I'm wrong. But I was sceptical before OnLive launched and in that case I was proven right and as I said Stadia will be simmilar.

Digital Foundry also tested Google Stadia when it was in beta known as Project Stream. They found Project Stream’s latency to be much faster than OnLive, and that was only a beta, latency will likely be even better on the final release. Will latency be amazing? Of course not, I would never use it for multiplayer games for that very reason, but it should be low enough for most single player games. I was in the Project Stream beta and barely noticed any additional lag while streaming AC Odyssey compared to playing it on my PS4 Pro.

Digital Foundrys latencies on Stadia and Google Stream:

  • Google Stadia: 166ms
  • Google Project Stream: 179ms



Spindel said:

Digital Foundrys latencies on Stadia and Google Stream:

  • Google Stadia: 166ms
  • Google Project Stream: 179ms

https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-2019-hands-on-with-google-stream-gdc-2019

Xbox 1 X: 166ms

PC 60fps: 100ms

PC 30fps: 133ms

withholding the other results makes you look like an ideologist, especially when you have so many good/good faith arguments in your favor