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Should Capcom try a "Capcom 5" again?

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Back in the day, Capcom boasted some of the most creative and ambitious gaming talent in Japan next to Sega and Nintendo. They'd take a simple idea, inject enough insanity and depth into it, and polish it up to perfection. A Blue Robot with an arm gun that can steal other robots powers? Cool. A game where martal arts experts across the globe duke it out? Done deal. A survival horror game with a rotating cast of characters who fight off a zombie plague from an evil corporation? whatever floats you. Some white-haired anti-hero who unleashes absolute hell on any demon who challenges him? Neat. No idea was too weird for the company. But as game development costs grew, and the company's financial status started to crumble, Capcom began to take fewer creative risks, and the company started scaling back its once prolific output on consoles, in favor of its established safe-bets.

One of the last major peaks of creativity for Capcom, was the Capcom 5. A 5 game deal with Nintendo to develop and publish 5 unique, and original titles, all exclusive to the Nintendo GameCube. These 5 games were, P.N.03, Viewtiful Joe, Dead Phoenix, Killer 7, and Resident Evil 4. Shinji Mikami, creator of Resident Evil, headed the project, and things seemed to go according to plan at first. But Capcom's declining revenue, the GameCube's poor sales, and mis-management killed the deal before it had any real chance to thrive. Dead Phoenix was cancelled, P.N.03 was rushed out the door, and VJ, Killer 7, and Resident Evil 4 were all ported to the PlayStation 2.

Today, Capcom has tried to rebuild itself by doubling down on competing with western AAA developers using their Big IP like Resident Evil and Monster Hunter, with remasters of its older catalog spruced in between. But as recent as late-last year, the company has expressed interest in the idea of workshoping new, original IP using a lower-budget and a digital release. The idea is that at least of these concepts stick, and can be nourished into a bigger property overtime, similar to what Ninja Theory did with Hellblade. With that in mind, you think its time for Capcom to try its hand at another "Capcom 5" of sorts? A collective of a handful of original, lower budget titles, released on consoles and PC, with the hope that some of them can make it big in the future.

Last edited by TheMisterManGuy - on 24 June 2019

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Why is concept exclusive to CAPCOM? All developers should do this. Most Japanese developers are.



The Capcom 5, I remember that. It back fired pretty bad too. I remember how much GC fans were bragging. And ultimately Dead Phoenix was canned. PN03 was terrible. Killer 7 was interesting, but not great. RE4 went to the ps4 and so did Viewtiful.



Chrkeller said:
The Capcom 5, I remember that. It back fired pretty bad too. I remember how much GC fans were bragging. And ultimately Dead Phoenix was canned. PN03 was terrible. Killer 7 was interesting, but not great. RE4 went to the ps4 and so did Viewtiful.

No wonder the GC sold poorly, the PS4 was already on the market !!

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Xxain said:
Why is concept exclusive to CAPCOM? All developers should do this. Most Japanese developers are.

I'm bringing up Capcom because they themselves pitched this idea, and they haven't put out a single new IP this entire generation.



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TheMisterManGuy said:

Back in the day, Capcom boasted some of the most creative and ambitious gaming talent in Japan next to Sega and Nintendo. They'd take a simple idea, inject enough insanity and depth into it, and polish it up to perfection. A Blue Robot with an arm gun that can steal other robots powers? Cool. A game where martal arts experts across the globe duke it out? Done deal. A survival horror game with a rotating cast of characters who fight off a zombie plague from an evil corporation? whatever floats you. Some white-haired anti-hero who unleashes absolute hell on any demon who challenges him? Neat. No idea was too weird for the company. But as game development costs grew, and the company's financial status started to crumble, Capcom began to take fewer creative risks, and the company started scaling back its once prolific output on consoles, in favor of its established safe-bets.

One of the last major peaks of creativity for Capcom, was the Capcom 5. A 5 game deal with Nintendo to develop and publish 5 unique, and original titles, all exclusive to the Nintendo GameCube. These 5 games were, P.N.03, Viewtiful Joe, Dead Phoenix, Killer 7, and Resident Evil 4. Shinji Mikami, creator of Resident Evil, headed the project, and things seemed to go according to plan at first. But Capcom's declining revenue, the GameCube's poor sales, and mis-management killed the deal before it had any real chance to thrive. Dead Phoenix was cancelled, P.N.03 was rushed out the door, and VJ, Killer 7, and Resident Evil 4 were all ported to the PlayStation 2.

Today, Capcom has tried to rebuild itself by doubling down on competing with western AAA developers using their Big IP like Resident Evil and Monster Hunter, with remasters of its older catalog spruced in between. But as recent as late-last year, the company has expressed interest in the idea of workshoping new, original IP using a lower-budget and a digital release. The idea is that at least of these concepts stick, and can be nourished into a bigger property overtime, similar to what Ninja Theory did with Hellblade. With that in mind, you think its time for Capcom to try its hand at another "Capcom 5" of sorts? A collective of a handful of original, lower budget titles, released on consoles and PC, with the hope that some of them can make it big in the future.

The Switch is probably the system they could try that with, because it is a less extreme system. Do a couple of more niche or specific titles (say, Darkstalkers or something). 

Less overhead costs if you fail, and if you succeed you succeed, and can probably get more money later porting them a la Octopath Traveler. 



The Democratic Nintendo fan....is that a paradox? I'm fond of one of the more conservative companies in the industry, but I vote Liberally and view myself that way 90% of the time?

The Guild games from Level 5 on the 3DS showed a lot of creativity. Attack of the Friday Monsters is among my most beloved games. I also very much like Crimson Shroud and Weapon Shop de Omasse. But all these games show a lot of creativity. I think every big company needs a series of games to let their creative juices go wild. Let the Capcom 5 and Guild games coming from everyone.



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KrspaceT said:

The Switch is probably the system they could try that with, because it is a less extreme system. Do a couple of more niche or specific titles (say, Darkstalkers or something). 

Less overhead costs if you fail, and if you succeed you succeed, and can probably get more money later porting them a la Octopath Traveler. 

The Switch is especially conducive to these types of games. It's simple hardware and mobile nature lends well to games you can pick up and put down with ease. And like you said, if they succeed, it can be ported later. Of course, the Switch isn't the only platform they can do this with, but it's a good place to start for it.



What you describe as the Capcom 5 and what question you ask at the end are two very different things. One was a very specific deal in a particular time period as a way to release games for a more understated console - which ended up backfiring, and one is just asking if they should make new IPs. Not really the same thing, especially considering the Capcom 5 included Resident Evil 4, though it was focused on original IPs mostly. So I'm not sure why the idea has to be in regards to the Capcom 5? Doesn't really make sense.

But yeah, new IPs would be cool, more major companies need to focus on brand new properties.



AngryLittleAlchemist said:
What you describe as the Capcom 5 and what question you ask at the end are two very different things. One was a very specific deal in a particular time period as a way to release games for a more understated console - which ended up backfiring, and one is just asking if they should make new IPs. Not really the same thing, especially considering the Capcom 5 included Resident Evil 4, though it was focused on original IPs mostly. So I'm not sure why the idea has to be in regards to the Capcom 5? Doesn't really make sense.

But yeah, new IPs would be cool, more major companies need to focus on brand new properties.

It's not just new IP I'm asking for. But new IP that are unique and different from everything on the market. Capcom 5 was exactly that. Fresh, unique concepts many developers wouldn't have touched with a ten foot pole. Something like that, but on modern platforms and smaller budgets than the AAA stuff would be nice to see.