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Forums - Gaming Discussion - How to combat scalpers

One of the easiest ways to combat console scalping is to ship a disproportionate amount to brick and mortar retailers and less to online retailers.  The scalpers are the ones who are going to take the time to set up bots to instantly purchase consoles as soon as they are available.  On the other hand, it's a lot more effort to go to every brick and mortar place and buy up a system.  Physical retailers also have an incentive to sell 1 system per person, since they make money on games and not hardware.  Physical retailers also seem to be more proactive to make bundles with the hardware, so that people have to spend more to get a system.  All of these things discourage scalping.

Basically, Amazon and Ebay are the biggest contributors to scalping.  If the big 3 sent more systems to Amazon's major competitors it would reduce the scalping problem by quite a bit.



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IcaroRibeiro said:

1. Not buying from them

Obviously not buying from them would be the best option, but we all know that's not going to happen. So instead of relying on the customers to somehow do a dogecoin level of unity, companies could strike back with a plan instead of just biting their thumb. 



Shatts said:
IcaroRibeiro said:

1. Not buying from them

Obviously not buying from them would be the best option, but we all know that's not going to happen. So instead of relying on the customers to somehow do a dogecoin level of unity, companies could strike back with a plan instead of just biting their thumb. 

It's in a issue customers themselves created so I can only shrug. 

I personally find entertaining to see 40 years old adults ranging like pre-teens because they can't find a console. 



The best way to beat them (as a consumer) is to get to know someone at a local store. Make friends with a manager, or employee. Then, when that thing is about to launch, they will likely give you a heads up etc. Failing that, you can always just pester a local store relentlessly until the person in charge gets so sick of you, they make sure you get what you want. Either way, you win. The scalper loses.

The key though, is to avoid online shopping at all costs.



Shatts said:
IcaroRibeiro said:

1. Not buying from them

Obviously not buying from them would be the best option, but we all know that's not going to happen. So instead of relying on the customers to somehow do a dogecoin level of unity, companies could strike back with a plan instead of just biting their thumb. 

So we should expect people not to have self control???  



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Cobretti2 said:
Pemalite said:

Sometimes it's not even the scalpers that are using predatory practices.

Second hand stores are selling the Xbox Series X and Playstation 5 for $1,100 AUD... Which is a big step up over the $750 retail price.

It's absolutely criminal... Ironically those are stores I refuse to support going forward out of principle.

I've seen Instagram channels where people whinge about these stores that there are no bargains but at the same time they have other videos where they found bargains in those stores and boast about flipping said items on eBay lol.

Which such because genuine people that struggle financially can't get genuine bargains no more/

Usually I am not looking for a bargain at these stores, but rather something specific that can't be bought brand new.
I.E. Recently purchased a 4:3 aspect 1280x1024 LED LCD monitor for $5 AUD as it should be a good pairing with the old 3dfx voodoo 2 PC I have as CRT's don't exist in any form. (Although I might try and source a second Voodoo 2 for SLI.)

But, they are using predatory pricing so they lost me as a customer out of principle. Got to stand with my morals, I believe these stores are needed to support lower income families... And they have lost focus of that in my opinion.

JackHandy said:

The best way to beat them (as a consumer) is to get to know someone at a local store. Make friends with a manager, or employee. Then, when that thing is about to launch, they will likely give you a heads up etc. Failing that, you can always just pester a local store relentlessly until the person in charge gets so sick of you, they make sure you get what you want. Either way, you win. The scalper loses.

The key though, is to avoid online shopping at all costs.

Ironically this is how I got the Xbox Series X and Playstation 5 on release day, the manager personally bought and set aside the consoles just for me.
I was loyal to the store, plus we all got to know each other on a first-name basis. - Also helps that I had to do a few legitimate rescues at the front of their store over the years which probably put me in good standing.

Even bought them all a round of coffee's a few times.
It's the small things that can make someones day.



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

The best way to fight scalpes is to not be in a hurry to buy anything. FOMO is the scalpers' prime tool above anything else.



You know it deserves the GOTY.

Come join The 2018 Obscure Game Monthly Review Thread.

Shatts said:
IcaroRibeiro said:

1. Not buying from them

Obviously not buying from them would be the best option, but we all know that's not going to happen. So instead of relying on the customers to somehow do a dogecoin level of unity, companies could strike back with a plan instead of just biting their thumb. 

Why would the "companies strike back"?  If scalpers are buying up all available stock the companies have made their money and the scalpers have now assumed the risk of an item not selling at a profit.

Personally I got away from day one console purchases back in the PS2 era with the exception of the Switch, Wii, and WiiU.  Bought the PS2 once the slim version came out.  Bought the PS3 off Ebay with extra controllers and lots of games for way less than MSRP (used is risky but that PS3 is still kicking). The PS4s (I've bought 3 ) I've bought new but long after they were readily available at retail.  Since I couldn't find a PS5 and my Vader PS4 bit the dust i bought a PS4Pro used.  When the PS5 is a normal sight in retail I'll probably wait for a Black Friday sale and buy one for the kids and maybe one for me. Personally I will not pay scalper prices, hell I don't even like paying full MSRP.



Chrkeller said:
Shatts said:

Obviously not buying from them would be the best option, but we all know that's not going to happen. So instead of relying on the customers to somehow do a dogecoin level of unity, companies could strike back with a plan instead of just biting their thumb. 

So we should expect people not to have self control???  

How did you conclude to that.



The_Yoda said:
Shatts said:

Obviously not buying from them would be the best option, but we all know that's not going to happen. So instead of relying on the customers to somehow do a dogecoin level of unity, companies could strike back with a plan instead of just biting their thumb. 

Why would the "companies strike back"?  If scalpers are buying up all available stock the companies have made their money and the scalpers have now assumed the risk of an item not selling at a profit.

Personally I got away from day one console purchases back in the PS2 era with the exception of the Switch, Wii, and WiiU.  Bought the PS2 once the slim version came out.  Bought the PS3 off Ebay with extra controllers and lots of games for way less than MSRP (used is risky but that PS3 is still kicking). The PS4s (I've bought 3 ) I've bought new but long after they were readily available at retail.  Since I couldn't find a PS5 and my Vader PS4 bit the dust i bought a PS4Pro used.  When the PS5 is a normal sight in retail I'll probably wait for a Black Friday sale and buy one for the kids and maybe one for me. Personally I will not pay scalper prices, hell I don't even like paying full MSRP.

Bruh plz use common sense, research or at least read before giving an opinion. Companies sell their consoles at a loss, Microsoft hasn't been able to profit from the hardware alone, Sony only starts to profit after a while, and Nintendo sold some at a loss as well in the past. The reason they do this is to create a bigger userbase, it's a strategical loss. They can recoup the loss by selling software, subscription service, etc. It was said that Sony needed to sell 10 games per console to recoup the loss back in the PS3 era. The reason for this being the PS3 sold at a huge loss. So with that in mind, obviously companies aren't fond of scalpers either. Not only does it limit the userbase, but it also stays untouched. Scalpers aren't making companies money, in fact the company are only losing money. Plus if people buy from the scalpers, that's extra potential money gone that could have gone to their games. 

Revenue does not equal profit. You can have the highest revenue in the world, but your company could still be failing.