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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Your thoughts on the Next Ninty Console

Will be in the same switch like console.
The same screen size, but with smaller bezels
Improvements on joycon. each side has 1 handle, but can open to 2 handles when using a single joycon, and would look like a normal controller. (id have to draw, because is difficult to explain...)
In the technology, They will keep the tegra line with better chips on smaller dies.
1080p display on the screen, but the dock will feature the DLSS of NVIDIA (that is available now on RTX 20xx cards), because they can improve the resolution post rendering using AI. So, 1080 on HH, 4k with AI on dock.
Full BC.

dock would be more expensive, though. So it will be launched in 2 skus, one with dock, and other without it (although, it would have a mini hdmi port to output the 1080p image to screen even with no dock). 400$ for the switch 2 4K and 250$ for switch 2 with no dock. 2024.



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curl-6 said:

Here's my problem with this "update every 2-3 years" idea; I don't want games in 2020 and 2021 to run like shit on my base Switch. I paid $479 for my system, I want at least a good 5 years of support from it without being forced to buy gimped, choppy versions of games that come out after the Switch 1.5, fuck that shit.

Pemalite said:

That's just it. We compare the 3DS against other mobile platforms... And in such comparisons, the 3DS doesn't seem as nearly as dated.
Same should go for the Switch.

...But once you start pitting it against the Xbox One/Playstation 4/PC, then its' limitations quickly becomes apparent... And that is perfectly fine.

Switch was behind Playstation/Xbox/PC from day one though, so people have already accepted that its not graphically competitive, they knew that when they bought it. As such, I think that's a pill the general audience has already swallowed and that it falling even further behind visually just isn't a big deal.

The thing about PC gaming is that the number of people who care about the highest-fidelity graphics as a selling point began to decline quite a while ago. 8-bit and 16-bit games have had a surge in popularity in the last few years. The majority of the top-selling Steam games have kind of a "Wii/PS2 HD" look to them - that is, they are clearly higher resolution than a Wii or a PS2 game, but no more detailed... some of them look like Dreamcast HD games. I do think people began turning away from the graphics race as early as the PS2 era, and certainly by the Wii era.



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

curl-6 said:
Soundwave said:

The DS era was a different time, people were easier to impress, the full weight of what Apple was about to do and the smartphone industry had not really shaped people's expectations. 

So something like the OG DS to DS Lite was considered an impressive change for 2006, but that's 12 years ago.

The 3DS revisions ... every single one of them basically resulted in no sales boost, and in many cases it actually resulted in a decline. 

Past that, I don't even think the 5-6 year cycle works for Nintendo, it was a set up born out of the 1980s when Nintendo had 100% third party support and could easily have 5 years of content. 

In the post Playstation era where Nintendo doesn't get that anymore and has to rely on basically 7 or 8 main franchises to sell a platform ... it's hard to not be tapped out of content even by year 3. The Switch for example will have used up basically all the A/B-tier Nintendo franchises by the end of 2019 (3D Mario, 2D Mario, Zelda, Pokemon, PLG, Mario Kart, Splatoon, Animal Crossing, Fire Emblem). It's not a coincidence most Nintendo hardware sales really start to decline by year 4/5 of their hardware cycles, because that hardware cycle was never designed to be a setup where the system was mainly sold by Nintendo games. The NES and SNES were not like that. 

Switch is not the 3DS, it's selling as well at $300 as 3DS did at a $170. There's a lot of interest in various hardware revisions of the original Switch.

As for "they won't have any more system sellers after year 3", even if that were true, a Switch 1.5 in 2020 and every 2 years thereafter doesn't solve that anyway.

The Switch is selling because it's *not* the 3DS. It is not some low level game machine that relies a lot on kids. By going higher tier with the Switch you have a more compelling product that's resulting in better sales. 

If you do the whole "lets just ride this platform into the ground until it's badly outdated" thing that's not going to work for the Switch. Switch is a different kind of platform from the DS/3DS/GB lines, if Nintendo tried to make a "4DS" today it probably wouldn't even hit 50 million. Reason being smart phone games have really cannibalized the kids and budget market. The 3DS still has some sway there, but it's a small market. 

The higher end market is where it's at for Nintendo, that's where you have a device that does things you can't really get on a smartphone or tablet and they need to keep IMO at least a 1 generation gap minimum between the Switch the other home consoles. If you let Sony/MS stretch it to 2 generations difference, the gap is too large and the Switch will lose credibility as a hybrid console and really just be a glorified portable that has a TV out. So when Sony/MS go to PS5/XB2, Nintendo needs to introduce a Switch that is in the PS4/XB1 tier at least. 

Otherwise the Switch brand is going to lose luster, it's not going to work as a "well now it's a cheap little Game Boy" type thing!. You cannot have revisions that are just weaksauce and think people in this day and age are gonna get too excited. Who really got that excited about that New 3DS, nobody. 13 years ago that kind of thing is impressive, but today, nah. Consumers are more savvy and want some real sizzle on that steak. 

Last edited by Soundwave - on 28 November 2018

Soundwave said:
curl-6 said:

Switch is not the 3DS, it's selling as well at $300 as 3DS did at a $170. There's a lot of interest in various hardware revisions of the original Switch.

As for "they won't have any more system sellers after year 3", even if that were true, a Switch 1.5 in 2020 and every 2 years thereafter doesn't solve that anyway.

The Switch is selling because it's *not* the 3DS. It is not some low level game machine that relies a lot on kids. By going higher tier with the Switch you have a more compelling product that's resulting in better sales. 

If you do the whole "lets just ride this platform into the ground until it's badly outdated" thing that's not going to work for the Switch. Switch is a different kind of platform from the DS/3DS/GB lines, if Nintendo tried to make a "4DS" today it probably wouldn't even hit 50 million. Reason being smart phone games have really cannibalized the kids and budget market. The 3DS still has some sway there, but it's a small market. 

The higher end market is where it's at for Nintendo, that's where you have a device that does things you can't really get on a smartphone or tablet and they need to keep IMO at least a 1 generation gap minimum between the Switch the other home consoles. If you let Sony/MS stretch it to 2 generations difference, the gap is too large and the Switch will lose credibility as a hybrid console and really just be a glorified portable that has a TV out. So when Sony/MS go to PS5/XB2, Nintendo needs to introduce a Switch that is in the PS4/XB1 tier at least. 

Otherwise the Switch brand is going to lose luster, it's not going to work as a "well now it's a cheap little Game Boy type thing!". 

The Switch isn't high end though, it never was, from day 1 it was technically behind the competition. People aren't buying it for its graphics, two of its biggest sellers are Wii U games.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

Soundwave said:
curl-6 said:

Switch is not the 3DS, it's selling as well at $300 as 3DS did at a $170. There's a lot of interest in various hardware revisions of the original Switch.

As for "they won't have any more system sellers after year 3", even if that were true, a Switch 1.5 in 2020 and every 2 years thereafter doesn't solve that anyway.

The Switch is selling because it's *not* the 3DS. It is not some low level game machine that relies a lot on kids. By going higher tier with the Switch you have a more compelling product that's resulting in better sales. 

If you do the whole "lets just ride this platform into the ground until it's badly outdated" thing that's not going to work for the Switch. Switch is a different kind of platform from the DS/3DS/GB lines, if Nintendo tried to make a "4DS" today it probably wouldn't even hit 50 million. Reason being smart phone games have really cannibalized the kids and budget market. The 3DS still has some sway there, but it's a small market. 

The higher end market is where it's at for Nintendo, that's where you have a device that does things you can't really get on a smartphone or tablet and they need to keep IMO at least a 1 generation gap minimum between the Switch the other home consoles. If you let Sony/MS stretch it to 2 generations difference, the gap is too large and the Switch will lose credibility as a hybrid console and really just be a glorified portable that has a TV out. So when Sony/MS go to PS5/XB2, Nintendo needs to introduce a Switch that is in the PS4/XB1 tier at least. 

Otherwise the Switch brand is going to lose luster, it's not going to work as a "well now it's a cheap little Game Boy type thing!". 

I do agree that the whole generational arch in sales is an outdated concept. That it would be better for Nintendo to release new hardware on a regular schedule, like Apple. Though I don't consider the idea of "outdated visuals" to be the driving factor so much as consumers wanting new hardware instead of old hardware. The new hardware has to have some sort of meaningful upgrade, and the easiest thing to do is update the nVidia chipsets... a benefit that Nintendo would be foolish not to take advantage of. Apple has managed it more than sufficiently, and gaming isn't even the primary application of their iOS devices. You hit the right term when you said Nintendo needs to keep their product a compelling purchase. And were I in the market for a new video game console: a Switch 2 with the latest in nVidia technology to me sounds a lot more compelling than the Switch that came out in Winter 2017. Especially if I know the games will perform better on it, and it will be supported longer than the older Switch model.

They can also do the price shift thing, where they drop the price of the old one, and maybe raise the price of the new one by a small amount. This works A LOT better than selling a new model from scratch that costs 25% more than the last one.



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

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curl-6 said:
Soundwave said:

The Switch is selling because it's *not* the 3DS. It is not some low level game machine that relies a lot on kids. By going higher tier with the Switch you have a more compelling product that's resulting in better sales. 

If you do the whole "lets just ride this platform into the ground until it's badly outdated" thing that's not going to work for the Switch. Switch is a different kind of platform from the DS/3DS/GB lines, if Nintendo tried to make a "4DS" today it probably wouldn't even hit 50 million. Reason being smart phone games have really cannibalized the kids and budget market. The 3DS still has some sway there, but it's a small market. 

The higher end market is where it's at for Nintendo, that's where you have a device that does things you can't really get on a smartphone or tablet and they need to keep IMO at least a 1 generation gap minimum between the Switch the other home consoles. If you let Sony/MS stretch it to 2 generations difference, the gap is too large and the Switch will lose credibility as a hybrid console and really just be a glorified portable that has a TV out. So when Sony/MS go to PS5/XB2, Nintendo needs to introduce a Switch that is in the PS4/XB1 tier at least. 

Otherwise the Switch brand is going to lose luster, it's not going to work as a "well now it's a cheap little Game Boy type thing!". 

The Switch isn't high end though, it never was, from day 1 it was technically behind the competition. People aren't buying it for its graphics, two of its biggest sellers are Wii U games.

You're both right,

People aren't buying it for the graphics, but people ARE buying it because it's a compelling product.
And Nintendo is going to have to maintain that, otherwise they run into the generational arch where they sell up to year 2 or 3, and then in decline for 3, 4, 5, and 6, and then do it all over again from scratch.

Putting in a new graphical chip is an easy win, and then rather than declining from 15, to 12, to 10, to 6m, they can keep up the 20m per year level, and perhaps even increase it in 2020, 2021, 2022, 2023 and so on. We don't have to say goodbye the Switch and say hello to the Switch U, we can keep our Switches, new consumers get their Switch 2s which are more compelling purchases than ours, and third party devs get increased sales... as do first party devs.

This may be the first time this is possible with Nintendo hardware given the nature of the Switch... which is built with hardware that is generally made to be upgraded in this fashion.

I also think the next hardware would do best to launch the same day as Pokemon, with some other big first party game not far off that date: maybe Animal Crossing? (I would actually prefer Animal Crossing earlier, but business is business).



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

curl-6 said:
Soundwave said:

The Switch is selling because it's *not* the 3DS. It is not some low level game machine that relies a lot on kids. By going higher tier with the Switch you have a more compelling product that's resulting in better sales. 

If you do the whole "lets just ride this platform into the ground until it's badly outdated" thing that's not going to work for the Switch. Switch is a different kind of platform from the DS/3DS/GB lines, if Nintendo tried to make a "4DS" today it probably wouldn't even hit 50 million. Reason being smart phone games have really cannibalized the kids and budget market. The 3DS still has some sway there, but it's a small market. 

The higher end market is where it's at for Nintendo, that's where you have a device that does things you can't really get on a smartphone or tablet and they need to keep IMO at least a 1 generation gap minimum between the Switch the other home consoles. If you let Sony/MS stretch it to 2 generations difference, the gap is too large and the Switch will lose credibility as a hybrid console and really just be a glorified portable that has a TV out. So when Sony/MS go to PS5/XB2, Nintendo needs to introduce a Switch that is in the PS4/XB1 tier at least. 

Otherwise the Switch brand is going to lose luster, it's not going to work as a "well now it's a cheap little Game Boy type thing!". 

The Switch isn't high end though, it never was, from day 1 it was technically behind the competition. People aren't buying it for its graphics, two of its biggest sellers are Wii U games.

For a product that's portable, it's pretty high end. 

People are buying it because it's just high end enough to be feasible as a console. But if you let that run long in the tooth, that appeal fades and it just becomes a Game Boy type thing with a TV out. 

Keeping the discrepancy from modern home consoles to the Switch concept within 1 console generation is the key, that's close enough that you can have impressive experiences on the Switch that people don't associate with a portable machine that are relatively modern. PS4/XB1 are better hardware but Zelda: BoTW is still a game and overall experience that's relatively comparable to what you would see on a PS4/XB1.

When you lose the appeal of "wow, this little sucker can really play some modern style high end games" from the Switch concept, that concept as a whole loses a lot of steam. 

PS5/XB2 are going to become the home console standard soon, if you leave the current Switch to have to compare to that, it's too much of a gap, this is not the DS or GB where it's all about low-tech gaming and Nintendo has a monopoly on the kids portable gaming market anymore. That won't work. You want to keep the gap to one gen difference at least, so when they go to PS5/XB2, you should have a Switch ready that can play PS4/XB1 games maybe even slightly better than that. 

In other words, Switch should always have a hardware model capable of running a game like a Zelda or Metroid or whatever that is relatively in the same ball park of the other top end games of its day. When you allow a 2 generation gap, that's really not possible, the Zelda Nintendo can offer will look badly antiquated, like BotW would be if it had to run on 3DS tech instead of Wii U tech. 

Last edited by Soundwave - on 28 November 2018

What would you guys think if the next iterations are just called switch from now on. As in the name doesn't change but you understand that it's a newer or older model based on release year. Like how Dell has an XPS 13 every year but people understand the newer one from the older one



Just a guy who doesn't want to be bored. Also

Eagle367 said:
What would you guys think if the next iterations are just called switch from now on. As in the name doesn't change but you understand that it's a newer or older model based on release year. Like how Dell has an XPS 13 every year but people understand the newer one from the older one

I think that would work fine, especially in an iterative cycle. Just keep it "Switch", no big reset or big fuss every time there's a new model. It's "Switch" and "Switch" is the ecosystem of software first and foremost. Like "Steam". 

And you can buy whatever flavor of Switch hardware suits your needs. 



Soundwave said:
curl-6 said:

The Switch isn't high end though, it never was, from day 1 it was technically behind the competition. People aren't buying it for its graphics, two of its biggest sellers are Wii U games.

For a product that's portable, it's pretty high end. 

People are buying it because it's just high end enough to be feasible as a console. But if you let that run long in the tooth, that appeal fades and it just because a Game Boy type thing with a TV out. 

Keeping the discrepancy from modern home consoles to the Switch concept within 1 console generation is the key, that's close enough that you can have impressive experiences on the Switch that people don't associate with a portable machine that are relatively modern. PS4/XB1 are better hardware but Zelda: BoTW is still a game and overall experience that's relatively comparable to what you would see on a PS4/XB1.

When you lose the appeal of "wow, this little sucker can really play some modern style high end games" from the Switch concept, that concept as a whole loses a lot of steam. 

I guess we're just gonna have to disagree, the way I see it, from day 1 Switch was never getting the Battlefields, RDRs or Witchers of the PS4/Xbone space, it was selling as Nintendo products have for over two decades now on its first party killer apps. Heck, it's latest system seller, Pokemon Let's Go, looks like a 3DS game in HD yet its got people the world over running out to buy a Switch.

Nothing about the Switch strikes me as a system that's dependent on being technically up to date to sell.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.