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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - Question for those who are playing through Octopath after having played Bravely Default.

Today I completed the first character's chapter 4 after ~45 hours. The credits rolled, but there are obviously still seven other characters left, plus who knows if the game continues into one ultimate path once all eight storylines have been finished.

Anyway, Octopath Traveler doesn't do much to expand its combat system. I've said it in some thread last week that subclasses on the way to chapter 2 are the only addition. The subclass menu uses a ring to assign classes and there's still some empty space, so I assume that the game should have master classes, but I didn't get anything after finishing chapter 4 with one character, so who knows...

Another thing I mentioned is the level design which is the same across the board. Walking and fighting is the only thing you do. No changes through chapter 4.

What's evident is that Cyrus is the best character to choose as your main; the main character gets locked into your party until you've completed their fourth chapter, so the initial choice you make at the very start of the game matters quite a lot. I didn't pick Cyrus, but I strongly recommend to pick him. His unique talent is a free Analyse on all foes at the start of each battle, so enemies' weaknesses are much easier to figure out. His class also contains the skill that allows you to split the enemy encounter rate into half which is very handy anytime you go through low-level territory. The difficulty of the game adjusts depending on the number of recruited party members, but it tops out at threat level 11 in the beginning areas, so recruiting the second half of the eight characters is bound to see you fight weak enemies in droves.

Cyrus's combat abilities cover staff (very weak physical attack) and fire/ice/thunder elements that hit all enemies, even twice with unlocked skills. Makes him the best magic caster in the game when it comes to taking care of regular battles. It's no disadvantage to start with him because all beginning areas have foes that are weak to exactly what you have; but since Ophilia is another staff user with light and healing magic, I'd recommend to proceed clockwise at least for your second party member. Choosing Cyrus as your main gives you a versatile and useful character that you'll gladly keep in your party until the lock is lifted after completing his chapter 4.

Whereas Bravely Default was dreadful after 30 hours, I still want to play Octopath Traveler after 45 hours. A few of my characters have passed level 50, so they are technically overleveled (chapter 4 recommendation is 45), but the bosses have so much HP in this game that my party doesn't feel overleveled. I run a rather basic skill setup where I emphasize MP conservation and additional turns. It reminds me very much of the job system in Final Fantasy games where there are lots of useless skills and only a few of them really matter.

Routine sets in rather quickly in Octopath Traveler, but the EXP gains remain solid until you hit level 60 and the writing of the characters is interesting enough to be motivating. There are certainly better RPGs out there, but this isn't a stinker like Bravely Default. The most annoying things in Octopath Traveler are to figure out what enemies are weak against and the rather high random encounter rate, but both of those things can be mitigated by having Cyrus in your party. Right now I'd give Octopath Traveler a 7/10 which is a good score on my review scale. I can't see it getting higher because of the lack of variety in its gameplay; whether it will go lower will depend on how the game truly ends. I am not sure if a possible encore after all chapter 4s are cleared would be a good or a bad thing. This is already a very long game, after all.



Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

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RolStoppable said:
Today I completed the first character's chapter 4 after ~45 hours. The credits rolled, but there are obviously still seven other characters left, plus who knows if the game continues into one ultimate path once all eight storylines have been finished.

Anyway, Octopath Traveler doesn't do much to expand its combat system. I've said it in some thread last week that subclasses on the way to chapter 2 are the only addition. The subclass menu uses a ring to assign classes and there's still some empty space, so I assume that the game should have master classes, but I didn't get anything after finishing chapter 4 with one character, so who knows...

Another thing I mentioned is the level design which is the same across the board. Walking and fighting is the only thing you do. No changes through chapter 4.

What's evident is that Cyrus is the best character to choose as your main; the main character gets locked into your party until you've completed their fourth chapter, so the initial choice you make at the very start of the game matters quite a lot. I didn't pick Cyrus, but I strongly recommend to pick him. His unique talent is a free Analyse on all foes at the start of each battle, so enemies' weaknesses are much easier to figure out. His class also contains the skill that allows you to split the enemy encounter rate into half which is very handy anytime you go through low-level territory. The difficulty of the game adjusts depending on the number of recruited party members, but it tops out at threat level 11 in the beginning areas, so recruiting the second half of the eight characters is bound to see you fight weak enemies in droves.

Cyrus's combat abilities cover staff (very weak physical attack) and fire/ice/thunder elements that hit all enemies, even twice with unlocked skills. Makes him the best magic caster in the game when it comes to taking care of regular battles. It's no disadvantage to start with him because all beginning areas have foes that are weak to exactly what you have; but since Ophilia is another staff user with light and healing magic, I'd recommend to proceed clockwise at least for your second party member. Choosing Cyrus as your main gives you a versatile and useful character that you'll gladly keep in your party until the lock is lifted after completing his chapter 4.

Whereas Bravely Default was dreadful after 30 hours, I still want to play Octopath Traveler after 45 hours. A few of my characters have passed level 50, so they are technically overleveled (chapter 4 recommendation is 45), but the bosses have so much HP in this game that my party doesn't feel overleveled. I run a rather basic skill setup where I emphasize MP conservation and additional turns. It reminds me very much of the job system in Final Fantasy games where there are lots of useless skills and only a few of them really matter.

Routine sets in rather quickly in Octopath Traveler, but the EXP gains remain solid until you hit level 60 and the writing of the characters is interesting enough to be motivating. There are certainly better RPGs out there, but this isn't a stinker like Bravely Default. The most annoying things in Octopath Traveler are to figure out what enemies are weak against and the rather high random encounter rate, but both of those things can be mitigated by having Cyrus in your party. Right now I'd give Octopath Traveler a 7/10 which is a good score on my review scale. I can't see it getting higher because of the lack of variety in its gameplay; whether it will go lower will depend on how the game truly ends. I am not sure if a possible encore after all chapter 4s are cleared would be a good or a bad thing. This is already a very long game, after all.

Yeah, there are four advanced job shrines basically in the 4 corners of the map.  Sorcerer, warmaster, runelord and starsomething. I gave Cyrus the sorcerer job and he is basically unstoppable now.  You have to be at least level 50, but probably more like level 60 to even attempt to get those jobs.  I finally got my first advanced job at level 65 or so.  I recommend starting with sorcerer which is in the upper left corner of the map.  Warmaster is good too, but runelord is pretty worthless...



I would suggest you play the best games that the JRPG genre has to offer before you play Octopath. Chrono Trigger, Final Fantasy 6, Final Fantasy 7, and Dragon Quest 8 blow the Bravely/Octo games out of the water. Chrono Trigger is the best of them, due to not wasting the player's time like most JRPGs do.



The sentence below is false. 
The sentence above is true. 

 

Octopath is its own beast, aside from similar but not quite the same combat.

The game goes for a much more serious and retro feel, where as Bravely was retrospect but with steps to innovation including the misaligned cycle system at the back half. Honestly despite people keep bringing up FF6, I would say that the game is closer to a DQ style story of short arcs but with no connecting big story arc to bridge it all. It is a good game but I do think one review put it best this is a side game and it will wear on you if you are going full bore at it because of everything being similar.



NoirSon said:
Octopath is its own beast, aside from similar but not quite the same combat.

The game goes for a much more serious and retro feel, where as Bravely was retrospect but with steps to innovation including the misaligned cycle system at the back half. Honestly despite people keep bringing up FF6, I would say that the game is closer to a DQ style story of short arcs but with no connecting big story arc to bridge it all. It is a good game but I do think one review put it best this is a side game and it will wear on you if you are going full bore at it because of everything being similar.

But that's not much the case where you can clearly see people going full throttle on this game with extended playthrough time.

It is however playable in the fashion you see fit. 



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Mar1217 said:
LMU Uncle Alfred said:
I have my eye on the game, but a flaw that can turn into a really big problem and seems to be just kind of swept under the rug by reviewers or gamers is the grinding. Also, I don't know anything about the encounter rate but it looked kind of high relatively speaking from what I have seen in some gameplay. Can we control the encounter rate like in BD? Because that should be considered a make or break for many gamers not willing to go through a potential slog fest of a jrpg like the olden days. Does anybody know if there is at least an item or something that turns off the encounter rate? I am overall ok with random battles if the rate and necessity to grind is done half way decently. I have slogged through many old school jrpgs, but the ones with high encounter rates have always been a huge pain for the vast majority of JRPGs save for maybe a few FF games that did it right in terms of the rate and exp/gil reward rate per battle.

I have no desire to go back to that flawed game design to be honest; even if the story is great.

1) If you just go exploring every dungeons (not just the main ones, there's also extra ones to explore) then you shouldn't be in a position to go grind. Actually your protagonist will probably be overleveled if you try to do everything before going into the 2nd Chapters section of the game. Though you must be willing to deviate from the path , if you go into a linear fashion, then yeah, you'll probably grind for no more than an hour.

2) There's no direct mean to do that, but you can unlock a character skill that permits to heavily decrease the encounter rate. I won't tell you which one :P

 

That's what excessive grinding is though on your first point. Optional dungeons should remain optional. It's a huge game breaker now that we have reached 2018.  This kind of archaic game design should have died out in the NES era.  I just wish Japanese rpg game developers realized by now of all times that maybe people don't want to spend every waking hour playing the game walking 5 steps encounter, walking 5 steps encounter etc.  Yeah there might be a way to reduce the encounter rate, but if it's necessary to grind to get past certain areas then why bother reducing the encounter rate? 



Lube Me Up

LMU Uncle Alfred said:
Mar1217 said:

1) If you just go exploring every dungeons (not just the main ones, there's also extra ones to explore) then you shouldn't be in a position to go grind. Actually your protagonist will probably be overleveled if you try to do everything before going into the 2nd Chapters section of the game. Though you must be willing to deviate from the path , if you go into a linear fashion, then yeah, you'll probably grind for no more than an hour.

2) There's no direct mean to do that, but you can unlock a character skill that permits to heavily decrease the encounter rate. I won't tell you which one :P

 

That's what excessive grinding is though on your first point. Optional dungeons should remain optional. It's a huge game breaker now that we have reached 2018.  This kind of archaic game design should have died out in the NES era.  I just wish Japanese rpg game developers realized by now of all times that maybe people don't want to spend every waking hour playing the game walking 5 steps encounter, walking 5 steps encounter etc.  Yeah there might be a way to reduce the encounter rate, but if it's necessary to grind to get past certain areas then why bother reducing the encounter rate? 

And maybe if you didn't feel so entitled to your opinion you could maybe understand that lots of people do enjoy the grind. And even then, since there's dungeons to explore it shouldn't feel as if you were in the process. 

And even so, you could just go into the next Chapter's area if you want to do so, nothing's stopping you.

To be honest, it only feels as if you were here to rant about you find old style turn based JRPG mechanics to be archaic because you enjoy much more mindless action-esque game that doesn't demand much of your attention.

" if it's necessary to grind to get past certain areas then why bother reducing the encounter rate? "

Cuz you can get overleveled easily if  you wish to which means that you can lower the encounter rate if you prefer to explore certains areas without fighting too much underleveled enemies or dangerous beasts.



Switch Friend Code : 3905-6122-2909 

Mar1217 said:
LMU Uncle Alfred said:

 

That's what excessive grinding is though on your first point. Optional dungeons should remain optional. It's a huge game breaker now that we have reached 2018.  This kind of archaic game design should have died out in the NES era.  I just wish Japanese rpg game developers realized by now of all times that maybe people don't want to spend every waking hour playing the game walking 5 steps encounter, walking 5 steps encounter etc.  Yeah there might be a way to reduce the encounter rate, but if it's necessary to grind to get past certain areas then why bother reducing the encounter rate? 

And maybe if you didn't feel so entitled to your opinion you could maybe understand that lots of people do enjoy the grind. And even then, since there's dungeons to explore it shouldn't feel as if you were in the process. 

And even so, you could just go into the next Chapter's area if you want to do so, nothing's stopping you.

To be honest, it only feels as if you were here to rant about you find old style turn based JRPG mechanics to be archaic because you enjoy much more mindless action-esque game that doesn't demand much of your attention.

" if it's necessary to grind to get past certain areas then why bother reducing the encounter rate? "

Cuz you can get overleveled easily if  you wish to which means that you can lower the encounter rate if you prefer to explore certains areas without fighting too much underleveled enemies or dangerous beasts.

How do the chapters in OT work?  If you're doing someone else's path, you can just go to another's path and that previous character will level up?  How about the rest of the characters?

 Excessive grinding can be a tiring process and be a roadblock for more gamers than not.  Or at the very least it can wear some down to the point they just stop playing the game after realizing how much more grinding they'd have to do. 



Lube Me Up

LMU Uncle Alfred said:
Mar1217 said:

And maybe if you didn't feel so entitled to your opinion you could maybe understand that lots of people do enjoy the grind. And even then, since there's dungeons to explore it shouldn't feel as if you were in the process. 

And even so, you could just go into the next Chapter's area if you want to do so, nothing's stopping you.

To be honest, it only feels as if you were here to rant about you find old style turn based JRPG mechanics to be archaic because you enjoy much more mindless action-esque game that doesn't demand much of your attention.

" if it's necessary to grind to get past certain areas then why bother reducing the encounter rate? "

Cuz you can get overleveled easily if  you wish to which means that you can lower the encounter rate if you prefer to explore certains areas without fighting too much underleveled enemies or dangerous beasts.

How do the chapters in OT work?  If you're doing someone else's path, you can just go to another's path and that previous character will level up?  How about the rest of the characters?

 Excessive grinding can be a tiring process and be a roadblock for more gamers than not.  Or at the very least it can wear some down to the point they just stop playing the game after realizing how much more grinding they'd have to do. 

If you start a chapter for one character there is a mechanic that lets you stop leave that area and start or resume another character's chapter. Leveling up is just through battles so if you are not using a character in battle they stay at whatever level you acquired them.  



LMU Uncle Alfred said:
Mar1217 said:

And maybe if you didn't feel so entitled to your opinion you could maybe understand that lots of people do enjoy the grind. And even then, since there's dungeons to explore it shouldn't feel as if you were in the process. 

And even so, you could just go into the next Chapter's area if you want to do so, nothing's stopping you.

To be honest, it only feels as if you were here to rant about you find old style turn based JRPG mechanics to be archaic because you enjoy much more mindless action-esque game that doesn't demand much of your attention.

" if it's necessary to grind to get past certain areas then why bother reducing the encounter rate? "

Cuz you can get overleveled easily if  you wish to which means that you can lower the encounter rate if you prefer to explore certains areas without fighting too much underleveled enemies or dangerous beasts.

How do the chapters in OT work?  If you're doing someone else's path, you can just go to another's path and that previous character will level up?  How about the rest of the characters?

 Excessive grinding can be a tiring process and be a roadblock for more gamers than not.  Or at the very least it can wear some down to the point they just stop playing the game after realizing how much more grinding they'd have to do. 

JRPGs didn't become super popular until Final Fantasy 7.  However there was a very passionate group of niche gamers that really loved the NES/SNES/Genesis era of RPG.  Games like Bravely Default and Octopath Traveler are really for that passionate niche, or for younger people who would have been in that niche if they were given the chance.  These games are definitely not for everyone, but many of the people who play them like the grind as long as the combat system is good and the monsters are well designed and so on.  I remember the first time I played Final Fantasy Tactics I would grind all the time and I just really had a blast.