By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Close

Forums - Gaming Discussion - The DualSense has changed my mind...

IcaroRibeiro said:

Am I the only one who see almost no difference in any of those controllers unless it's something so different that is impossible to ignore (like Wii U) ?

As a dude with big hands, the controllers make very little difference to me. Smartphones on the other hand, impossible. I don't understand how people don't get instant tendonitis after using the smartphone for an hour.



Around the Network
jenpol said:

The DualSense is my best controller. I preferred the asymmetric joysticks before it, but now the symmetric configuration doesn’t bother me.
Maybe it' because the weight and the size feels right.

My exact thoughts.



Insert Coin. Press START. You Died. Continue?

Conina said:
SuperRetroTurbo said:

I picked up a DualSense. Not because I own a PS5 because I don't (yet) but because of my passion for controllers and right out of the box, at first glance, I can honestly say THIS IS thee best controller on the market today.

Every controller has it's flaws as does the DualSense but those flaws are anecdotal. It's very hard to argue otherwise. 

So how do you use the DualSense if you don't have a PS5?

Have you connected it to a PC? Or haven't you connected it at all and your only experience with it so far are the ergonomics?

Sorry for the late response, I've been doing a lot lately but yeah, I'm going to play a few roms with it on my S4 tab.

I'm just thoroughly impressed with the design. My only gripe are the triggers. Not a fan of the rubbery response but like I said before, that can easily be overlooked for practically everything else about it.



Insert Coin. Press START. You Died. Continue?

Out of curiosity, what is it about the DualSense that makes you like it the most?
You said you picked it up, but don't have a PS5. So if you use it for another system like PC, it won't make use of it's unique features like adaptive triggers and haptic feedback?



Does it have a gyroscope?



Around the Network
SuperRetroTurbo said:

My only gripe are the triggers. Not a fan of the rubbery response...

Hiku said:

So if you use it for another system like PC, it won't make use of it's unique features like adaptive triggers and haptic feedback?

Exactly, that is the thing about using it as generic controller, unique features won't be activated and that applies to physical feel in case of active triggers. Although perhaps it should be possible for software to let you "tune" the specific force levels on the triggers on games that don't actively utilize them? In any case, it would be more ideal to use with actual PS5 software, or whenever some PC games might start supporting those features better.

For me, I always felt the symmetric layout was ergonomically superior, although I think the reason why some don't think so is it doesn't seem as simple/clear an arrangement conceptually... But it isn't actually a strain to have slightly assymetrical grip with different wrist angles. And the human thumb just naturally wants to move in diagonal relative to palm (away/index-finger vs close/pinky-finger) so having the controls closest to you be more elevated from surface of contoller is most natural and needs the least ongoing stress, while having to simulateously raise your thumb from the surface (buttons) while pushing it forward (stick) requires more ongoing stress. Technically, one could solve that with "stick" buried in controller/flush with surface (ala PSP/Vita), while lower button cluster are heavily raised from surface, but relative to any other controller I know the Sony approach is actually better ergonomically...

I think the issue is that 99% of people don't actually get specific in ergonomics like that and just go off of mental map and expectations / comfort zone of what they are used to. In any case, I think everything else about controller angles and nuances has really been improved to be top notch experience as a whole.



KLAMarine said:

Does it have a gyroscope?

Yes.



SuperRetroTurbo said:
Conina said:

So how do you use the DualSense if you don't have a PS5?

Have you connected it to a PC? Or haven't you connected it at all and your only experience with it so far are the ergonomics?

Sorry for the late response, I've been doing a lot lately but yeah, I'm going to play a few roms with it on my S4 tab.

I'm just thoroughly impressed with the design. My only gripe are the triggers. Not a fan of the rubbery response but like I said before, that can easily be overlooked for practically everything else about it.

I'm glad that you love the ergonomics of the DualSense and that it fits perfectly for your hands... but hand sizes and handforms and prefered button layouts are different for other people.

So general expressions such as "I can honestly say THIS IS thee best controller on the market today" and "Every controller has it's flaws as does the DualSense but those flaws are anecdotal. It's very hard to argue otherwise." aren't very helpful.

It's super easy to argue otherwise, barely an inconvenience:

  • ergonomics depend on the hand sizes and handforms of each user
  • controllers are more than ergonomics... there can be other flaws
  • will the drifting problem stay anecdotal or will it grow bigger? Will Sony fix that problem in the next batch of DualSense controllers?
  • the battery time is still not great: https://www.google.com/search?client=firefox-b-d&q=battery+time+dualsense



mutantsushi said:

For me, I always felt the symmetric layout was ergonomically superior, although I think the reason why some don't think so is it doesn't seem as simple/clear an arrangement conceptually... But it isn't actually a strain to have slightly assymetrical grip with different wrist angles. And the human thumb just naturally wants to move in diagonal relative to palm (away/index-finger vs close/pinky-finger) so having the controls closest to you be more elevated from surface of contoller is most natural and needs the least ongoing stress, while having to simulateously raise your thumb from the surface (buttons) while pushing it forward (stick) requires more ongoing stress.

It is (slightly) more comfortable to have an symmetrical grip than an asymmetrical grip... but that doesn't automatically mean that a symmetric layout is ergonomically superior to an asymmetric layout.

It is heavily dependant on the games:

  • for some of them the left stick is more in use than the directional buttons, for other games the directional buttons are more in use
  • for some of them the right stick is more in use than the face buttons (since most important actions are mapped on the trigger buttons), for other games the  face buttons are more in use

There has been an evolution in games, since analogue sticks were introduced:

  • for most 5th gen games the directional buttons were still dominant over the left analogue stick (middle analogue stick of the N64 controller)... of course depending of the genre
  • for most 5th gen games the face buttons were still dominant over the right analogue stick / C-stick (camera controls were rare) and dominant over the trigger buttons (main actions were mapped to face buttons, supporting actions were mapped to the trigger buttons)... of course depending of the genre and if it was a 2D or a 3D game
  • for most 6th gen games the left analogue stick got dominant over the directional buttons... of course depending of the genre
  • for most 6th gen games the face buttons were still dominant over the right analogue stick / C-stick (but camera controls became more common) and dominant over the trigger buttons (main actions were mapped to face buttons, supporting actions were mapped to the trigger buttons)... of course depending of the genre and if it was a 2D or a 3D game
  • for most 7th/8th gen games the left analogue stick was dominant over the directional buttons... of course depending of the genre (the Wii was an exception, since the Nunchuk controller was an accessory)
  • for most 7th/8th gen games the right analogue stick got dominant over the face buttons (controlling the camera got essential in most 3D games), the trigger buttons got dominant over the face buttons (main actions were mapped to trigger buttons, supporting actions were mapped to the face buttons, due to the importance of camera control)
  • many popular 7th and 8th gen indie games focus on classic gameplay and 2d-scrolling, so directional buttons and/or face buttons are dominant for them 

So there is no "superior" layout that works best for all games... in a perfect world the position of sticks and buttons could be swapped for each game.

How comfortable sticks or buttons are to reach also depends if the palms can give support with ergonomic grips... handhelds and Switch joy-cons are lacking those, but that can be fixed with accessory grips in some cases.



SuperRetroTurbo said:

...at least for now. 

First I want to say, the significance of controllers as a peripheral is severely underappreciated and often overlooked as a deciding factor when choosing a system.

Most in part due to the evolution of graphics but also the nature of bias gaming.

It's a thing. 

It wasn't until Sega released their SixButton that the topic was up for debate and even then, gamers (console) never really spoke much about it. You just played with what was accessible or if you were a cool kid, you had to play with turbo buttons but I digress.

Nintendo undoubtedly set the blueprint for controllers but imo, Microsoft is the reason why ergonomics are now considered just as important as layout and ability. 

Since the OG Box dropped the S controller, I've been nothing but impressed with their approach. The bar had been set and Playstations refusal to adapt coupled with Nintendos wonky way of doing things, it seemed as though MS had this one in the bag and they most certainly did....until now.

I picked up a DualSense. Not because I own a PS5 because I don't (yet) but because of my passion for controllers and right out of the box, at first glance, I can honestly say THIS IS thee best controller on the market today.

Every controller has it's flaws as does the DualSense but those flaws are anecdotal. It's very hard to argue otherwise. 

So what's my point? 

Point is, it dawned on me back in the 64 days, that if I could play Goldeneye with a S controller, I would. If I could play Uncharted with a 360 controller I would.

So was it really the system I had bias for or was it simply the controller? I'm not a graphics guy. Never was and never will be so if that's your thing then maybe this topic isn't for you but after all these years of loyalty, I may soon be siding with Sony because they finally get it. 

They finally understand the true significance and importance of how a controller can make or break one's experience gaming because the DualSense is absolutely fccking amazing.

I completely agree. All this is very important for a comfortable game.