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Forums - Sales Discussion - Why Sonys Play Station is the standard for home consoles since 1994 ?

Soundwave said:

For all the talk about "Sony" brand meaning so much in the 90s, there sure wasn't much evidence of that early on.

The Saturn was outselling the Playstation quite easily in Japan for example.

The N64 was destroying the Playstation's sales pace in North America and also had a way stronger launch in Japan.

Money-hatting IPs like Final Fantasy and Tomb Raider is when the Playstation started to accelerate in sales, not their brand.

They would have gotten beat by the N64 plain and simple if Nintendo had compromised with their close partners like Squaresoft and Capcom and used CD-ROM. You could still have had cartridge based games too if that's what Miyamoto wanted. They would not have been able to compete against Nintendo's 1st party IP of the day like Mario 64, GoldenEye, Zelda: OoT, Mario Kart 64, etc. on top of things like Nintendo having exclusive Star Wars games and 3rd party titles like Final Fantasy VII, Resident Evil 2/3 (day and date), Dino Crisis, Chrono Cross, etc. 

Can you educate me on how FF7 was money-hatted ?



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Nah. Sony have no merit. The only reason they had success is because their competitors didn’t.




Hynad said:

Nah. Sony have no merit. The only reason they had success is because their competitors didn’t.

Nuff said /thread.

Don't forget they bankrupted Sega, killed miyamoto's pet and burned MS headquarters.



duduspace11 "Well, since we are estimating costs, Pokemon Red/Blue did cost Nintendo about $50m to make back in 1996"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=8808363

Mr Puggsly: "Hehe, I said good profit. You said big profit. Frankly, not losing money is what I meant by good. Don't get hung up on semantics"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=9008994

Azzanation: "PS5 wouldn't sold out at launch without scalpers."

Wyrdness said:

PS being the standard is incorrect they simply made gaming mainstream but other companies are the ones who have done the standard features in home consoles today:

NEC: First Internal Memory 
Nintendo: First modern console and controller, Practical Motion Control, Shoulder Buttons, Modern Analogue Stick, Wireless Controller, Rumble, Retro Service (VC)
SEGA: Online, CD Format, Memory Cards, Online Connectivity out the box, Analogue Triggers
MS: Integrated HDD, Modern Online Ecosystem, Universal Integrated Chat, Introduced Digital Distribution

There's a lot in here that's factually wrong but since it's anti-sony, I'm not going to complain too much.



Twitter: @d21lewis

Soundwave said:
OTBWY said:

I think people underestimate the huge power Sony had as a company back then. They were "the" electronics company. Always setting out for market standards when it came to formats and other media. Some failed hard like Betamax, but then you have Trinitron or the Walkman. And with that power, they put a huge marketing budget behind it. First: moneyhatting Japanese developers (and in the west to some extent), using old fashioned Tokyo relations (as opposed to Nintendo's Kyoto relations) and driving that with massive marketing worth billions today and utilizing their extensive global distribution network. They were definitely not some kind of underdog. They were more like IBM coming into the personal computer market. 

I was there, I remember what it was. In fact I remember reading about the Playstation in 1991 when it was the SNES CD-drive. 

They basically aped the Super Nintendo and stole the 3rd party developers and locked them out from making Sega games. Once they got a few key ones on board the others followed suit. 

That was basically it. 

But early on? The Playstation was getting its ass kicked rather handily in several key markets. The N64 had way more hype and was selling way faster than the Playstation in the US and Japan. In Japan the Saturn was also outselling the Playstation. 

People were not that impressed with the brand "Sony", yeah they were a popular electronics brand but one of many, they were not anything like say Apple where the brand has a fanatical following. If you had a Panasonic stereo instead of a Sony one, no one cared and Beta was seen as a huge failure/laughing stock. 

The "Walkman" was old news by the mid-90s, dozens of different electronic companies had portable cassette players, it wasn't a big deal to specifically have the Sony branded one. 

The cassette Walkman was old news but the CD version was still colloquially referred to as the 'CD Walkman' even if it was made by Phillips/Panasonic.  Things might have been different in the US and Europe but here Sony making a console gave the 70s kids/young adults permission to play games again and that was helped by the type of software PS1 offered. Parents also trusted Sony and saw the value in a device that could play music and games as opposed to a standalone games machine. I've known parents ban kids from videogames but never music.



Nov 2016 - NES outsells PS1 (JP)

Don't Play Stationary 4 ever. Switch!

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Immersiveunreality said:

Can you educate me on how FF7 was money-hatted ?

Sony gave Squaresoft a vastly reduced licensing fee and agreed to handle the marketing campaign as well as give Square some of the funding in exchange Sony also obtained a small share percentage in the company which they later increased to 18% when the FF movie and animes flopped as those caused Square to ask for money, this was one factor behind the merger with Enix as it reduced Sony's stake in them giving the latter less influence in decisions. Sony would later sell their shares as they no longer would have any say after the merger as it reduced their stake to about 8% (a link on them selling the shares below)

https://venturebeat.com/2014/04/16/sony-is-selling-off-all-its-shares-in-final-fantasy-publisher-square-enix/



d21lewis said:

There's a lot in here that's factually wrong but since it's anti-sony, I'm not going to complain too much.

Such as?



Because they were around in the right place at the right time, and avoided making the same mistakes Nintendo and Sega did.

Nintendo was convinced that cartridges still had a future when it came to home consoles. They were wrong. Third parties by and large preferred discs because they were far cheaper but had far more data capacity (giving them a roughly 100-to-1 advantage in terms of cost per megabyte). So the big third parties of the time, namely Capcom, Konami, Square, and Enix, ultimately decided they weren't going to be bothering with the N64 all that much (some of them not at all). Nintendo's behavior towards their decision to switch platforms didn't do them any favors, either (Sony meanwhile was apparently quite amicable towards third parties). The N64 did get a fair amount of support from Western publishers, who were finally starting to reassert themselves after being overshadowed by their Japanese counterparts in the previous two generations, but it wasn't enough. The loss of Final Fantasy to PlayStation was by itself enough to seal the N64's fate. FF7 was the most hyped and, ultimately, most successful third-party title of that generation. The PS1 struggled early on, and though it did improve over time, it was FF7 that propelled the PS1 to new heights. Especially in the U.S., where the N64 was the overall market leader from Sept. 1996 to Aug. 1997, but after FF7 was released in Sept. 1997 the PS1 pulled way ahead of the N64 and nearly doubled its lifetime sales over just the next four months.

Sega meanwhile dropped the ball... which rolled away and down a storm drain. They absolutely bungled the Saturn's launch in North America, which had been Sega's best market with the Genesis. They made a surprise announcement at E3 1995 that it was coming out that day instead of the later date that had already been announced, but it was only available at a few select retailers. It was overpriced by the standards of the time at $400 (which led to a Sony rep taking the stage at that same E3, saying "Two Ninety-nine," and walking off). It had no mainline Sonic game despite it being Sega's biggest IP by far at the time. It was just a massive debacle all around. It fared better in Japan, and actually performed better than the Mega Drive did there, but it never got close to the level of sales the NES and SNES did at their peak, and when the PS1 finally started taking off the Saturn was quickly overlooked.



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In accordance to the VGC forum rules, §8.5, I hereby exercise my right to demand to be left alone regarding the subject of the effects of the pandemic on video game sales (i.e., "COVID bump").

Wyrdness said:
d21lewis said:

There's a lot in here that's factually wrong but since it's anti-sony, I'm not going to complain too much.

Such as?

-Johnny Turbo (TurboGrafx-16 mascot for a short while, worth a Google if you want a laugh) said that the Turbo CD was out two years before the Sega CD.

-Neo Geo had memory cards before Sega

-There were wireless controllers (that sucked) way before the Wavebird. I remember many for the NES.

-Not sure about retro video game service but there were plenty of old games on the XBL service prior to the Virtual Console. I guess you could say Nintendo did it more thoroughly.

-There's a lot of "unnofficial" attempts at online gaming. Some were just digital downloads. Some actually allowed head to head play like Xband and Sharkwire. According to a quick Google search, the Apple Pippin was the first out of the box with built in online.

-Guru Larry (Larry Bundy Jr.) had a video that blew my mind about things I thought Nintendo did first, including the NES controller.

https://youtu.be/56AoH-ZPk9s

(I keep having to flip back to the last page to see the post)

Last edited by d21lewis - on 08 June 2020

Twitter: @d21lewis

d21lewis said:
Wyrdness said:

Such as?

-Johnny Turbo (TurboGrafx-16 mascot for a short while, worth a Google if you want a laugh) said that the Turbo CD was out two years before the Sega CD.

-Neo Geo had memory cards before Sega

-There were wireless controllers (that sucked) way before the Wavebird. I remember many for the NES.

-Not sure about retro video game service but there were plenty of old games on the XBL service prior to the Virtual Console. I guess you could say Nintendo did it more thoroughly.

-There's a lot of "unnofficial" attempts at online gaming. Some were just digital downloads. Some actually allowed head to head play like Xband and Sharkwire. According to a quick Google search, the Apple Pippin was the first out of the box with built in online.

-Guru Larry (Larry Bundy Jr.) had a video that blew my mind about things I thought Nintendo did first, including the NES controller.

(I keep having to flip back to the last page to see the post)

It never get old "Nintendo invent and Sony rip-off". Then you show it was done 10 or more years before Nintendo and radio silence.



duduspace11 "Well, since we are estimating costs, Pokemon Red/Blue did cost Nintendo about $50m to make back in 1996"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=8808363

Mr Puggsly: "Hehe, I said good profit. You said big profit. Frankly, not losing money is what I meant by good. Don't get hung up on semantics"

http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=9008994

Azzanation: "PS5 wouldn't sold out at launch without scalpers."