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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - What's the single best game Nintendo has ever created?

Mario Galaxy, for the sheer enjoyment of contemplating emptiness while listening to its serene compositions. Taking you back to when you were a kid, back when everything could spark joy and elation, that takes something bafflingly bewildering: true magic.



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The_Liquid_Laser said:

The Legend of Zelda (NES)

3. Most Innovative Game - Zelda 1 is arguably the most innovative game ever made.  You have to realize, first of all, that Super Mario 1 was considered an extremely innovative game in it's day.  Think about that.  Just the fact that the screen scrolled in 1 direction and there was music playing and a second button for running and fire -- all of that was extremely new at the time.  However The Legend of Zelda and Super Mario Bros were developed at the exact same time.  Zelda had 4 way directional exploration.  It had dual purpose items that could be used for both combat and to find secrets.  Hell, it had far more secrets than any game that came before.  It was the perfect marriage between arcade action and PC depth.  It was the first console game to actually use a save state.  It was also the first major console game to use anything like hit points.  It was so freakin' innovative, that they included a hint guide with the game.  This is also why you don't start with a sword in Zelda 1.  Miyamoto wanted people to realize that this game was not like anything that had come before.

You're giving Zelda undue credit.

There were many adventure games and RPGs with 4 directional exploration before Zelda. The first such console game was "Adventure" from 1979 for the Atari 2600 which established the action-adventure genre and its primary conventions, including the 4 directional exploration across a large map that you incorrectly credit Zelda as inventing. Zelda also wasn't the first adventure game to have you start without a sword, this was actually common practice in Atari 2600 action adventure games. But Adventure (1979) was, perhaps, the first game that included hidden secrets.

There were also adventure games on Atari that had users switch between overhead and sidescrolling levels.

You can play Adventure and other earlier action adventures on Switch in the Atari Flashbacks collection.



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

It might be some recency bias on my part, but I'll say BotW.

Melee is a close second, tho. I poured hundreds of hours into that game as a kid.



Jumpin said:
The_Liquid_Laser said:

The Legend of Zelda (NES)

3. Most Innovative Game - Zelda 1 is arguably the most innovative game ever made.  You have to realize, first of all, that Super Mario 1 was considered an extremely innovative game in it's day.  Think about that.  Just the fact that the screen scrolled in 1 direction and there was music playing and a second button for running and fire -- all of that was extremely new at the time.  However The Legend of Zelda and Super Mario Bros were developed at the exact same time.  Zelda had 4 way directional exploration.  It had dual purpose items that could be used for both combat and to find secrets.  Hell, it had far more secrets than any game that came before.  It was the perfect marriage between arcade action and PC depth.  It was the first console game to actually use a save state.  It was also the first major console game to use anything like hit points.  It was so freakin' innovative, that they included a hint guide with the game.  This is also why you don't start with a sword in Zelda 1.  Miyamoto wanted people to realize that this game was not like anything that had come before.

You're giving Zelda undue credit.

There were many adventure games and RPGs with 4 directional exploration before Zelda. The first such console game was "Adventure" from 1979 for the Atari 2600 which established the action-adventure genre and its primary conventions, including the 4 directional exploration across a large map that you incorrectly credit Zelda as inventing. Zelda also wasn't the first adventure game to have you start without a sword, this was actually common practice in Atari 2600 action adventure games. But Adventure (1979) was, perhaps, the first game that included hidden secrets.

There were also adventure games on Atari that had users switch between overhead and sidescrolling levels.

You can play Adventure and other earlier action adventures on Switch in the Atari Flashbacks collection.

I am very well acquainted with Adventure.  It was one of my top 50 games of all time on last year's list. 

Let me clarify the paragraph you quoted by saying that Super Mario Bros was considered an innovative game at it's time, but Zelda was actually a much more complex game that was developed at the same time.  I didn't mean to imply that Zelda invented 4-way directional exploration, and it didn't invent the idea of not starting with a sword.  Instead, it was a much more complex game than Super Mario Bros, and to make the game work they had to innovate a whole lot more.

Also Zelda 1 is a much bigger and more complex game than Adventure.  It is somewhat like comparing Contra to Call of Duty.  Yeah they are both wartime shooter games, but it takes a lot of innovation to go from Contra to Call of Duty.



The_Liquid_Laser said:

Thanks for the kind reply.

Zelda 1 did in fact come with a map of most of the world (except the upper corner areas) that also had some hints on the other side about the first couple of dungeons.  The instruction manual also had several pages of art and story about the game.  This is the sort of thing that helped make the first Zelda feel like a living, breathing world.  It also is a lot like what some PC RPGs would do in the day.  In the 80's some RPGs would include maps or other inserts to make you feel like you were entering a fantasy world.  Zelda 1 did the same thing. 

I found this PDF that has the original instructions and map.
https://www.nintendo.co.jp/clv/manuals/en/pdf/CLV-P-NAANE.pdf

Wow, man, something I haven't looked at since I was a little kid. This was a real treat! I just finished Link's Awakening on Switch, and now I need a new game to play. Going to load this up on my NES Classic tonight and see where things go.



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The_Liquid_Laser said:
Jumpin said:

You're giving Zelda undue credit.

There were many adventure games and RPGs with 4 directional exploration before Zelda. The first such console game was "Adventure" from 1979 for the Atari 2600 which established the action-adventure genre and its primary conventions, including the 4 directional exploration across a large map that you incorrectly credit Zelda as inventing. Zelda also wasn't the first adventure game to have you start without a sword, this was actually common practice in Atari 2600 action adventure games. But Adventure (1979) was, perhaps, the first game that included hidden secrets.

There were also adventure games on Atari that had users switch between overhead and sidescrolling levels.

You can play Adventure and other earlier action adventures on Switch in the Atari Flashbacks collection.

I am very well acquainted with Adventure.  It was one of my top 50 games of all time on last year's list. 

Let me clarify the paragraph you quoted by saying that Super Mario Bros was considered an innovative game at it's time, but Zelda was actually a much more complex game that was developed at the same time.  I didn't mean to imply that Zelda invented 4-way directional exploration, and it didn't invent the idea of not starting with a sword.  Instead, it was a much more complex game than Super Mario Bros, and to make the game work they had to innovate a whole lot more.

Also Zelda 1 is a much bigger and more complex game than Adventure.  It is somewhat like comparing Contra to Call of Duty.  Yeah they are both wartime shooter games, but it takes a lot of innovation to go from Contra to Call of Duty.

Haha true, I do not disagree with you there.

Thanks for the clarification in your response!



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

GuyDuke said:
Mario Galaxy, for the sheer enjoyment of contemplating emptiness while listening to its serene compositions. Taking you back to when you were a kid, back when everything could spark joy and elation, that takes something bafflingly bewildering: true magic.

Good pick, part of the reason why it was my favourite game for about a decade. Mario Galaxy is a truly magical experience. I see it, in a way, as the fulfillment of what Nintendo was attempting to achieve with Super Mario 64.



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

One Game? Too Hard

Wii Sports, Breath of the Wild, Super Mario Bros. 3, Zelda 1, Super Metroid, Metroid Prime, Super Smash Bros. and Mario Kart DS. 



GuyDuke said:
Mario Galaxy, for the sheer enjoyment of contemplating emptiness while listening to its serene compositions. Taking you back to when you were a kid, back when everything could spark joy and elation, that takes something bafflingly bewildering: true magic.

Brilliantly said. This was actually the main reason I think Galaxy 1 is better than 2, it's celestial backdrops and the slightly more poignant vibe of the music gave it more emotive depth than the blue skies and lighter tunes of 2.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

curl-6 said:
GuyDuke said:
Mario Galaxy, for the sheer enjoyment of contemplating emptiness while listening to its serene compositions. Taking you back to when you were a kid, back when everything could spark joy and elation, that takes something bafflingly bewildering: true magic.

Brilliantly said. This was actually the main reason I think Galaxy 1 is better than 2, it's celestial backdrops and the slightly more poignant vibe of the music gave it more emotive depth than the blue skies and lighter tunes of 2.

That's it! That's exactly it! I was trying to figure out why Galaxy 2 felt unfulfilling and uncharismatic, now I believe you've put the finger on it - it couldn't let you enjoy the wonders of space depths. At times, even the first one took me out of the illusion - especially that dreadful Toy Time Galaxy. And there were times I could feel the emotive depth coming back to me in Galaxy 2, namely in the Cosmic Cove section.

Having actually built upon Rosalina's backstory in the first one helped a great deal. And I believe that's why she's a fan favorite in the Mario pantheon. The second one did push aside anything remnant of a story, it actually shipped you right into the platforming section without making you feel the excitement of running around spherical worlds and see the stars get lost into the Milky Way.