By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Close

Forums - Gaming Discussion - is showing superior graphics in E3 and Demos legal?

movie trailers can often contain scenes that differ from the actual movie, or dont appear in the movie at all. they are simply meant to show off the devs progress. its the fans who decide to look too far into what is being shown off



Around the Network

This reminds me of the killzone trailer



 "I think people should define the word crap" - Kirby007

Join the Prediction League http://www.vgchartz.com/predictions

Instead of seeking to convince others, we can be open to changing our own minds, and seek out information that contradicts our own steadfast point of view. Maybe it’ll turn out that those who disagree with you actually have a solid grasp of the facts. There’s a slight possibility that, after all, you’re the one who’s wrong.

Bullshots are perfectly legal. 20 years ago those would have been a huge risk for the company creating them due to backlash from gamers and gaming journalists alike (just look up Outpost or Command and Conquer: Tiberium Sun and how it turned out for them), but ever since the infamous Killzone 2 trailer, it seems like the publishers felt that the backlash is weaker than the cash the fake trailers generates in sales. Though if they do it too often or too obviously, then it still may backfire on them, especially on the long run when the lost trust of the more seasoned players generates a lower baseline for the sales.



It would only be illegal if they used that footage to advertise the full game release. As long as it says "game in development; May differ from final product" or something along those lines, they're golden.



Watch me stream games and hunt trophies on my Twitch channel!

Check out my Twitch Channel!:

www.twitch.tv/AzurenGames

Azuren said:
It would only be illegal if they used that footage to advertise the full game release. As long as it says "game in development; May differ from final product" or something along those lines, they're golden.

They usually use "in engine footage" which means absolutely nothing but is meant to mislead stupid people. But I guess that's marketing for you.



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.

Around the Network

They usually show a trailer with a disclaimer. Usually the much better looking trailers are footage of the game's engine, but not actual gameplay. Although lately I haven't seen that many major downgrades. It's usually worse at the start of a generation. As for why developers make good looking trailers. The whole point of a trailer is to generate hype and attention. Showing raw footage of the current build doesn't create hype, but criticism. The public pretty much demands these trailers, otherwise they deem it bad.

Last edited by Qwark - on 24 March 2018

Please excuse my (probally) poor grammar

It's a necessary evil. 
The games are still being worked on... So what a developer/publisher does is make a trailer that targets their visual goals.
Which means... Things are abound to change.

Unless of course you wish for the game trailer to look something like this:



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

I don't think there is a law that bans this, so it should not be illegal until now.



It's false advertising, so, it should be. But, you can't really sue until you buy the game and were actually fooled by it.

I also don't know if they can get scot free with some tiny letter saying it's still under development.

It's a shitty situation either way.

Bofferbrauer2 said:
Bullshots are perfectly legal. 20 years ago those would have been a huge risk for the company creating them due to backlash from gamers and gaming journalists alike (just look up Outpost or Command and Conquer: Tiberium Sun and how it turned out for them), but ever since the infamous Killzone 2 trailer, it seems like the publishers felt that the backlash is weaker than the cash the fake trailers generates in sales. Though if they do it too often or too obviously, then it still may backfire on them, especially on the long run when the lost trust of the more seasoned players generates a lower baseline for the sales.

 

The reason bullshots stopped being a thing is because no one looks at them anymore. We entered a video stage. A bs video definitly gathers more atention.

Last edited by Nem - on 25 March 2018

I get the impression that a lot of people think games START OUT looking like a finished product and then developers keep "downgrading" until it looks worse.

That's kind of funny.