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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - A Biased Review Reloaded - Radiant Historia: Perfect Chronology - The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild in Review One Year Later

Replayability by the standars of the OP is the highest. The game can be finished in a couple of hours (or in the case of speenrunners - so far - a single hour). Also there are multiple ways to finish the game. Considering that, I'm on my second playthrough and ready with at least 3 new ways to play it.

You cannot say the same about the other 3D Zeldas or 2D Zelda.



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RolStoppable said:
pokoko said:

There is no bandwagon and I have no clue what you're talking about with a victim card.  There is only you and people like you trying to discredit opinions rather than accept them as personal preference.  It's a video-game, there is no need for you to be arrogant and self-righteous because someone isn't carrying a faction flag.  I actually liked your review.  Then I see you preaching to someone about what is and is not immersion-breaking for them, as though you are some kind of authority.  That's beyond ridiculous.  You don't get to tell others what breaks immersion for them.  You don't have that right and you never will.  That kind of arrogance over playing a video-game just looks flat-out silly.

People are free to explain why using a quick menu to change weapons is immersion-breaking while going into the main menu for healing is not.

If you're good you don't need to heal during combat. Yet no matter how good you are, weapons will break during combat. There's the difference. Actually I never healed during the first 50 hours since everything after the great plateau could 1 hit kill me :) (going into Gerudo first)

The quick menu can be nicely abused though. Get a fire and ice rod or shock one and rapidly switch back and forth firing both like a machine gun, enemies can't even move and the rods are always charged. Good thing they break. I guess you can do the same with 2 shock blades.



RolStoppable said:
nitus10 said:

Personally, I think the review you have given is pretty good but that said the mention of a lack of a female character is not important. What is important is "Slarvax's" mention of the weapon durability mechanic.

I have seen reviews where the weapon durability is to be lauded and in others condemned. Personally, I don't have any issue with weapon durability and think it does add a more realist feel to a game if it is done correctly and IMHO it is not done correctly at least in the early stages of this game.

Pausing a game in the middle of a fight to change weapons because your last one broke is just busy work and breaks the immersion (the Souls games don't allow pausing). This would be acceptable if this type of thing happened once but multiple times during the same fight is not acceptable.

Games like the Souls series and The Witcher 3 (just to name a few) have the concept of weapon degradation and the requirement of weapon maintenance which is very easy to do since you can use repair kits in the field or visit a blacksmith as a priority when entering a town.

You need to pause the game in Breath of the Wild to heal yourself. Since nobody has mentioned this as immersion-breaking in the three weeks since its release, I don't buy into the argument that changing your weapon is immersion-breaking one bit, because consistent logic is not present. This is why the argument of immersion-breaking reeks of desperation to find flaws in Breath of the Wild and why I put it on the same level as criticism from feminists/social justice warriors. Treating such arguments with respect would give the impression that there is merit to them, but there won't be respect coming from my side if the other side is the first one who isn't respectful. You reap what you sow.

I know why there's no consistent logic on the topic of immersion-breaking gameplay. It's because people realize that consistent logic would expose how ridiculous their argument is. People are free to complain about the weapon durability in Zelda, but I am free to ignore problems that do not exist in my reviews. I am not going to address hypothetical problems that somebody somewhere might have, because I neither want to waste my or the readers' time. Regarding the weapon durability in Breath of the Wild we've had people play the game for a full two weeks with no major complaints before all of a sudden it became something that needed to be talked about. If it truly had been a problem, then it would have been talked about from day one because it's a gameplay mechanic that is present throughout the entire game and not something that is only introduced way down the line. And yes, I assign higher value to the opinions of people with first hand experience than those people who haven't played the game. It's the latter group that is responsible for the majority of complaints and concerns, that shouldn't be forgotten.

Best response ever!



Gameplay > Graphics

Substance > Style

Art Direction > Realism

pokoko said:

The need to prove that BotW has no flaws and that anyone who dislikes any aspect of it is wrong is actually what reeks of desperation.  I haven't seen that kind of self-righteous over-compensation in quite awhile.  I don't even really understand it.  We aren't talking about an average game that people are trying to prove is great, we're talking about a great game that people are hell-bent on proving is perfect, to the point they want to have any criticism nullified before god and scrubbed out of history.

Read Mjk45's post right after your own one. Complaints! Enjoy them.



Gameplay > Graphics

Substance > Style

Art Direction > Realism

F-Zero (Wii U Virtual Console)

The SNES launch title F-Zero impressed with its mode 7 graphics that allowed a 2D plain to be freely rotated around all three axis. Of course, nowadays everybody shrugs with their shoulders. But F-Zero was and is more than a mere tech demo for the SNES hardware, it's actually a great game despite quite a few shortcomings. There are only 15 courses and this already includes variations. Mute City is the first race in every cup and the differences are only marginal. Thankfully, the other course duos offer a bit more while the standalone locations are fine anyway. There's no time trial mode, but your best course and lap times are archived. They can be set in either grand prix or practice mode. Said practice mode is limited to seven courses for whatever reason. There is also no multiplayer, something that Super Mario Kart later on showed that it can be done.

Aside from the above, the lack of 3D graphics must also be noted. Racing games tend to benefit a lot from 3D graphics, and futuristic ones even moreso. But the technology wasn't there yet in 1990, so F-Zero serves racing on flat tracks instead. These tracks are filled with plenty of tricky sections and gimmicks, so the gameplay is interesting enough. The CPU drivers aren't shying away from ruthlessly bumping into you and additional challenge is provided by dummy vehicles that appear from lap 2 onward. Basically, you constantly lap moving obstacles. Completion of a lap (each race has five) earns you a boost that you can activate with a button press and they are usually best used to drive through dirty sections for some obvious shortcutting. At times it isn't a bad idea to save up a boost for when you get bumped around and lose lots of speed.

The goal in grand prix mode is to finish in the top 3 to proceed to the next race. There is no points system, but you aren't allowed to finish outside of the top 3 which can already prove difficult enough on expert and master difficulty. This holds especially true for the final course of the King Cup, Fire Field. It's a great way to conclude a game like this, because it gives winning (or even merely surviving) more meaning. I love this game. I can play it again and again. One hour is enough to play through all three cups, an amount of time that feels just right.

Controls 10 Very responsive. The four machines handle
different enough to make all of them worth playing.
Gameplay   Futuristic racing on flat courses with tricky corners
and various gimmicks.
Story   Not
available.
Single-player   Four difficulty settings provide plenty of challenge.
Opponents are aggressive.
Multiplayer   Not
available.
Graphics   Good sense of speed.
Some background elements flicker.
Sound   Only a small amount of music tracks,
but all compositions are of high quality.
Value   Only 15 tracks in three cups and a half-baked practice mode.
It shows that this was a SNES launch title.
Replay Value   Over 25 years after its original release, the game is
still always good for another round.
Score 8 Short on content, but very fun and replayable.
Now with 60 fps in PAL regions.


Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Shipments

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Wave Race 64 (Wii U Virtual Console)

Wave Race 64 has simplistic course layouts that are being made interesting by two defining traits. Firstly, waves have programmed starting points, so the player will have to adjust each lap to keep the ideal racing line. Secondly, buoys that need to be passed on either the left or the right side make things more challenging than they seem at first glance. This becomes especially apparent once you increase the difficulty, because each of the four championship series has its own course variations. There are only four racers, but a points system with no retries - you automatically move on to the next race even if you get disqualified for missing five buoys - and a minimum threshold demands your attention.

While I like the gameplay of Wave Race 64, it's kinda disappointing that there's no boost system like in the follow-up Wave Race: Blue Storm. The multiplayer is forgettable and I was never fond of stunt mode either; driving through rings and performing tricks gets old fast. But as long as the controls feel good and the main attraction of the game delivers, it's all good. That's the case here. The eight main courses each have unique traits. Sunny Beach is your typical basic intro track, Sunset Bay takes place during sunset (surprise!), Drake Lake greets you with fog that clears up over the duration of the race, Marine Fortress throws high waves at you, Port Blue provides has you racing around a harbor with a huge ship, Twilight City is a night course, Glacier Coast... you guessed it, ice. And finally, Southern Island lowers the water level and reveals more and more surface of the beach with each passing lap.

The Wii U Virtual Console version provides PAL regions with 60 fps.

Controls 10 The analog stick is used for steering and leaning the bodies
of the characters. Leaning back allows sharper turns.
Gameplay   Racing on water. Pass buoys on the correct side.
A boost system like in the sequel Blue Storm is missing.
Story   Not
available.
Single-player   Four difficulty settings, each with its own course variations.
Different waves each lap keep you on your toes.
Multiplayer   Only two-player-splitscreen with no CPU opponents
despite scaled back graphics.
Graphics   The focus was clearly on creating the water which benefits
the gameplay. Character models are blocky.
Sound   Oddly enough, the MIDI soundtrack has some memorable
tunes despite sounding quite cheap.
Value   29 course variations in championship mode. Time trial,
stunt mode and a barebones multiplayer mode.
Replay Value   Options for wave height, amount of laps and allowed misses
allow you to shake things up.
Score 8 Another Nintendo racing title with timeless gameplay. Looks rough
because it originated on the Nintendo 64, but plays great.


Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Shipments

Etrian Odyssey 2 Untold: The Fafnir Knight (3DS)

This is a remake of Etrian Odyssey 2 (DS) and it follows in the footsteps of the first Untold installment which was a remake of the very first game in the series. The biggest new additions compared to the original are a story mode with a predefined party of five that provides a more fleshed out, but not necessarily better story, plus an additional location with five floors. Personally I prefer the barebones approach of classic mode that focuses on the essentials, leaves it up to your imagination to fill in gaps and lets your own guild be adventurers; basically, the real story is what you play and your own struggles in the Yggdrasil labyrinth. Not that story mode is much different, but it isn't something that I would have ever needed from Etrian Odyssey. What sets EO2 apart from the other games in the series is that you don't go down a labyrinth, instead you go up a huge tree.

While story mode forces a premade set of five character classes on you - which has a good balance, so no worries here - classic mode allows you to choose your party configuration yourself as well as change it during the course of the game. There are more than a dozen of classes available and you'll be fine as long as you strike a balance between offense, defense, healing and specialities. Regardless of which mode you choose, your party will be set in two rows (back row takes less damage and is attacked less often) and engage in turn-based battles with the usual options of attack, defend, skills and items. The speed of the battles can be increased to a level of about five actions per second, so mowing down enemies that you know you can safely defeat is done almost instantly. The game is challenging in general though, unless you pick the lowest of the three difficulties; this can be changed even during the game, at least while you are in town.

Originally the Etrian Odyssey series asked you to draw your own map on the touchscreen as you go through the labyrinth, but by now there are full options for automapping floor tiles and walls, so people who find mapmaking too much of a hassle will only ever need to add icons for points of interest they come across. Worth of note is that all floors of the original Etrian Odyssey 2 were redesigned, so this remake is almost a new game. The grimoire stone system that was introduced in the first Untold got a major overhaul. The purpose of grimoire stones is to allow characters to either use skills that aren't part of their class or to strengthen what they already have. Up to six stones can be equipped for each member eventually, so your party will be quite versatile in the end. The major changes that were made pertain to how you obtain new grimoire stones. In the first Untold it was very random and very luck-based to get good grimoires, but in Untold 2 you can trade stones with NPCs, so even if you've been unlucky and got crappy level 1 stones, you can take 13 of them and trade them in for one level 4 stone. Keep playing the game and you will inevitably work your way up to a great selection of level 10 stones, because the NPCs have all the good stuff on offer.

Go into the labyrinth, kill monsters, sell their materials to the store in town, buy equipment made from the materials, go into the labyrinth again. It's the same thing over and over again, but it's highly addictive because the feeling of growth is tremendous in the Etrian Odyssey series. There are also NPCs that offer a variety of sidequests that provide item and EXP rewards as well as new sections in already explored floors and unique monster encounters, including terrifying bosses. There is always something to do. And once you've beat the game and perhaps also its post-game content, you can start a new game plus where you can toggle on or off plenty of options for things to carry over. It's of course possible to go from story mode to classic mode and vice versa. Best of all: For the first time in the series, there are multiple save files available as long as you have an SD card, so you don't need to overwrite precious save data.

Controls 10 Primarily menu-based, so unsurprisingly nothing
to complain about.
Gameplay   Dungeon crawler with turn-based battles. Draw your own
map on the touchscreen or let the game draw it for you.
Story   Story mode serves typical JRPG characters and tropes.
Classic mode leaves more things to your imagination.
Single-player   Play with a predefined party in story mode or create your
own party in classic mode to conquer the Yggdrasil labyrinth.
Multiplayer   Not
available.
Graphics   Not demanding on the hardware. 3D graphics are above
average, character portraits are nicely drawn.
Sound   A soundtrack that can be listened to for hours. Which is a must,
because you will listen to the same theme for hours.
Value   40-50 hours for the main quest, plus post-game content.
Two game modes with different takes on the story.
Replay Value   More than a dozen of character classes to create your party.
Numerous new game plus options.
Score 9 A remake that is totally worth it, even for owners of the original.
The most refined Etrian Odyssey to date.


Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Shipments

pokoko said:

The need to prove that BotW has no flaws and that anyone who dislikes any aspect of it is wrong is actually what reeks of desperation.  I haven't seen that kind of self-righteous over-compensation in quite awhile.  I don't even really understand it.  We aren't talking about an average game that people are trying to prove is great, we're talking about a great game that people are hell-bent on proving is perfect, to the point they want to have any criticism nullified before god and scrubbed out of history.

What I find kind of amusing is that I've personally complained about the mechanic of weapons breaking before on these forums--that is, in Fallout: New Vegas, one of my favorite games ever.  I can only assume that I was doing it in order to attack BotW, even though we knew nothing about it at that point.

You got it wrong. It is a great game, not perfect, but some are hell-bent to spoil the fun for others. This would met with mostly no or less critic, if said critics would just admit, that it is their personal opinion. There was a full thread there vivster - who you answer to - constantly wrote that weapon durability is a bad mechanic. I multiple time answered and offered it is his opinion, but he never took that. He always steered toward this being an objective flaw. Although in the same thread multiple people actually liked this mechanic (I'm indifferent about weapon durability). So why this desperation to paint something you personally dislike as an objective flaw?



3DS-FC: 4511-1768-7903 (Mii-Name: Mnementh), Nintendo-Network-ID: Mnementh, Switch: SW-7706-3819-9381 (Mnementh)

my greatest games: 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

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RolStoppable said:

Etrian Odyssey 2 Untold: The Fafnir Knight (3DS)

I like all the Etrian Odyssey games. I'm really into creating my own party. As the remakes have a storyline they give you predefined characters. But luckily the classic mode still gives you all options. So I'm really fine with the remakes and agree to your score and review.

Hopefully Atlus will announce more Etrian Odyssey for Switch, I was kinda shocked they were going the SMT-route. Nothing against SMT, but I have more fun with Etrian Odyssey and like the simpler approach. Also development of SMT is taking seemingly forever, so an EO for Switch would really, really be nice. (I would also take Persona Q, which basically is EO.)



3DS-FC: 4511-1768-7903 (Mii-Name: Mnementh), Nintendo-Network-ID: Mnementh, Switch: SW-7706-3819-9381 (Mnementh)

my greatest games: 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

10 years greatest game event!

bets: [peak year], [1], [2], [3], [4]

Xeodrifter (3DS eShop)

Renegade Kid, probably best known for Mutant Mudds, tried their hands on a Metroidvania game a couple of years ago. Skimming over reviews at the time, I could take away that Xeodrifter is good, but too short. For this reason I decided to wait until a sale and right now that is the case. The protagonist is stranded in a galaxy and needs to find a new warp core. Right from the start, you can choose from all four planets, although it quickly becomes evident that the game is quite linear.

My first impression wasn't good as it took a bit of time to get used to the controls and the health system is less than ideal. Instead of a more nuanced system, it's three hits and you are dead, or less than that against stronger foes. Enemies do not drop health either, so getting somewhere is quite difficult early on, especially because checkpoints exist only right before boss rooms. I warmed up to Xeodrifter once I found my first couple of gun upgrades. Things are fairer with a bit more health and a gun that actually does something.

The gun upgrades are the most interesting aspect of the game as you can freely distribute them among five categories and save up to three different settings that you can change on the fly. You can either make your shots travel faster, more powerful, more frequent, scattershot-like or move like Metroid's wave beam. Each of these categories can have six points attributed to them, but you will always have to choose because the twelve upgrades in the game aren't enough to fill out 30 slots. I found that shots travelling faster as well as that scattershot thingy are basically useless, so the distribution of upgrade points wasn't hard to decide.

Not too long after feeling better about my purchase, I came to realize that the bosses are all the same, just with different colors, more health and an additional trick each time you face one of them. The level design also became notorious for placing upgrades that you can't collect the first time at the very far end of the maps. The reason for that is that the game is still very short despite stretching its content like that. After only two hours I saw the credits roll, and these two hours included about 20 minutes of replaying sections because I died quite a few times. Conclusion: Xeodrifter is another one of those indie games that got good scores because reviewers are apparently already happy when what they are playing isn't a complete bust.

Controls 10 Takes some time to get used to the shooting and platforming.
A touchscreen button is used despite a free shoulder button.
Gameplay   Metroidvania that allows you to choose between all of its
locations from the get-go. In reality more limited.
Story   The intro doesn't provide more than the why, which is fine.
Complete lack of personality makes the game forgettable.
Single-player   Stringing functional basics of the genre together doesn't make
a good game. It merely avoids being bad.
Multiplayer   Not
available.
Graphics   8-bit art style with a solid technical execution.
Enemy designs are very ordinary.
Sound   8-bit music that is hard to say something about.
Nothing particularly memorable, so neither good or bad.
Value   Two hours to find and finish off the final boss.
Another 30 minutes to track down the remaining upgrades.
Replay Value   No additional difficulty settings, not even a timer.
Likely sufficient for a very quick Metroidvania fix.
Score 4 Decidedly mediocre, but with a hefty price tag. Xeodrifter is
only for people who have already played all of the alternatives.


Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Shipments