Forums - General Discussion - Have you noticed that there are "some" Asians in the West who try to hide their culture?

M.U.G.E.N said:
Marks said:
Badassbab said:
Marks said:
Don't know man, haven't really noticed. And this is coming from a guy who lives in Waterloo, Ontario...which has a huge asian population. It definitely looks funny seeing blonde hair on an Asian though its so obvious it isn't their hair colour and honestly they look a lot better with their regular black hair.

But here in Canada we cater to immigrants and allow them to act how they act in their home country. Which is kind of annoying really, if I visited China or Japan I'm not going to expect them to change their lifestyle to accommodate mine.


So in Canada you have to change your lifestyle to accomadate immigrants?


Not in some major way, but we are forced to watch what we say/do because God forbid we offend somebody from another race/country. E.g. We can't say Merry Christmas anymore, has to be Happy Holidays. 

is this required by law?


No not by law, but people get upset if you do. 



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Culture is a collection of memes and isn't tied to race. If you've been raised in a western culture then you can be western without being white. If my sisters boyfriend talked to you on the phone you wouldn't be able to tell that he's ethnically Chinese or that I'm partially Scandinavian/Celtic and English. You would hear someone with an Aussie accent thats lived their whole life in Australia and has a deep understanding of that culture. Let alone the fact that theres no such thing as one monolithic culture, every society has sub-cultures etc so I don't know what "Asian" culture actually is.

At the end of the day though. Who cares? A person can identify with whatever the hell they want to identify with. Don't be so totalitarian.



I think I arrived too late and missed all the fun. Why all the removed posts?

Anyway, I find it really strange that in Australia, as well as in America, many Asian people living here have taken a 'white' name. They call themselves things along the lines of 'Charles', or other very British, names. It seems a shame to me - when you go over to another country to experience their culture, I think it's nice if you take some of your culture over them for them to experience. I've always puzzled as to why this is done. Is it because it is expected that we'll mispronounce their names? Is it to try to fit in?

If anyone is in the situation of doing this (or the reverse, if you are a Caucasian living in Asia and have adopted an 'Asian name) could you let me know your reason for doing so?



If they were born at the States, they act like North Americans. If their parents don't show them their costums, they may not inherit them. If they know their costums and they still don't show them to others, maybe they don't see the need of doing stuff that make them stand out particularily before the society they live in.



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scottie said:
I think I arrived too late and missed all the fun. Why all the removed posts?

Anyway, I find it really strange that in Australia, as well as in America, many Asian people living here have taken a 'white' name. They call themselves things along the lines of 'Charles', or other very British, names. It seems a shame to me - when you go over to another country to experience their culture, I think it's nice if you take some of your culture over them for them to experience. I've always puzzled as to why this is done. Is it because it is expected that we'll mispronounce their names? Is it to try to fit in?

If anyone is in the situation of doing this (or the reverse, if you are a Caucasian living in Asia and have adopted an 'Asian name) could you let me know your reason for doing so?


They probably call their family members by their Asian names at home. They probably call their Asian friends by their English names in public because they are used to doing so since grade school to forever. 



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scottie said:
I think I arrived too late and missed all the fun. Why all the removed posts?

Anyway, I find it really strange that in Australia, as well as in America, many Asian people living here have taken a 'white' name. They call themselves things along the lines of 'Charles', or other very British, names. It seems a shame to me - when you go over to another country to experience their culture, I think it's nice if you take some of your culture over them for them to experience. I've always puzzled as to why this is done. Is it because it is expected that we'll mispronounce their names? Is it to try to fit in?

If anyone is in the situation of doing this (or the reverse, if you are a Caucasian living in Asia and have adopted an 'Asian name) could you let me know your reason for doing so?

i suppose some of these people live there for many generations, and they would probably do that because they realized it makes their life easier.

you know that people don't call themselves "charles or jim" names are chosen by their parents, and they might have been bullied in school for their "funny names" so they don't want to have their kids suffering the same.

just a thought.



“It appeared that there had even been demonstrations to thank Big Brother for raising the chocolate ration to twenty grams a week. And only yesterday, he reflected, it had been announced that the ration was to be reduced to twenty grams a week. Was it possible that they could swallow that, after only twenty-four hours? Yes, they swallowed it.”

- George Orwell, ‘1984’

scottie said:
I think I arrived too late and missed all the fun. Why all the removed posts?

Anyway, I find it really strange that in Australia, as well as in America, many Asian people living here have taken a 'white' name. They call themselves things along the lines of 'Charles', or other very British, names. It seems a shame to me - when you go over to another country to experience their culture, I think it's nice if you take some of your culture over them for them to experience. I've always puzzled as to why this is done. Is it because it is expected that we'll mispronounce their names? Is it to try to fit in?

If anyone is in the situation of doing this (or the reverse, if you are a Caucasian living in Asia and have adopted an 'Asian name) could you let me know your reason for doing so?

Offhand I'd say it's so that Western tongues don't butcher Eastern names, but from my own experience, it's not so common (giving oneself a western sounding name).

The only current examples I can think of offhand were an Asian studies professor I had when I lived in South Korea; North Korean, made the decision to stay in South Korea during the Korean War, went by the name Mark Monagan. The only other example I can remember is a former Japanese supervisor I had when I worked for Capcom, Takuya Shiraiwa, who went by the name "Tom" when he lived in the States. 

In Mark's case, I think he had his name legally changed (had US citizenship). In Tom's case, it was probably just easier for people in the States to call him Tom instead of Takuya, so it was more of a nickname than anything else. 

Maybe it's more common in Australia, but it's rare in California, even with the huge Asian population mix of first gen immigrants and multi generational native US born Asians.  



Porcupine_I said:
scottie said:

i suppose some of these people live there for many generations, and they would probably do that because they realized it makes their life easier.

you know that people don't call themselves "charles or jim" names are chosen by their parents, and they might have been bullied in school for their "funny names" so they don't want to have their kids suffering the same.

just a thought.


Ahh, you misunderstand me.

 

The people I am refering to, have a typical Asian name. This name was given to them by their parents, and is on all their official documents. It is their legal name. Then, when they move to a country (I haven't noticed it with 2nd generation immigrants) they pick, for themselves, with their parents having nothing whatsoever to do with it, a 'white' name, such as Charles. They do not officially change their legal name, they just tell all the people they meet that their name is Charles.

 

Maybe this only happens in Australia?



scottie said:
Porcupine_I said:
scottie said:

i suppose some of these people live there for many generations, and they would probably do that because they realized it makes their life easier.

you know that people don't call themselves "charles or jim" names are chosen by their parents, and they might have been bullied in school for their "funny names" so they don't want to have their kids suffering the same.

just a thought.


Ahh, you misunderstand me.

 

The people I am refering to, have a typical Asian name. This name was given to them by their parents, and is on all their official documents. It is their legal name. Then, when they move to a country (I haven't noticed it with 2nd generation immigrants) they pick, for themselves, with their parents having nothing whatsoever to do with it, a 'white' name, such as Charles. They do not officially change their legal name, they just tell all the people they meet that their name is Charles.

 

Maybe this only happens in Australia?

ah, ok, i get it now.

if i had to guess i suppose you are right, they believe it will help them to "fit in"

Most people migrate to other countries not because they want to spread their culture, but because they want a better life. and if they believe they can libve better in another country they would also believe it is because of how this country handles things, they wouldn't move there if they thought their own culture or traditions are superior to any other, so, i suppose they are liable to leave their past behind and try to adpat to the life in their new home.



“It appeared that there had even been demonstrations to thank Big Brother for raising the chocolate ration to twenty grams a week. And only yesterday, he reflected, it had been announced that the ration was to be reduced to twenty grams a week. Was it possible that they could swallow that, after only twenty-four hours? Yes, they swallowed it.”

- George Orwell, ‘1984’