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Forums - Music Discussion - How do Autistic People feel about this?

Norion said:
Dulfite said:

One of the first things I learned being a special education teacher (when I was one a couple years ago), one of the first things I learned in college for the degree, is that you NEVER, EVER place disability before the word "people." It is incredibly insulting. They are not autistic people. They are people (just like you and me) that happen to have autism. When you say Autistic person, or Downs Syndrome Person, or Traumatic Brain Injured Person, or ED Person, you are (whether you know it or not) indicating that these people are not the same as other people, that they are segregated from others with what we deem "normal" abilities. I know that their is a lot of ignorance out there, and those doing it ignorantly can't be blamed, but please change the OP title.

As for the video, I don't know the context. If it is someone with autism sharing what their experience is like in musical form, then I applaud their efforts here! If it is someone trying to make fun of people with autism, I have no words...

As an autistic person I don't see it as insulting. I am by definition not the same as other people since I have a disorder that makes me different from people who don't have it so it seems fine to me to categorize in that way. The whole don't put the disability before the person thing just seems like an overly PC gesture and I find gestures like that insulting personally.

You are now the second to bring this up. I haven't heard this perspective before in my years of educational training and being an educator, so thank you for sharing! 



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Love(d?) Sia but after her LSD project I think this bitch took some LSD because she been tweakin



Dulfite said:
Norion said:

As an autistic person I don't see it as insulting. I am by definition not the same as other people since I have a disorder that makes me different from people who don't have it so it seems fine to me to categorize in that way. The whole don't put the disability before the person thing just seems like an overly PC gesture and I find gestures like that insulting personally.

You are now the second to bring this up. I haven't heard this perspective before in my years of educational training and being an educator, so thank you for sharing! 

Thank you for responding to this different perspective well! Many people would get defensive and hostile so good on ya for not getting like that at all. A suggestion I have is to not get offended on behalf of others for small things. If you feel that something is offensive to a certain group it's often best to see if people from said group are actually offended by it instead of speaking for them. If it's something genuinely hateful then speaking up regardless is fine but if it's something like this where it's something semantical or a joke the people it's directed at could be fine with it. Basically unless it's clear hateful stuff it's best not to assume how it'll be taken.



Norion said:
Dulfite said:

You are now the second to bring this up. I haven't heard this perspective before in my years of educational training and being an educator, so thank you for sharing! 

Thank you for responding to this different perspective well! Many people would get defensive and hostile so good on ya for not getting like that at all. A suggestion I have is to not get offended on behalf of others for small things. If you feel that something is offensive to a certain group it's often best to see if people from said group are actually offended by it instead of speaking for them. If it's something genuinely hateful then speaking up regardless is fine but if it's something like this where it's something semantical or a joke the people it's directed at could be fine with it. Basically unless it's clear hateful stuff it's best not to assume how it'll be taken.

I try to not be defensive and angry in general, and I find it especially easy to not get that way when someone presents their perspective in a calm friendly way like you did.

In my experience in special education, I worked with middle and high school students primarily. When other students would call them that, or call others that have no disability that, they absolutely would mean it in an insulting way (like Reddit) and it would boil my blood. I suppose I've been conditioned to just assume when people use that before the word person that they are insulting people because I'm used to working with teenagers. I shouldn't assume the worst, it's hard not to do so though working where I worked.

Last edited by Dulfite - on 23 February 2021

Dulfite said:
Norion said:

Thank you for responding to this different perspective well! Many people would get defensive and hostile so good on ya for not getting like that at all. A suggestion I have is to not get offended on behalf of others for small things. If you feel that something is offensive to a certain group it's often best to see if people from said group are actually offended by it instead of speaking for them. If it's something genuinely hateful then speaking up regardless is fine but if it's something like this where it's something semantical or a joke the people it's directed at could be fine with it. Basically unless it's clear hateful stuff it's best not to assume how it'll be taken.

I try to not be defensive and angry in general, and I find it especially easy to not get that way when someone presents their perspective in a calm friendly way like you did.

In my experience in special education, I worked with middle and high school students primarily. When other students would call them that, or call others that have no disability that, they absolutely would mean it in an insulting way (like Reddit) and it would boil my blood. I suppose I've been conditioned to just assume when people use that before the word person that they are insulting people because I'm used to working with teenagers. I shouldn't assume the worst, it's hard not to do so though working where I worked.

If your experience had mostly been people being insulting then that is understandable. I'm only in my early 20's but dealing with teenagers still sounds like a nightmare lol.



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Norion said:
Dulfite said:

I try to not be defensive and angry in general, and I find it especially easy to not get that way when someone presents their perspective in a calm friendly way like you did.

In my experience in special education, I worked with middle and high school students primarily. When other students would call them that, or call others that have no disability that, they absolutely would mean it in an insulting way (like Reddit) and it would boil my blood. I suppose I've been conditioned to just assume when people use that before the word person that they are insulting people because I'm used to working with teenagers. I shouldn't assume the worst, it's hard not to do so though working where I worked.

If your experience had mostly been people being insulting then that is understandable. I'm only in my early 20's but dealing with teenagers still sounds like a nightmare lol.

It certainly can be, but what's worse is having nightmare administrators who don't support teachers and do everything they can to overburden them. That's what drove me out of it.



The consensus among the vast majority of Autistics I know and have contact with through work, support groups, forums, and social media, is that they find Sia's portrayal of Autism in the film Music to be disrespectful and inaccurate.

I haven't seen the movie myself but that film clip, yikes.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

curl-6 said:

The consensus among the vast majority of Autistics I know and have contact with through work, support groups, forums, and social media, is that they find Sia's portrayal of Autism in the film Music to be disrespectful and inaccurate.

I haven't seen the movie myself but that film clip, yikes.

Thanks for the update.

Just out of curiosity, did you talk to anyone that is more on the extreme end of the spectrum (who can still communicate)? What was their reaction?



 

 

Cobretti2 said:
curl-6 said:

The consensus among the vast majority of Autistics I know and have contact with through work, support groups, forums, and social media, is that they find Sia's portrayal of Autism in the film Music to be disrespectful and inaccurate.

I haven't seen the movie myself but that film clip, yikes.

Thanks for the update.

Just out of curiosity, did you talk to anyone that is more on the extreme end of the spectrum (who can still communicate)? What was their reaction?

Only one, a non-verbal man named Tim who communicates by typing. He's of the general opinion that Autistic roles in film and television should be played by Autistic actors. I know a few others on the more extreme end of the spectrum but they can't really communicate something as complex as an opinion on representation in the media.



Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.

curl-6 said:
Cobretti2 said:

Thanks for the update.

Just out of curiosity, did you talk to anyone that is more on the extreme end of the spectrum (who can still communicate)? What was their reaction?

Only one, a non-verbal man named Tim who communicates by typing. He's of the general opinion that Autistic roles in film and television should be played by Autistic actors. I know a few others on the more extreme end of the spectrum but they can't really communicate something as complex as an opinion on representation in the media.

That is pretty cool that he can communicate in some way. 

My young nephew can't communicate, so hopefully he has some hope when he gets older by learning some form of communicating. When he saw the video I suspected that he would get a sensory overload with all the flickering in the clip and that is what happened so not sure how this clip is meant to make people feel better.