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Forums - General Discussion - Coronavirus (COVID-19) Discussion Thread

Some in the UK have been discussing the possibility of another wave after the openings, but if over 20% at risk people outright refuse a vaccine that's readily available to them, as it should be in a couple of months, should society as a whole even give a damn? Legally enforce vaccination, then, or at least presume they waivered their right to a hospital bed if someone else needs it...



 

 

 

 

 

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I'm finally got scheduled for my first shot tomorrow morning. I'm excited for it and my 2nd one a month later. I see a massive 32 oz. juicy steak at a fancy restaurant in my future. I have not been in public since March of 2020.



...to avoid getting banned for inactivity, I may have to resort to comments that are of a lower overall quality and or beneath my moral standards.

First I'm hearing about this covid related condition that affects children. This poor kid...

https://www.newsweek.com/boy-arms-legs-amputated-after-developing-covid-linked-condition-mis-c-1571353



SvennoJ said:

While on the one side we're getting the death rate down, on the other, long term symptoms seem to be more widespread than previously thought.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/almost-a-third-of-people-with-mild-covid-19-still-battle-symptoms-months-later-study-finds-1.5316239

A new research letter published Friday in the journal JAMA Network Open is shedding new light on the condition. Researchers from the University of Washington followed 177 people with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection for up to nine months -- the longest follow-up to date. Notably, this group included 150 outpatients, who had "mild" disease and were not hospitalized.

They found that 30 per cent of respondents reported persistent symptoms. The most common were fatigue and loss of smell or taste. More than 30 per cent of respondents reported worse quality of life compared to before getting sick. And 14 participants (8 per cent) -- including nine people who had not been hospitalized -- reported having trouble performing at least one usual activity, such as daily chores.

The researchers wrote that with 57.8 million cases worldwide, "even a small incidence of long-term debility could have enormous health and economic consequences."

A much larger study, published in early January in The Lancet, found that of 1,733 coronavirus patients treated in the Chinese city of Wuhan, 76 per cent were still experiencing at least one symptom six months after their symptoms began. But this group was made up entirely of hospitalized patients.


Stress can cause a lot symptoms as well yet some things are too specific like loss of smell and taste.

As for what is causing those symptoms, Sandrock points to several culprits. Some might be caused by the complications of an extended hospital or ICU stay, which is known to be hard on the body and have lasting effects. Some could be triggered by microvascular disease -- damage to the capillaries, which Sandrock says is behind many symptoms, from chest pain to "COVID toes" to fatigue and even brain fog. Some symptoms could be set off by an autoimmune response triggered by high levels of inflammation, such as joint and body aches, sleep disturbances, depression and fatigue. And some could be as a direct infection by the virus, such as loss of smell and/or taste, according to Sandrock.

And 20 years from now we'll find out that it's an oncogenic virus, because COVID19 is vile that way. 



LurkerJ said:
SvennoJ said:

While on the one side we're getting the death rate down, on the other, long term symptoms seem to be more widespread than previously thought.

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/almost-a-third-of-people-with-mild-covid-19-still-battle-symptoms-months-later-study-finds-1.5316239

A new research letter published Friday in the journal JAMA Network Open is shedding new light on the condition. Researchers from the University of Washington followed 177 people with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection for up to nine months -- the longest follow-up to date. Notably, this group included 150 outpatients, who had "mild" disease and were not hospitalized.

They found that 30 per cent of respondents reported persistent symptoms. The most common were fatigue and loss of smell or taste. More than 30 per cent of respondents reported worse quality of life compared to before getting sick. And 14 participants (8 per cent) -- including nine people who had not been hospitalized -- reported having trouble performing at least one usual activity, such as daily chores.

The researchers wrote that with 57.8 million cases worldwide, "even a small incidence of long-term debility could have enormous health and economic consequences."

A much larger study, published in early January in The Lancet, found that of 1,733 coronavirus patients treated in the Chinese city of Wuhan, 76 per cent were still experiencing at least one symptom six months after their symptoms began. But this group was made up entirely of hospitalized patients.


Stress can cause a lot symptoms as well yet some things are too specific like loss of smell and taste.

As for what is causing those symptoms, Sandrock points to several culprits. Some might be caused by the complications of an extended hospital or ICU stay, which is known to be hard on the body and have lasting effects. Some could be triggered by microvascular disease -- damage to the capillaries, which Sandrock says is behind many symptoms, from chest pain to "COVID toes" to fatigue and even brain fog. Some symptoms could be set off by an autoimmune response triggered by high levels of inflammation, such as joint and body aches, sleep disturbances, depression and fatigue. And some could be as a direct infection by the virus, such as loss of smell and/or taste, according to Sandrock.

And 20 years from now we'll find out that it's an oncogenic virus, because COVID19 is vile that way. 

Scientists will have a lot of trouble trying to pin it on COVID-19 in 20 years when they also have to consider COVID-25, COVID-33 and COVID-40A and COVID-40B.



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.

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Finally got my first shot scheduled for Thursday. Moderna, oddly, though I live not far from the big Pfizer manufacturing facility.



Do you think there is any chance that your country will make the end of the pandemic a holiday? I certainly think it being a worldwide holiday could be significant.



my grandma got her second dose today and my mother her first the other day



P1 variant is spreading in Brazil and it hits like a truck. Hospitalizations more than doubled in some places as little as three weeks. It can spread fairly quickly even in places without previous outbreaks and it outcompetes the P2 variant as much as the others, so it looks like the N501Y mutation drives its spread far more than some spike antibody resistance from the E484K mutation (which was already present in a lot of places with P2).

The number of people in ICUs is, well, sky-high. Higher than the peaks in Europe during either wave, except it's a plateau and not a peak. The only reason deaths aren't as high is because the population is younger (meaning that they tend to survive treatment but also occupy beds for a bit longer).

You guys know I'm not a fan of all that media terrorizing and harsh restrictions, but when we're at a point when we can't at least give people a fighting chance in a hospital? Yeah, we'll need more distancing for a time.



 

 

 

 

 

Still no end in sight, cases are rising again

In total 2.74 million new cases were reported last week (up from 2.52 million) to a total of 113,976,097 cases reported worldwide.
Also another 65,855 deaths were reported (down from 70,082) to a total of 2,743,341 casualties.

Europe is on the rise again, deaths still declining for now. The USA is rising as well, more slowly but reported deaths also went slightly up.

The continents

Europe reported 982K new cases (up from 893K) and 22,295 more deaths (down from 25,668)
North America reported 633K new cases (up from 605K) and 21,857 more deaths (down from 23,232)
South America reported 555K new cases (up from 487K) and 12,506 more deaths (slightly up from 12,399)
Asia reported 499K new cases (up from 454K) and 6,738 more deaths (up from 5,878)
Africa reported 73.1K new cases (down from 80.9K) and 2,455 more deaths (down from 2,901)
Oceania reported 381 new cases and 4 deaths

Corners of the world

USA reported 533K new cases (up from 497K) and 15,336 more deaths (slightly up from 15,225)
Brazil reported 376K new cases (up from 316K) and 8,033 more deaths (up from 7,354)
India reported 102K new cases (up from 84.2K) and 730 deaths (652 last week)
Iran reported 57.0K new cases (up from 54.4K) and 558 deaths (532 last week)
Canada reported 20.9K new cases (slightly up from 20.3K) and 339 deaths (414 last week)
South Africa reported 10.1K new cases (down from 13.0K) and 925 deaths (1,189 last week)
Japan reported 7,505 new cases (down from 10,216) and 448 deaths (500 last week)
South Korea reported 2,778 new cases (down from 3,291) and 35 deaths (43 last week)
Australia reported 40 new cases, no deaths

Europe in detail

UK and Ireland seem to have adjusted to the UK strain, not rising (yet). The rest of Europe is feeling the higher infection rate.

India is concerning, more virulent strains can turn all the progress made around pretty fast. Same as in Brazil.