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Forums - Gaming Discussion - Emotional attachment to consoles/games

John2290 said:
Not silly at all. All through my childhood into my teens games were a bonding experience with family and friends right from the NES as I watch ed and got to play 10% of the time as a small child to my first console the ps1 and Ps2 heading into puberty and beyond right to it's third iteration as a teenager and legal adult. It's always been an emotional hook which has nurtured some of my fondest, safest, warmest and impactful memories with others and even by myself. That is until the ps4 where I've become a mostly reclusive gamer in adulthood in person, some sparce online gaming or borrowing/lending games and hardware is about as close as it gets to those days of huddling/fighting/bonding around a screen as a child or relaxing/partying/recovering around a screen as a young adult. Vgchartz is mostly where I chat games now a good 90% of the time, I'd say it's the replacment for that.
So no. Not silly at all. And welcome to Vgchartz.

That's sweet, it's nice that you're able to bond with your friends and family by gaming . It creates a lot of good memories.  

And thanks (: 



If you require alcohol to have fun, then you have a problem

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RolStoppable said:
LittleSnake said:

Do you also kiss it goodnight?

No, but I hum Zelda's Lullaby.

Well, whatever helps it sleep at night 



If you require alcohol to have fun, then you have a problem

AngryLittleAlchemist said:
When I was 12 I had an emotional connection with my Xbox too. It became physical. Needless to say, my disc drive stopped working the next day. R.I.P.

At least you had your fun 



If you require alcohol to have fun, then you have a problem

I bought my Nintendo DS Lite with my own money as a child, pretty sure that cost me ~$200 AUD, and while that's nothing today, it was a fair bi to a child.
That was the first time I bought an electronic device for myself, and having proper ownership over something, something that I had wanted and had worked for was very satisfying.
Playing it quickly became my favorite pastime.

It wasn't my first handheld device, that would've been my GBA Advance SP, that I received as a xmas present a year or two before hand, and that I also enjoyed to its fullest.
My NDS Lite was different though, I owned it for much longer, played it for longer periods of time, made friends with it, fought my little brother because of it.
Actually, I sold the GBA to be able to afford the NDS, I wasn't happy about that, but how else is a little child supposed to earn enough money.

Mmm, one of the reasons that made me really want a DS, was the GBAs dwindling software support.
I was kinda angry at Nintendo for abandoning the GBA, every time I went into a game store, the GBA section would be smaller and smaller.
What else is a child supposed to feel.

Oh, and to the people who advocate for Nintendo to just kill off 3DS's software support, and focus on the Switch.
Remember that it barely takes anything from them to make 3DS games.
They can basically throw ten people in a room for a year and crank out a new high end 3DS game, compared to the 50+ team it would take for a similarly positioned Switch game.
The 3DS doesn't really drain resources away from Switch titles.

So yeah.
I don't own my DS Lite anymore.
Even though I played with it for over a thousand of hours, easily: it just isn't something I need in my life now.
My little brother has ownership of the DS, and he doesn't really use it all too much.
I've a high end PC, and that can play anything I want it to (basically everything).
While my PC is a big part of my life right now, I'm not attached to it emotionally.
It's hard for me to get attached to the individual components, as I'd prefer them be used in other machines, and make other people happy.



Barkley said:

I thought this was going to be a thread about the psychology behind brand loyalty and fanboyism...

"I'd dust it everyday, keep a blanket over it to prevent dust from landing on it, panic if someone touched, let alone move it. I’m always worried when I turn it on, it’ll stop working, and we won’t be able to fix it."

No I've never really been significantly attached to the unique console I owned, I'd just get another one if it broke. My nostalgia comes from the experiences not the actual metal and parts.

This is exactly the same for me, with the exception of my late father's PSP.  My father and I shared a love for gaming. In fact, he is certainly mostly responsible for me getting into the hobby. Gis PSP was his primary gaming device at the time of his death. So I do have some emotional attachment to that particular unit.



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PwerlvlAmy said:
A lot of people say they aren't attached to a console but theirs/our posts say otherwise. Were all attached emotionally whether we like to admit it or not. Were invested.

They just haven't accepted the truth yet 



If you require alcohol to have fun, then you have a problem

I'm attached to my majoras mask box catridge N64 game



I game on all consoles and PC

LittleSnake said:
PwerlvlAmy said:
A lot of people say they aren't attached to a console but theirs/our posts say otherwise. Were all attached emotionally whether we like to admit it or not. Were invested.

They just haven't accepted the truth yet 

Denial is a powerful force on VGC.
It's probably for the best if you learn that quickly.





*stepping away from OP and keeping distance...

Hunting Season is done...

Zoombael said:


*stepping away from OP and keeping distance...

Smart move.