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Forums - Politics Discussion - Is the United States really a developed country?

I've lived in the Chicago-land area for my entire life, which is one of the largest cities in America.

With more than 7 billion people in the world, I oftentimes find myself wondering how I got so lucky to be born with so many natural advantages (white, American, male). I try not to take these things for granted, as there are many less fortunate individuals that struggle to make ends meat.

I believe that most would agree (although some would not like to admit it) that many people who live in other parts of the world are envious of Americans. With so many people from all over the world immigrating to the US, I would imagine that many people know somebody in their life who has moved here. And in many cases, that person who moved to the US was maybe less deserving than you.

And knowing that said person is now making more money and living a more successful life than you, despite maybe having a less desirable job, can feel unfair. Thus, people form negative opinions of the US and latch onto any negative press. In fact, hearing people say negative things about the US makes you feel a little bit better about your own situation.

It's common for people to dislike something that they themselves cannot be a part of. We see this everywhere.

"I own a PS4. I hate Xbox."
"I don't make a lot of money. I don't care about material things."
"I live in Europe. I don't like the US."

The United States is the most influential country on Earth.

Edit: Not trying to offend anyone here. I have no hard feelings for these individuals and can completely understand their frustration.

Last edited by RaptorChrist - on 13 July 2018

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kopstudent89 said:

One thing that dictates why the US is so different is the Geography. It's huge, with people living all over (something Canada doesn't have as bad). And let's say in the UK, it's easier to control a more densely populated country, so much so the police don't need guns. #

Regarding poverty, the fact is Europe has social housing for all and I have noticed that the amount of homelessness in the US is relatively high compared. I'm guessing this goes back to certain policies and some cultural things (like how socialism is frowned upon in the States while in Europe it's part of the fabric of society).

I think it's more of a cultural thing, the gun issue 



How ironic it is whenever our weaknesses are brought up (i.e. healthcare and education) people think it's the government's responsibility to take the reigns and control the issue. However, these same people also believe that the government is always corrupt and shouldn't be allowed to touch anything.

As an American myself, this hypocrisy is why I think America gets a bad rep. No one knows what they actually want, and when they think they get something good, they praise it, until it ends up backfiring and then they start complaining again. I have a general distrust of the government, and as such I praise drawbacks on government mandated healthcare and tax cuts, mostly because that is government backing up and getting out of my business.



Yes. Our politicians just have underdeveloped brains.



Jon-Erich said:

As for the crime rate, a lot of that comes with population. The US has a population of 325 million people. Japan has a population of 126 million. Canada has a population of 37 million. Then you get to the European countries, their population figures are also in the tens of millions. So it would make more sense for the US to have more crime. However, crime in the US is currently the lowest it has been in decades. There are pockets of areas with high crime rates, but that can be blamed mostly on incompetent politicians in local governments.

Crime rates are usually done in crimes per 100k people or something like that, so the population has already been accounted for and is therefore irrelevant. The US just has a lot more crime per person than other developed countries.



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RaptorChrist said:

I've lived in the Chicago-land area for my entire life, which is one of the largest cities in America.

With more than 7 billion people in the world, I oftentimes find myself wondering how I got so lucky to be born with so many natural advantages (white, American, male). I try not to take these things for granted, as there are many less fortunate individuals that struggle to make ends meat.

I believe that most would agree (although some would not like to admit it) that many people who live in other parts of the world are envious of Americans. With so many people from all over the world immigrating to the US, I would imagine that many people know somebody in their life who has moved here. And in many cases, that person who moved to the US was maybe less deserving than you.

And knowing that said person is now making more money and living a more successful life than you, despite maybe having a less desirable job, can feel unfair. Thus, people form negative opinions of the US and latch onto any negative press. In fact, hearing people say negative things about the US makes you feel a little bit better about your own situation.

It's common for people to dislike something that they themselves cannot be a part of. We see this everywhere.

"I own a PS4. I hate Xbox."
"I don't make a lot of money. I don't care about material things."
"I live in Europe. I don't like the US."

The United States is the most influential country on Earth.

Edit: Not trying to offend anyone here. I have no hard feelings for these individuals and can completely understand their frustration.

A lot of that is simply wrong. A lot of the people here who are discussing this are Canadian or European. I can assure you we're not envious, and we can make just as much money and be just as successful as Americans, except it's actually easier for us because we don't have to pay a fortune for education



pastro243 said:
kopstudent89 said:

One thing that dictates why the US is so different is the Geography. It's huge, with people living all over (something Canada doesn't have as bad). And let's say in the UK, it's easier to control a more densely populated country, so much so the police don't need guns. #

Regarding poverty, the fact is Europe has social housing for all and I have noticed that the amount of homelessness in the US is relatively high compared. I'm guessing this goes back to certain policies and some cultural things (like how socialism is frowned upon in the States while in Europe it's part of the fabric of society).

I think it's more of a cultural thing, the gun issue 

Gun violence is highest in urban, densely populated areas and it overwhelmingly a gang problem.

The five most dangerous counties (all Democrats) have 68% of all murders. According to a 2013 PEW Research Center survey, the household gun ownership rate in rural areas was 2.11 times greater than in urban areas... Despite lower gun ownership, urban areas experience much higher murder rates.

https://crimeresearch.org/2017/04/number-murders-county-54-us-counties-2014-zero-murders-69-1-murder/

Mexico has 5x the murder rate of the US, but strict gun control, again a gang problem foremost.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate



HomokHarcos said:

Mississippi is pretty poor

 

Mississippi has an average household income of 40K which is higher than many western European nations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_income



numberwang said:
HomokHarcos said:

Mississippi is pretty poor

 

Mississippi has an average household income of 40K which is higher than many western European nations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_by_income

Source for median household income in western European nations?

Edit: Even if you do have a source (which I doubt), household income is not a good one to compare wealth by. It could mean people there are wealthier than in a place with lower household income, it could also just mean that the people there are too poor to be able to move out of their family homes and therefore there are a lot less households and thus obviously a higher average income per household. If you want to make a fairer comparison, look for the average wage per person, rather than per household.

Last edited by Ka-pi96 - on 13 July 2018

numberwang said:
pastro243 said:

I think it's more of a cultural thing, the gun issue 

Gun violence is highest in urban, densely populated areas and it overwhelmingly a gang problem.

The five most dangerous counties (all Democrats) have 68% of all murders. According to a 2013 PEW Research Center survey, the household gun ownership rate in rural areas was 2.11 times greater than in urban areas... Despite lower gun ownership, urban areas experience much higher murder rates.

 

Okay, that is some very misleading data if I've ever sawn it. First of all, 5 counties != 5% of counties.. 5% of counties = 150 counties with highest *absolute number* of murders, here. Not murder rates. Important, because;

 

the 150 largest counties, of the US, also happen to have well over 50% of the US population.

 

On the other hand, 1881 out of 3242 US counties have a population of less than 20k, which means that by pure probability, it's unlikely for them to have a murder with a national homicide rate of 5/100k.

 

As a whole... this is just a chart of US population distribution. Congrats.

 

I definitely disagree with saying that the US isn't a developed country - it definitely is, by almost all metrics, economic, but also education, as well as socially, even if the OP would deny it. But, as a such, it really shouldn't put it's aims at besting Mexico in any statistics. 

 

Among all developed nations, the US stands out strikingly for its homicide rate. It's also definitely not a problem isolated to a select few locations, as you attempted to claim.

 

*ALL 50* US states have homicide rates higher than that of the EU (1.1) - the most obvious counterparts, worldwide. This is, actually, rather bizarre, as within those 50 states, it's possible to find high and low gun ownership, tighter or looser regulation, rural and urban populations, culturally diverse and uniform populations, etc... and yet, none of these factors usually blamed for criminality seem to be sufficient to push the homicide rate down to the expected level. My best guess would be a cultural issue, deeply ingrained within American identity. Canada, culturally, isn't too far off, which could explain its own rather high rate of 1.68 (still lower than the US - but definitely room for improvement).



Bet with PeH: 

I win if Arms sells over 700 000 units worldwide by the end of 2017.

Bet with WagnerPaiva:

 

I win if Emmanuel Macron wins the french presidential election May 7th 2017.