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Forums - Gaming Discussion - Ubisoft CEO Says Next Console Generation Will Be The Last

 

How do you feel about cloud-based gaming?

I love it 7 22.58%
 
I hate it 24 77.42%
 
Total:31

The easier reply is that Ninty won't do it for a long long time at least. As we know Nintendo does it's own thing everytime. And it won't do it until streaming us stable enough. At the very least we'll have many more Nintendo generations to come. Also first the console market needs to go all digital before it goes streaming. Right now the majority of sales are still from physical games. It will take at least 2 gens for the console makers to be comfortable enough to release an all digital platform. But we'll see



Just a guy who doesn't want to be bored. Also

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CaptainExplosion said:
Pemalite said:
As long as I have a need to upgrade my PC, there will likely still be a need to upgrade my consoles.
Streaming video games doesn't do it for me due to the added latency and all that.

It just becomes so unnecessarily cumbersome. Why would anyone want THIS to be the future of gaming?

Its inevitable. At the point at which it stops becoming cumbersome (10-20years), it'll become the dominant form of consumption. He may be a generation off but you're merely clinging onto tradition if you don't think having the ability to stream any title on any piece of hardware won't be a compelling option for consumers. Also the death of console generations doesn't mean the death of physical hardware.



Well, he knows how to be popular



A bit short sighted. As much as I want to believe it I very much doubt it.



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.

Aeolus451 said:
He's talking out of his ass. Some of the publishers want traditional home consoles to die off so they can move completely to digital only gaming.

^ This. Subscription models make far more money in the long run than just selling someone a physical copy of a game. Just look at how 3DS Max, and Photoshop have to be rented on a monthly basis. Photoshop alone used to cost just $500, for the disks. But now you have to pay for a subscription for $10 a month. After five years you've paid way more from the subscription, than you did for a physical copy of Photoshop. 

But they can't implement a subscription service to individual games without killing off those pesky physical disks first. 

So just imagine having to pay $10 to $20 a month to play your favorite $60 AAA title. Oh look! They just increased the price by a lot and there's not a damned thing you can do about it, because everything is digital now!



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Doesn't bring streaming services not just a higher latency, but also a worse image quality? The picture has to be compressed as far as I know due to the very low bandwidth that's called the internet.

I tried to stream a game via valve's dedicated app over my local network (1Gbit/s). It was from my PC to the TV. Resolution was in 4k. But the result was more than bad, honestly. I just can't accept this to be the future of gaming. Especially if you compare the amount of raw data that is transferred from the console directly to the TV via HDMI. (HDMI 1.4 is about 8.16 Gbits/s.) For cloud services, you have to bring that number down. … No streaming for me. Thank you.



Intel Core i7 8700K | 32 GB DDR 4 PC 3200 | ROG STRIX Z370-F Gaming | RTX 3090 FE| Asus PG27UQ gaming on 3840 x 2160 @120 Hz GSYNC HDR| HTC Vive Pro :3

Reached PC master race level.

I think this may be the case. Whether the Switch to cloud gaming is ready by then, or alternatively a more incremental upgrade route becomes permanent, "generations" are ending.



CaptainExplosion said:
Pemalite said:

Oh for sure, there is a big focus on Ray Tracing at the moment... And A.I.
Next gen will likely see the biggest leap on the CPU side.

I do think next gen will be a little longer than this console generation though, mostly because we will probably be stuck at 10nm/7nm for a fairly long time.

 

10nm/7nm?

Fabrication Process. Not all foundries will be on the same node. Not all nodes will be at their "advertised" geometries either.

sergiodaly said:
No... local processing power will always be better... no matter what the internet infrastructure is... just a example, all the vanilla ps4, all of them together have over 130 exaflops of processing power... 130 000 petaflops... the biggest supercomputer today has 125 petaflops and uses over 15 000 kw of electricity... we would need over 1000 of these just so everyone could play a ps4 game at the same time... since ps4 has 1.8 teraflops and xbox one x has 6 and next gen will have over 10 teraflops... the math doesn't add up... yes, not everyone plays at the same time and this back of a napkin math... but it's just to show... it's much easier to say than done...

There is more to performance than flops.


HoloDust said:
Depends on how low latency over internet can get in next 10 years, but he's probably right - streaming services are the future.

There will always be latency, the laws of Physics does come into play in that regard.
That is... The greater the distance, the greater the delay.

Not to mention all the hubs, switches, modems, towers and other equipment add their own delay as well.



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

I admit console gaming is a dinosaur on it's last legs, but I don't see "streaming" as being the thing that kills it. In fact, it could very well transform through innovation as Nintendo has been trying to make happen. In fact, I don't even see how cloud gaming/streaming will even affect the console industry.

I personally think that the console industry is outdated, but oldschoolers from both the industry and the general public are keeping it alive because it's what they're used to.

I think the far bigger threat to the console industry is the stagnation of graphics. There's not much gain in graphics anymore from one generation to the next, so eventually consoles will become irrelevant.



it'll probably happen eventually.