Forums - General Discussion - Should I wait for OLED to drop or just buy 4K LED now?

Azuren said:
jakemania said:

I have a 55" 2015 OLED that I use as my computer monitor and frequently game on. I have had no issues with burn in or image retention at all. I also have a 2017 65" OLED that I haven't had any issues with either.

I just simply don't believe you. I'm sorry, but OLED technology doesn't work like that, and you're either not using an OLED or lying because your computer monitor would have burnt something in the first year. 

Not sure why it's so hard to believe. Phones have been using OLED/AMOLED screens for years. Sure, some have burn-in/IR, but that doesn't mean every single screen is going to have issues. I have the 55EC9300 and the OLED65C7P. 

Edit: Thanks Hynad, I guess that makes my point for me.

Hynad said: 

But you're making a bigger deal out of burn-in that it is"

From the link a shared:

SCREEN BURN-IN

"We include this section begrudgingly, both because burn-in is a misnomer (that’s just an aggravation) and, for most folks, the effect will not be an issue.

The effect we’ve come to know as burn-in stems from the days of the boxy CRT TV, when prolonged display of a static image would cause that image to appear to “burn” into the screen. What was actually taking place then was the phosphors that coated the back of the TV screen would glow for extended periods of time without any rest, causing the phosphors to wear out and create the appearance of a burned-in image. We think this should be called “burn out.” But … whatever.

The same issue is at play with OLED TVs because the compounds that light up do degrade over time. If you burn a pixel long and hard enough, you will cause it to dim prematurely and ahead of the rest of the pixels, creating a dark impression. However, in reality, this is not very likely to cause a problem for anyone — you’d have to abuse the TV intentionally in order to achieve this result. Even the “bug” (logo graphic) that certain channels use disappears often enough or is made clear so as to avoid causing burn-in issues. You’d have to watch ESPN all day every day (for many days) at the brightest possible setting to cause a problem, and even then it still isn’t very likely.

That said, the potential is there, and it should be noted. Since QLED TVs aren’t susceptible to burn-in, they win this fight 

Last edited by jakemania - on 26 November 2017

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I have an LG OLED, pushing 2 years old.

It is simply unrivalled by any non-OLED I have ever seen. Game regularly and have had no issues with burn-in.



starcraft - Playing Games = FUN, Talking about Games = SERIOUS

I'm rocking a Panasonic plasma from 2008. The burn in from 4:3 content from loads of netflix streaming is visible when the screen displays all white. That is the only time I notice it though.



Azuren said:
Don't game on OLEDs. The burn in is a real threat to your screen.

I assume that model number is your country's version of the XBR55X900E, in which case I say get that.

Not true, I've been gaming on OLED for the past 6 months, sometimes for 10 hours straight and my television is (so far) doing more than fine.

What you should not do with a self emissive set such as an OLED TV is let a frozen picture on for hours, like pausing a screen and letting it like that for a long time and if there is nothing bright in the picture it shouldn't really be an issue, but out of caution you don't let it on for long. Don't EVER let a bright picture paused for long cause that could imprint on your screen.

So obviously don't use an OLED screen as a computer monitor cause those tend to stay on the same image for very long, like the toolbar at the top of some programs stays on sometimes for the entire time your computer is on. (Without moving cause if the toolbars moved even a little it would not be a problem but they don't move and stay exactly to the pixel at the same place)

But as a TV to game and watch movies and shows, it's perfect. Careful if using Twitch on it though, as some streamers don't go full screen and you often got the left or right part of the screen with a space for chat and that space does not move at all and if you do that for many hours at a time, well, I don't advise it.



Guitarguy said:

Hey guys, I'm in a slight dilemma here. I can get a 4K HDR Bravia LED(Sony KD55X9000E 55") right now for really cheap. OLED TV sets are still very expensive and I'm currently playing on a full HD Bravia at the moment which is good but the tech is old now. I do want a big jump going from my 1080P Bravia 55", is 4K OLED worth waiting for over standard 4K LED? Is it night and day difference between 4K LED and 4K OLED?

Just so you know, if you're talking about the display technology then you should do the same for both systems just for the sake of being coherent.

What you call a LED TV is actually an LCD TV, the LEDs are part of the background light. OLED TV's displays are made of organic LED's but so called LED TV's displays are made of LCD's. It's marketing that is at fault here, they try to confuse the masses cause LED and OLED sounds so close that people with LCD's displays feel like they pretty much got the same as OLED, but it has NOTHING to do one with the other.



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CrazyGamer2017 said:
Azuren said:
Don't game on OLEDs. The burn in is a real threat to your screen.

I assume that model number is your country's version of the XBR55X900E, in which case I say get that.

Not true, I've been gaming on OLED for the past 6 months, sometimes for 10 hours straight and my television is (so far) doing more than fine.

What you should not do with a self emissive set such as an OLED TV is let a frozen picture on for hours, like pausing a screen and letting it like that for a long time and if there is nothing bright in the picture it shouldn't really be an issue, but out of caution you don't let it on for long. Don't EVER let a bright picture paused for long cause that could imprint on your screen.

So obviously don't use an OLED screen as a computer monitor cause those tend to stay on the same image for very long, like the toolbar at the top of some programs stays on sometimes for the entire time your computer is on. (Without moving cause if the toolbars moved even a little it would not be a problem but they don't move and stay exactly to the pixel at the same place)

But as a TV to game and watch movies and shows, it's perfect. Careful if using Twitch on it though, as some streamers don't go full screen and you often got the left or right part of the screen with a space for chat and that space does not move at all and if you do that for many hours at a time, well, I don't advise it.

My LG also defaults to a screensaver that is mostly black with a logo that jumps around the screen - ensuring no burn in from long-frozen images.



starcraft - Playing Games = FUN, Talking about Games = SERIOUS

the 55 inch oled is only priced slightly higher then 55x900. choice is easy.. 65inch is different story.



CrazyGamer2017 said:
Guitarguy said:

Hey guys, I'm in a slight dilemma here. I can get a 4K HDR Bravia LED(Sony KD55X9000E 55") right now for really cheap. OLED TV sets are still very expensive and I'm currently playing on a full HD Bravia at the moment which is good but the tech is old now. I do want a big jump going from my 1080P Bravia 55", is 4K OLED worth waiting for over standard 4K LED? Is it night and day difference between 4K LED and 4K OLED?

Just so you know, if you're talking about the display technology then you should do the same for both systems just for the sake of being coherent.

What you call a LED TV is actually an LCD TV, the LEDs are part of the background light. OLED TV's displays are made of organic LED's but so called LED TV's displays are made of LCD's. It's marketing that is at fault here, they try to confuse the masses cause LED and OLED sounds so close that people with LCD's displays feel like they pretty much got the same as OLED, but it has NOTHING to do one with the other.

I never once seen someone, online or irl, mistake a LED TV for an OLED TV. 

There was absolutely nothing that lacked coherence in his post. You are being obtuse for no reason.

Last edited by Hynad - on 27 November 2017


Hynad said:

I never once seen someone, online or irl, mistake a LED TV for an OLED TV. 

There was absolutely nothing that lacked coherence in his post. You are being obtuse for no reason.

Well the fact that people compare the actual display (OLED) with the back light of a display (LED) shows they don't know what they are talking about.

It's as if I said, check out the wheels on this car so much better compared to the engine on that other car.

Makes no sense and only people who have no idea what car parts are about would say that. I just don't blame the masses in this instance cause marketing is made to confuse as much as possible here.

As for you if you still see "absolutely nothing that lacks coherence" then you are the obtuse one.



OLED still suffers from burn-in and the life of the panel still is shorter. For smartphones these two things are not that relevant because the battery gives away way earlier and nobody keeps their phones for a lot of time.

Gaming is not good for OLEDs. If you play the same game frequently (let's say, an RPG like Skyrim or an online game that hooks you up), you could end up with the HUD burned in your screen.

But TVs are expected to last a few years. So, until they solve the shortcomings of OLED, it's LCD all the way. OLED is a superior tech, the image quality is indeed better. But it won't look better anymore when you have a minimap and a health bar burned in your panel.