Forums - Gaming Discussion - Bioware on how to milk gamers' pockets: day-one DLC, online passes, microtransactions

 

BioWare on how to monetise players: day-one DLC, Online Passes, micro-transactions

"Gamers are happier, as they are able to spend money when they want".

BioWare has discussed its business strategy for providing extra (paid) content to players after a game has been released.

One such method includes day-one DLC, something the Mass Effect studio is convinced gamers can be tempted with.

"Fans do want more content. From the moment the game launches. They tend to say 'I want it now!' So it needs to be there when it's ready," BioWare online development director Fernando Melo explained at GDC Europe today. "They choose when to pick it up, day one or later."

Mass Effect 3 launched alongside the day-one DLC pack From Ashes, which included an extra squadmate and missions. The earlier that players bought the add-on, the more dialogue options and content were available with that squad member, who doled out a hefty chunk of important in-game lore.

Day-one DLC makes business sense, Melo continued, as it meant that writers and concept artists who had finished their jobs on Mass Effect 3 could be put back into work immediately - while their colleagues continued on the main game.

In Melo's eyes, another form of day-one DLC is the Online Pass, although new copies of the game may ship with the content. 11 per cent of all Mass Effect 2 DLC revenue came from the Online Pass, content that had already been planned for as an incentive to new customers.

"An analogue [to the Online Pass] is free-to-play games, or games with a premium layer of service," Melo added, name-checking Call of Duty Elite and Battlefield Premium. An Online Pass could be seen similarly, as an 'out-of-the-box premium service'.

Mass Effect 3 also added micro-transactions to the franchise. The game lets players spend real-life money unlocking multiplayer content such as weapons and character classes, allowing users faster access than by simply using in-game currency.

"If you have five DLC packs at $10 each, you can only ever earn a total of $50," Melo explained. Micro-transactions allow the "potential for more" player spending, and give gamers the ability of extra "choice".

"Gamers are actually happier, as they are able to spend money when they want. People may not want to pay upfront. They may be happier to pay when they are 'in the moment'."

Overall, the packs have been "very successful for us", Melo concluded, adding that their sale has allowed the development of several free multiplayer expansions, which has in turn encouraged more players to the game, who have then spent more money on content packs.

 

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-08-13-bioware-on-how-to-monetise-players-day-one-dlc-online-passes-micro-transactions

 



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melo is a fucking idiot !!!



 

For me it doesn't matter if downloadable content is released on day 1 or day 100, if the game is complete without it (or if the price of the game is adjusted appropriately) and the downloadable content is reasonably priced I don't have a problem with it ...

Unfortunately, most publishers do not see downloadble content in the same way I do; and for them it is mostly about getting people to pay more for the same game.



DLC is a good thing, it keeps the price of games at a stable level and helps with industry sustainability. It is also one of the reasons why publishers were so focused on HD titles when they can earn for instance an average of $60 per HD game and $20-30 for a Wii game in the hand after all other costs. Finally it gives them an opportunity for a second stab at release when a popular game gets a GOTY edition at say $40 with all DLC included.



Tease.

I agree with HappySquirrel. So long as dlc isn't used as an excuse to ship an incomplete game, i have no issue with it.



Monster Hunter: pissing me off since 2010.

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in biowares defense theres just saying what every publisher thinks and a business os formed to make money so there just stating the best ways to achieve a businesses goal.



This is the evil side of DLC... I hate when companies have day-one dlc, because it seems more and more common for developers to ship out incomplete games... Just look at the Street Fighter X Tekken game - the DLC characters were already on the fucking disc!

Also, FUCK online passes... What a crock of shit! I have bought significantly fewer games because of that shit... Some of us hate being nickled and dimed! You sold the game once already, you earned your money, get the fuck over it and quit being greedy!




Gamers have the choice not to pay the extra $10 for DLC that adds little or nothing to the game. $10 for an extra character, a new weapon and one or two hours of additional game play.
A gamer pays $50 or $60 for an incomplete game. Developers withhold content for the game by releasing them in 4 or 5 installment at $10 a pop to add $40 or $50 on top of a $50 or $60 game.



Dark_Lord_2008 said:
Gamers have the choice not to pay the extra $10 for DLC that adds little or nothing to the game. $10 for an extra character, a new weapon and one or two hours of additional game play.
A gamer pays $50 or $60 for an incomplete game. Developers withhold content for the game by releasing them in 4 or 5 installment at $10 a pop to add $40 or $50 on top of a $50 or $60 game.


You get a complete game. The DLC mostly never even has an effect on the game at all. For example the from Ashes DLC was just additional content, the would not be any different if you never would buy it.



I am fine with DLC. I loved the story DLCs from Mass Effect 2 and I will buy the Leviatan DLC for Mass Effect 3.