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Bonus points for me: Is Machina an Awesome mod?

Hell Yes!
Yes
Most assuradely
Other option that is better than these options!!!
I want to have his babies.
Heroes of Ruin looks like a game to definitely keep an eye on

Around the Network
Just been announced... Pokemon Black/White Version 2 coming to North America and Europe in Fall 2012!
http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2012/02/north_america_gets_pokemon_black_and_white_2_this_fall
http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2012/02/pokemon_black_and_white_2_europe_bound_this_autumn



Read my original story on Fictionpress (Shinigami Twin): http://www.fictionpress.com/s/2996503/1/Shinigami-Twin 

As well as my other one (Hell's Punishment): http://www.fictionpress.com/s/3085054/1/Hell-s-Punishment

Nintendo Network ID: kingofe3

UncleScrooge said:
I won't quote Spurgeonryan's post but can anyone recommend Dillon's Rolling Western? I'm totally interested in the game but it's getting rather bad reviews from most media outlets. On the other hand its eShop rating is all the rage (5/5 stars) and users really seem to like it. I'm a lefty btw, which doesn't exactly make the decision easier


Actually there are a lot of decent reviews out there. It is not receiving 9's, but still good scores. You should pick it up. But if you decide not to there are plenty of other fun games on the eshop right now.



Pokemonbrawlvg said:
Just been announced... Pokemon Black/White Version 2 coming to North America and Europe in Fall 2012!
http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2012/02/north_america_gets_pokemon_black_and_white_2_this_fall
http://www.nintendolife.com/news/2012/02/pokemon_black_and_white_2_europe_bound_this_autumn


That is kind of impressive that they are pushing these games out so fast. I know that they cannot put too much time into it because the DS will not be around forever, but still that is fast! I hope they can do a really good job in that amount of time. Anyone know the regular production and development time for an actual pokemon game?



@ryan Anywhere between five months and a year. This is the fastest Pokemon localization ever...

Read my original story on Fictionpress (Shinigami Twin): http://www.fictionpress.com/s/2996503/1/Shinigami-Twin 

As well as my other one (Hell's Punishment): http://www.fictionpress.com/s/3085054/1/Hell-s-Punishment

Nintendo Network ID: kingofe3

Around the Network
spurgeonryan said:
UncleScrooge said:
I won't quote Spurgeonryan's post but can anyone recommend Dillon's Rolling Western? I'm totally interested in the game but it's getting rather bad reviews from most media outlets. On the other hand its eShop rating is all the rage (5/5 stars) and users really seem to like it. I'm a lefty btw, which doesn't exactly make the decision easier


Actually there are a lot of decent reviews out there. It is not receiving 9's, but still good scores. You should pick it up. But if you decide not to there are plenty of other fun games on the eshop right now.


Yeah I think I'll give it a try. Did you play it? I'd really like to hear some opinions from people who played the game for some time. It's got a 6.5 rating on Metacritic I think and I've seen lots of really bad reviews for it. On the other hand user reviews are extremely positive. It just strikes me as odd how much media and user rankings differ and I'm afraid the 5/5 star rating is due to people playing it for 30 minutes, going "yeah the graphics are great" and giving it a 5 stars rating even though apparently it's getting repetitive after some time. As for other games: Pullblox looks cool but what I want right now is some sort of adventure game I can play in small dozes. I'm craving to play Sakura Samurai but it wasn't released in Europe yet and it's not even been mentioned in NoE's release list.



Another Week is gone, and a new week has begun! Welcome to the Nintendo news thread.

 

James Rolfe, more popularly known as the Angry Video Game Nerd, has recently done an interview with VGA on gaming in general. At one part in the interview, Zelda is briefly discussed, where he revealed his favorite Zelda title.

 

VGA: In your opinion, what is the best game in the Legend of Zelda series and what makes it stand out from the rest for you?

JR: My favorite is Link to the Past. It was innovative for its time. The story is great. Loved the music. Everything. Just messing around is fun. Throwing bushes, breaking into people’s homes and destroying all their pottery, tossing chickens, dashing into walls. Good stuff.

To read the rest of the interview, you can click here.

Source: VGA

 

 

Zero Suit Samus Aran from Metroid

Zero Suit Samus Aran from Metroid

 

 

 

News: Wii U Controller Originally Had Proper Analogue Sticks

News: Wii U Controller Originally Had Proper Analogue Sticks

All change

All change

The Wii U controller features 3DS-like Circle Pad sliders instead of the tilting analogue sticks that have been the industry norm since Nintendo 64. That wasn't always the case, though.

An earlier version of the controller than the one we've seen included proper analogue sticks raised from the controller's surface, among other changes, as a NeoGAF comparison between the controller's pre- and post-E3 form shows. There are other changes too, mostly relocations of buttons and the stylus, but they're mostly aesthetic choices.

Nintendo has said the console and its new controller are both still in development, so the final pad we hold in our hands later this year could be totally different; we'll just have to wait and see.

[via http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost.php?p=35468866&postcount=10922" rel="external" href="http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showpost.php?p=35468866&postcount=10922" target="_blank">neoaf.com]

 

 

How Did The Last Story Do When It Launched In The UK Last Week?

As the majority of you will be aware the fantastic The Last Story launched in the UK on Friday. The game managed to reach number fifteen in the UK all-formats charts, which to be honest isn’t too bad. The Last Story made its début at number two in the Wii Charts. The Last Story has already been confirmed for release later this year in North America.

 

 

 

The Dog from the Oscars Also Works for Nintendo

This month is Responsible Pet Owners Month. And to mark it, Nintendo hired Uggie, the Jack Russell terrier from The Artist, as its official spokesdog. This month is also the Academy Awards.

During last night's Oscar presentation, Uggie was on stage as The Artist won the Academy Award for Best Picture. He donned a bowtie and got fed snacks from Jean Dujardin, who won an Oscar for Best Actor.

Besides appearing in The Artist and other motion pictures like Water for Elephants, Uggie is Nintendo's first official spokesdog. The pooch is promoting nintendogs + cats.

And he also starred in the best film of 2011. Sure hope Nintendo raises his salary or increases the number of doggy biscuits it gives him.

 

 

 

 

Well we know what handheld is going to dominate the UK it seems.....

 

UK software sales (Week ending 2/25) February 27th, 2012

Individual formats

- 1 UNCHARTED: GOLDEN ABYSS VITA SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
- 2 FIFA FOOTBALL VITA EA SPORTS ELECTRONIC ARTS
1 3 UFC UNDISPUTED 3 XB360 THQ THQ
- 4 WIPEOUT 2048 VITA SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
2 5 UFC UNDISPUTED 3 PS3 THQ THQ
- 6 RAYMAN ORIGINS VITA UBISOFT UBISOFT
3 7 MARIO & SONIC LONDON 2012 OLYMPIC GAMES WII SEGA SEGA
- 8 SYNDICATE XB360 EA GAMES ELECTRONIC ARTS
6 9 FIFA 12 XB360 EA SPORTS ELECTRONIC ARTS
- 10 THE LAST STORY WII NINTENDO NINTENDO
5 11 BATTLEFIELD 3 XB360 EA GAMES ELECTRONIC ARTS
4 12 CALL OF DUTY: MODERN WARFARE 3 XB360 ACTIVISION ACTIVISION BLIZZARD
13 13 SUPER MARIO 3D LAND 3DS NINTENDO NINTENDO
9 14 JUST DANCE 3 WII UBISOFT UBISOFT
7 15 CALL OF DUTY: MODERN WARFARE 3 PS3 ACTIVISION ACTIVISION BLIZZARD
25 16 UNCHARTED 3: DRAKE’S DECEPTION PS3 SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
24 17 FORZA MOTORSPORT 4 XB360 MICROSOFT MICROSOFT
- 18 THE JAK AND DAXTER TRILOGY PS3 SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
- 19 RIDGE RACER VITA NAMCO BANDAI GAMES NAMCO BANDAI GAMES
16 20 ZUMBA FITNESS WII 505 GAMES 505 GAMES
15 21 FIFA 12 PS3 EA SPORTS ELECTRONIC ARTS
14 22 FINAL FANTASY XIII-2 XB360 SQUARE ENIX SQUARE ENIX EUROPE
8 23 FINAL FANTASY XIII-2 PS3 SQUARE ENIX SQUARE ENIX EUROPE
12 24 MARIO & SONIC LONDON 2012 OLYMPIC GAMES 3DS SEGA SEGA
- 25 VIRTUA TENNIS 4: WORLD TOUR EDITION VITA SEGA SEGA
- 26 EVERYBODY’S GOLF VITA SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
20 27 ZUMBA FITNESS 2 WII 505 GAMES 505 GAMES
17 28 MOSHI MONSTERS: MOSHLING ZOO DS MIND CANDY MIND CANDY
19 29 THE ELDER SCROLLS V: SKYRIM XB360 BETHESDA SOFTWORKS BETHESDA SOFTWORKS
18 30 MARIO KART 7 3DS NINTENDO NINTENDO
- 31 ULTIMATE MARVEL VS. CAPCOM 3 VITA CAPCOM CAPCOM
11 32 BATTLEFIELD 3 PS3 EA GAMES ELECTRONIC ARTS
- 33 LITTLE DEVIANTS VITA SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
10 34 THE DARKNESS II XB360 2K GAMES TAKE 2
23 35 SKYLANDERS: SPYRO’S ADVENTURE WII SKYLANDERS ACTIVISION BLIZZARD
28 36 SAINTS ROW: THE THIRD XB360 THQ THQ
- 37 FALLOUT: NEW VEGAS ULTIMATE EDITION XB360 BETHESDA SOFTWORKS BETHESDA SOFTWORKS
- 38 SYNDICATE PS3 EA GAMES ELECTRONIC ARTS
26 39 METAL GEAR SOLID HD COLLECTION PS3 KONAMI KONAMI
- 40 F1 2011 VITA CODEMASTERS CODEMASTERS

All formats

- 1 UNCHARTED: GOLDEN ABYSS SCEA BEND SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
- 2 FIFA FOOTBALL EA CANADA EA SPORTS ELECTRONIC ARTS
1 3 UFC UNDISPUTED 3 YUKE’S THQ THQ
2 4 FIFA 12 EA CANADA EA SPORTS ELECTRONIC ARTS
36 5 RAYMAN ORIGINS UBISOFT (CASABLANCA) UBISOFT UBISOFT
4 6 MARIO & SONIC LONDON 2012 OLYMPIC GAMES SEGA SEGA SEGA
- 7 SYNDICATE STARBREEZE EA GAMES ELECTRONIC ARTS
3 8 CALL OF DUTY: MODERN WARFARE 3 INFINITY WARD/SLEDGEHAMMER ACTIVISION ACTIVISION BLIZZARD
5 9 BATTLEFIELD 3 DIGITAL ILLUSIONS EA GAMES ELECTRONIC ARTS
6 10 FINAL FANTASY XIII-2 SQUARE ENIX SQUARE ENIX SQUARE ENIX EUROPE
- 11 WIPEOUT 2048 STUDIO LIVERPOOL SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
9 12 THE ELDER SCROLLS V: SKYRIM BETHESDA BETHESDA SOFTWORKS BETHESDA SOFTWORKS
7 13 SKYLANDERS: SPYRO’S ADVENTURE TOYS FOR BOB SKYLANDERS ACTIVISION BLIZZARD
10 14 JUST DANCE 3 UBISOFT (FRANCE) UBISOFT UBISOFT
- 15 THE LAST STORY MISTWALKER/AQ INTERACTIVE NINTENDO NINTENDO
14 16 ZUMBA FITNESS PIPEWORKS 505 GAMES 505 GAMES
- 17 FALLOUT: NEW VEGAS ULTIMATE EDITION OBSIDIAN ENTERTAINMENT BETHESDA SOFTWORKS BETHESDA SOFTWORKS
8 18 THE DARKNESS II DIGITAL EXTREMES 2K GAMES TAKE 2
16 19 RAGE ID SOFTWARE BETHESDA SOFTWORKS BETHESDA SOFTWORKS
17 20 SAINTS ROW: THE THIRD VOLITION THQ THQ
19 21 SUPER MARIO 3D LAND NINTENDO NINTENDO NINTENDO
- 22 F1 2011 SUMO DIGITAL CODEMASTERS CODEMASTERS
13 23 METAL GEAR SOLID HD COLLECTION BLUEPOINT GAMES KONAMI KONAMI
29 24 UNCHARTED 3: DRAKE’S DECEPTION NAUGHTY DOG SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
27 25 FORZA MOTORSPORT 4 TURN 10 STUDIOS MICROSOFT MICROSOFT
12 26 KINGDOMS OF AMALUR: RECKONING 38 STUDIOS EA GAMES ELECTRONIC ARTS
- 27 THE JAK AND DAXTER TRILOGY MASS MEDIA SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
- 28 RIDGE RACER CELLIUS NAMCO BANDAI GAMES NAMCO BANDAI GAMES
22 29 BATMAN: ARKHAM CITY ROCKSTEADY STUDIOS WARNER BROS. INTERACTIVE WARNER BROS. INTERACTIVE
- 30 VIRTUA TENNIS 4: WORLD TOUR EDITION SEGA SEGA SEGA
11 31 ASSASSIN’S CREED: REVELATIONS UBISOFT (MONTREAL) UBISOFT UBISOFT
- 32 EVERYBODY’S GOLF CLAP HANZ SONY COMPUTER ENT. SONY COMPUTER ENT.
- 33 ULTIMATE MARVEL VS. CAPCOM 3 CAPCOM CAPCOM CAPCOM
26 34 ZUMBA FITNESS 2 ZOË MODE 505 GAMES 505 GAMES
- 35 BINARY DOMAIN SEGA SEGA SEGA
15 36 LEGO HARRY POTTER: YEARS 5-7 TRAVELLER’S TALES WARNER BROS. INTERACTIVE WARNER BROS. INTERACTIVE
23 37 MOSHI MONSTERS: MOSHLING ZOO BLACK LANTERN MIND CANDY MIND CANDY
18 38 LEGO PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN TRAVELLER’S TALES DISNEY INTERACTIVE STUDIOS DISNEY INTERACTIVE STUDIOS
20 39 NEED FOR SPEED: THE RUN EA BLACK BOX EA GAMES ELECTRONIC ARTS
24 40 MARIO KART 7 RETRO STUDIOS / NINTENDO NINTENDO NINTENDO

 

 

 

Gearbox Wants As Much Wii U Power As Possible

More power

Gearbox Software's Aliens: Colonial Marines is in the works for Wii U, and president Randy Pitchford has urged Nintendo to make the machine as powerful as it can afford.

Speaking to Nintendo-Gamer, Pitchford said:

Our hope at Gearbox is that the final specification for the hardware is much more powerful than the current competitive consoles so that studios like ours can bring a better standard of high definition image not only to television, but to the controller’s screen at the same time.

Pitchford didn't talk exact specifications, but was insistent on the need for Nintendo to pack the machine with as much graphical horsepower as possible to put Xbox 360 and PS3 in the shade:

We’ve been intrigued by what we’ve seen so far and are encouraging Nintendo to go as aggressively as they can afford with the performance specifications. We imagine that performance specifications are within affordable reach that would provide undeniable performance advantages over competitive platforms. Nintendo have a lot more experience than we do in managing the balance between performance and cost with their hardware, of course, so I do not want to be presumptuous.

Aliens: Colonial Marines is still in the R&D phase, according to Pitchford, so it's not certain when we'll actually get to see Gearbox's shooter running on Wii U, but we certainly hope it'll be soon.

[via http://www.nintendo-gamer.net/2012/02/22/aliens-colonial-marines-wii-u-randy-pitchford-interview" rel="external" href="http://www.nintendo-gamer.net/2012/02/22/aliens-colonial-marines-wii-u-randy-pitchford-interview" target="_blank">nintendo-gamer.net]

 

 

Rumour: Nintendo Courting Comcast for Wii U

Cable may be on the way

According to Adweek, Nintendo is doing the rounds at major media chains including cable company Comcast, hoping to secure their support for Wii U.

The site claims Nintendo executives met with a number of top content companies at last month's Consumer Electronics Show, but sources admit it's very early days so far and that nothing may come of these meetings.

Still, it's encouraging to hear Nintendo preparing to take Wii U down a more wide-ranging media approach, which would back up Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime's assertion that Wii U will boast a full range of entertainment.

[via http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/nintendo-courting-media-partners-new-wii-138387?" rel="external" href="http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/nintendo-courting-media-partners-new-wii-138387?" target="_blank">adweek.com]

 

 

 

Reaction: Nintendo Direct - Nintendo Joins the Modern Age

Bringing the hype

This logo may be seen a lot

This logo may be seen a lot

Yesterday, on the same day that rival Sony launched PlayStation Vita in Europe and North America, Nintendo hosted three online broadcasts designed to reveal and publicise upcoming services and titles. It was the second time Nintendo Direct had taken place, though the timing and execution of this second run showed that the company was stepping it up in terms of marketing, communications and generally building hype.

One criticism levelled at Nintendo in recent years is that it has failed to truly grasp modern networking means of advertising. Nintendo has often, with some justification, relied on the quality of its brands and products to do a lot of the work, while rivals in the gaming industry have been more aggressive in grabbing attention through any means necessary.

We’re not suggesting that Nintendo hasn’t invested heavily in advertising: substantial television campaigns and hands-on events were held for the launch of 3DS, as an example. Conventional tactics of advertising in print publications and on websites have also been common, while the company isn’t shy of sending out regular press releases to websites to encourage internet exposure. Nintendo has always worked hard on advertising, and can boast of recent marketing success stories contributing to phenomenal sales of Wii and DS consoles.

Nintendo Direct, however, represents a welcome modernisation of the company’s efforts to raise awareness and excitement around its products. The timing of the latest broadcasts clashed directly — and intentionally — with Vita’s launch and the presentation by Satoru Iwata, then translated and updated for the European video, contained a well crafted range of details, reveals and teasers.

Nintendo Direct represents a welcome modernisation of the company’s efforts to raise awareness and excitement around its products.

Iwata’s presentation provided greater detail on Kid Icarus: Uprising, a release date and information for Mario Tennis Open, a juicy trailer for Fire Emblem: Kakusei and confirmation of a Europe release in 2012, and an announcement of a new Dr. Kawashima title coming to 3DS. That wasn’t even all of the news that came out on the day, but provides an indication of the fine balance between promoting upcoming titles and teasing others that are further away.

Reggie Fils-Aime once again presented his own broadcast for North America, though after the shiny-chinned appearance last time, this presentation was altogether slicker and more interesting to watch. Although not quite as content-heavy as Iwata’s message, and also a fair bit shorter, this version did focus on news of particular interest in the region: the blockbuster announcement was that The Last Story is on the way. This video also showed a couple of different areas of Nintendo of America’s HQ, with a teasing glimpse of Nintendo Treehouse, home to localisation teams.

Not only were all three Nintendo Direct broadcasts useful and attention-grabbing, but it was interesting to see how big an impact they had online, particular on Twitter. The social networking site was flooded with tweets reacting to every announcement as it came, with quite a few games journalists in particular being distracted from the shiny new handheld that had just hit stores. Nothing gets games writers’ juices flowing like release dates and teasers, so Nintendo Direct was getting plenty of coverage around the 'net.

A personal touch

A personal touch

On the subject of Twitter, this week also saw minor landmarks for Nintendo of Europe and Nintendo UK, both setting up new accounts on the site. It seems incredible to say that these regional sections of the company had no presence on such a major social networking platform until now, but it at least shows that both are willing to battle for gamer’s attentions as they tweet about their days. Not only that, but we saw the first signs of Nintendo making greater use of its own messaging service, with marketing messages due to be sent to 3DS owners through Nintendo Letter Box, or Swapnote as it’s known in North America. The broadcasts themselves were announced through this app, with gamers able to marvel at the slightly scruffy handwriting of Satoru Iwata and Reggie Fils-Aime: a charming personal touch.

We certainly appreciated the appearance of Nintendo Direct here on Nintendo Life, with the news day having the feel of a mini-E3. There’s also the feeling here that Nintendo didn’t use all of its big announcements in one session, with upcoming 3DS releases such as Paper Mario, Luigi’s Mansion 2 and Animal Crossing, not to mention the looming Wii U, totally absent. More Nintendo Direct is undoubtedly on the way, and we can’t wait.

Nintendo will no doubt continue to employ marketing through traditional means, such as TV, print and website advertisements, while we’d expect Wii U to have similar hands-on events to those that took 3DS on the road in 2011. It’s through internet buzz and hype, however, that Nintendo can take these efforts to another level. Whether writing or reading about video games, there’s an undeniable enjoyment in events like Nintendo Direct, serving as a perfect reminder to us all why we love gaming as much as we do.

new Dr. Kawashima title coming to 3DS.

 

 

Tune in later for more news.



UncleScrooge said:
spurgeonryan said:
UncleScrooge said:
I won't quote Spurgeonryan's post but can anyone recommend Dillon's Rolling Western? I'm totally interested in the game but it's getting rather bad reviews from most media outlets. On the other hand its eShop rating is all the rage (5/5 stars) and users really seem to like it. I'm a lefty btw, which doesn't exactly make the decision easier


Actually there are a lot of decent reviews out there. It is not receiving 9's, but still good scores. You should pick it up. But if you decide not to there are plenty of other fun games on the eshop right now.


Yeah I think I'll give it a try. Did you play it? I'd really like to hear some opinions from people who played the game for some time. It's got a 6.5 rating on Metacritic I think and I've seen lots of really bad reviews for it. On the other hand user reviews are extremely positive. It just strikes me as odd how much media and user rankings differ and I'm afraid the 5/5 star rating is due to people playing it for 30 minutes, going "yeah the graphics are great" and giving it a 5 stars rating even though apparently it's getting repetitive after some time. As for other games: Pullblox looks cool but what I want right now is some sort of adventure game I can play in small dozes. I'm craving to play Sakura Samurai but it wasn't released in Europe yet and it's not even been mentioned in NoE's release list.


I have not played it. I would Recommend Mutant Mudds instead then if you guys do not have Sakura SAmurai. We have a few people here who have played Sakura and said it is a very polished and fun game. So hopefully you guys get that soon.



Now for your Afternoon News!

 

 

3DS Celebrates First Birthday in Japan

Thomas Whitehead

Golden pants for everyone

Golden pants for everyone

Our card was delayed in the post

Nintendo probably had a bit of a party yesterday, as its 3DS celebrated being one-year old in Japan. Released on 26th February 2011 to much hype, the handheld has since had an eventful first year, though has been burning up the charts in its homeland in recent months.

It's being reported, meanwhile, that 3DS owners in The Land of the Rising Sun have received a special Satoru Iwata Mii in their StreetPass plaza. The Nintendo boss apparently has all of the puzzle pieces, is level 5 and is wearing some snazzy golden pants to mark the occasion. Whether the rest of the world will receive some SpotPass goodness in late March to celebrate the same landmark, time will tell.

We'll have a lot of content to celebrate one year of 3DS gaming at the end of March. Until then, what have you thought of the 3DS so far, and how would you rate its first year?

 

 

Feature: 3DS Games You'll Probably Never Play

Mark Reece

Cancelled!

The 3DS has endured some trying times in its short lifespan, among these being a number of cancellations of high-profile games by third-party publishers and developers. We've decided to highlight five of the biggest titles to get the chop in the past year, why they were cancelled and the likelihood of these games being resurrected.

The mayhem never arrived

The mayhem never arrived

Saints Row: Drive-By

THQ’s trilogy of Saints Row titles available on the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 represents a certain kind of off-the-wall, preposterous entertainment. You may consider yourself the sort of gamer who’s above such juvenile pursuits as using the contents of a septic tank to bring down property values, or creating a supermodel with a thoroughly masculine voice, but its accessibility and complete disregard for realism serves as a reminder of the insane fun in older Grand Theft Auto titles, before they became more serious.

Saints Row: Drive-By was originally conceived as a companion game to Saints Row: The Third from the HD consoles, and would have also been made available on Xbox Live Arcade and PlayStation Network. This would have been a prequel of sorts that when purchased would provide players with extra goodies, sharing the same relationship with Saints Row: The Third as Fable II: Pub Games did with Fable II, or THQ’s own Red Faction: Battlegrounds shared with Red Faction: Armageddon. Saints Row: Drive-By was also announced as a standalone title for the 3DS, though what form the game would take is still a mystery to this day, as no screenshots or trailers were ever released. Would it depict urban gangland violence through a bird’s eye viewpoint — like Grand Theft Auto: Chinatown Wars — or would it take the more adventurous and ambitious route of giving players a fully realised 3D city to explore?

THQ failed to provide any official explanation as to why they decided to pull the plug on Saints Row: Drive-By. However, if the poor critical and commercial performance of Red Faction: Battlegrounds is any indication, perhaps THQ was wary of wasting more time and resources on a similar project that wouldn’t have succeeded. It’s also no secret that THQ has been enduring some serious financial issues as of late, struggling to support development projects and facing a potential stock market delisting, so it seems extremely unlikely that Saints Row: Drive-By will ever see the light of day.

This gig was cancelled

This gig was cancelled

DJ Hero 3D

Activision is a company that constantly produces yearly updates to its most popular franchises, and with good reason: if a property such as Call of Duty proves itself to be financially successful, it makes perfect sense to give consumers more of what they love. The same could once be said of its Guitar Hero franchise. There was a time when picking up a plastic guitar — in addition to drums or a microphone as the series grew — and pressing different coloured buttons in time to famous rock songs was all the rage, and Activision responded by pumping out more rhythm action games each subsequent year.

The series later expanded to include Band Hero and DJ Hero: the latter saw players partaking in the familiar action of timed button presses, only this time on an extortionately priced controller modelled on a turntable, that also allowed them to mimic scratching and crossfading between songs. When the 3DS was officially revealed at E3 2010, a DJ Hero game was announced in which, predictably, the touch screen would take the place of the turntable controller.

Unfortunately, it transpired that you can have too much of a good thing, to the point that despite the number of Hero instalments released across all formats in both 2009 and 2010 combining to a staggering ten games, enthusiasm and interest in the genre waned. As a result, in February 2011 Activision halted the production of Guitar Hero titles along with all related projects, which included DJ Hero 3D. Of course, it’s possible that once the dust has settled and Activision and its subsidiaries have had the chance to devise a way of revitalising the genre, rhythm action games could make a comeback and DJ Hero 3D may see a release.

The revelation wasn't completely lost

The revelation wasn't completely lost

Assassin's Creed: Lost Legacy

Ubisoft should take notice of the situation in which Activision found itself with the Hero franchise. As much as the series has improved and evolved, Assassin’s Creed — with four HD console titles and the same number of handheld and mobile spin-offs under its belt since its debut in 2007 — is also in danger of having its fans become fatigued and lose interest in its open-world period assassinations. Assassin’s Creed: Lost Legacy was announced for the 3DS and would see Ezio Auditore da Firenze — protagonist from three previous titles in the series — travelling to Masayaf, headquarters of the Secret Order of Hashashin and home of Altaïr ibn-La'Ahad in the late 1100’s.

Other than the basic premise, no concrete information on Lost Legacy was ever revealed, so how closely it would resemble its console counterparts is — and will forever remain — unclear. All we know is that the ideas behind Ezio’s journey to the Middle East actually evolved into what would become Assassin’s Creed: Revelations, and in July 2011 Lost Legacy was officially cancelled. Given the circumstances, a game in the series that utilises that particular plotline is quite obviously not going to happen, yet we shouldn’t rule out the possibility of another Assassin’s Creed spin-off appearing on the 3DS in its lifespan.

A dud explosive

A dud explosive

Bomberman 3DS

Encouraging a few friends to gather together and attempt to blow each other to bits, the Bomberman series' penchant for tactical yet cute ferocity has over the years seen it become as synonymous with multiplayer gaming as the likes of Mario Kart. Bomberman 3DS was set to feature an expansive single player campaign alongside the trademark multiplayer, available locally for four players and supporting online play for up to eight. Hudson Soft had revealed that the title was in development for 3DS before it was released in the West, so this was great news for those of us who were planning to splash the cash on the new handheld.

Unfortunately, in March 2011 Bomberman 3DS was one of a few 3DS titles — including Omega Five and Bonk — in development at Hudson Soft to get the axe, with no explanation as to why it was given the chop. Worse still, in January 2012 it was reported that Konami — now Hudson Soft’s majority shareholder — will be absorbing the house that Bomberman built as of 1st March, so it’s unclear what the Hudson team will be developing in future.

We maybe shouldn’t completely rule out the possibility of the explosion obsessed little tyke making his 3DS debut in the future. For now, however, we can only lament the diminishing influence of one of gaming’s most endearing icons.

Looking back with disappointment

Looking back with disappointment

Mega Man Legends 3

The cancellation of Mega Man Legends 3 was arguably one of the most disappointing pieces of 3DS news to come to light since the handheld was launched, and the ten-year saga is indeed a lengthy tale. Since the release of Mega Man Legends 2 in 2000, series creator Keiji Inafune was repeatedly asked about the existence and/or whereabouts of a potential sequel to the fan-favourite title. In September 2007 he explicitly expressed his desire to develop the highly anticipated game, although he was — for undisclosed reasons — unable to do so.

Fast forward to October 2010 and not only had Capcom answered our prayers and announced that Mega Man Legends 3 would appear exclusively on 3DS, but it was reported that the Japanese publisher/developer would be looking to its fans for help during the development process, pledging a desire for them to have direct input in finalising character design and other aspects of the game.

However, Mega Man Legends 3 started to go downhill in November 2010, when Inafune left Capcom altogether, despite becoming the company’s Global Head of Production just seven months prior. Undeterred by this setback, the team behind the title assured us that development would continue as planned, and that Capcom also planned to release Mega Man Legends 3: Prototype, which would feature ten missions, act as a prologue to the main game and be available when the eShop launched.

The cancellation of Mega Man Legends 3 was arguably one of the most disappointing pieces of 3DS news to come to light since the handheld was launched.

But the hopes and dreams of Mega Man fans the world over came crashing down in July 2011, when it was officially announced that Mega Man Legends 3 had been cancelled, with a company representative stating, “unfortunately it was not felt that the Mega Man Legends 3 Project met certain required criteria,” and that neither the full game nor the equally anticipated Prototype version would be released.

To add insult to injury, mere days after the announcement of its cancellation, Capcom seemed to be blaming the fans for the demise of the game via its Capcom Europe Twitter feed, seemingly citing “lack of fan interest” as the reason. Capcom very quickly apologised for this poorly worded tweet and reiterated the meaning behind these comments, but it’s clear that passing the buck — or at the very least appearing to do so— to the audience who showed nothing but enthusiasm for the project, was perhaps not the best move.

Inafune was also disappointed in the demise of Mega Man Legends 3, as revealed when he publicly stated that he had even gone as far as attempting to work out a contract between Capcom and his own newly founded studio, Comcept, in a bid to get development back on track: a business proposition that Capcom refused.

With Capcom having no current plans to complete the development, and Inafune’s best efforts to resurrect his beloved project being rejected, it would seem that the fate of Mega Man Legends 3 has lamentably been well and truly sealed. The chances of us playing what would surely have been a high-profile 3DS exclusive may have been given the final nail in the coffin.

Arghh! Some of those titles hurt.

 

 

Nintendo Power’s most-wanted games – March 2012

February 27th, 2012

Wii

1. Xenoblade Chronicles
2. The Amazing Spider-Man
3. Men in Black
4. MLB 2K12
5. Karaoke Joysound

Wii U

1. Batman: Arkham City
2. LEGO City Stories
3. Ninja Gaiden III: Razor’s Edge
4. Tekken
5. Darksiders II

3DS

1. Paper Mario
2. Luigi’s Mansion 2
3. Kid Icarus: Uprising
4. Animal Crossing
5. Kingdom Hearts 3D: Dream Drop Distance

 

 

 

PokéPark 2: Wonders Beyond (North America)

Josh Max -  

7/10

Nintendo's newest game has something for every Poke-enthusiast. 

PokéPark 2: Wonders Beyond is the follow up to the original PokéPark, but with a complete overhaul on almost everything. The game now has a lengthy single-player mode, significantly less attractions, and an interchangeable team.

See how psyched everyone is? It's like this ALL THE TIME.

The single-player mode is fun. The story is a simple one: there is a dark world full of cakes and dark Pokémon. The world is referred to as Wish Park. Pokémon from Wish Park are abducting Pokémon from the regular world and controlling their minds with evil cakes. It’s up to Pikachu, Oshawott, Snivy and Tepig to save the day and defeat the Master of Wish Park. There are a fair amount of areas to explore, though the story isn’t very captivating. It’s enough to keep some players interested, but nothing to gush over.


We're not in PokéPark anymore, Piplup.

While adventuring in single-player mode, Pikachu and his buddies can befriend Pokémon from all five generations. When you befriend a Pokémon, you are able to continue to interact with them and gain berries, the game’s currency, or unlock other side quests that will allow you to befriend even more Pokémon. Aside from adding your new friends to your list of friends, (which serves a faux Pokédex), the more friends you have the easier it becomes to enter Wish Park. Every Pokémon in the game looks nice and clean, and they even sound cartoony as they each scream their own names while you pass them.


Unless you're, you know, looking at yourself in the water.

There are various ways to befriend Pokémon in the game, including playing a game of Chase (essentially tag), completing a fetch quest, and battling other Pokémon. The battles are the only part of the game that are interesting. You have three distinct moves to use on opponents, with type advantages still in effect. At first the battles are easy (Iron Tail will destroy everything), but as the game progresses the battles increase in numbers and difficulty, but that’s not a bad thing.

Attractions, which are essentially mini-games, are few and far between. This, also, in not a bad thing, as mini-games are fun to do every once in a while, but usually aren’t engaging enough to be the focus of the game. The first mini-game players encounter is a cake-making game. Players use the Wii Remote in a light gun fashion, shooting ingredients in mid-air. These games can be played with up to four players in multiplayer mode. They’re fun, but much like the story, nothing to get excited over.

The game runs fairly smooth, overall. The battles are fun and easy to pick up on. It’s easy to navigate areas, and nothing is really overwhelming. The only thing that appears weird is, well, moving around. The Pokémon you control either walk slower than a Slowpoke or sprint so fast you can’t turn properly. It’s just weird.

Overall, the game looks nice, but there’s nothing truly beautiful about it. The gameplay and story are solid, but nothing really stands out. The battles are actually really fun, and players can get more of them by running through the rest of the story. While looking at the cleaned-up Pokémon is nice, not being able to use them after defeating them just feels weird after playing Pokémon for so long. What else can I say? The game feels like most parks I’ve been to: It’s nice and everything, but I don’t see any reason to come back too often.

 

Summary

Pros
  • Battles are fun and plentiful
  • Lots of Pokémon to meet and challenge
  • Single-player mode is expansive.
  • You can kind of catch them all?
Cons
  • I don't wanna play Chase with you, Wingull. Leave me alone.
  • The story isn't great
  • Walking is weird

 

 

 
Ten Ways to Make the Next Pokémon Games the Very Best, Like No One Ever Was

With Pokémon Black 2 and White 2 on the way, commenter Daemon_Gildas has submitted a timely list of suggestions for freshening up a franchise that hasn't changed all that much in the past 16 years.

Dear Nintendo and/or Game Freak,

I'm going to give you a list that would make the Pokémon series kick SO MUCH ASS, and all because I just want to really love Pokémon again.

1. Let us customize out characters, at least to an extent. I'm fine with you guys sticking with sprites instead of 3D models, but give us some degree of customization. Different hats and hairstyles, clothes, skin color, eye color, and maybe even a few facial-hair options (nothing burly, just something a 17-year-old or younger might grow). Just make sure we can alter the appearance later, and maybe include a nice "Default" option for those who prefer the old experience.

2. Remove that God-forsaken EV and IV systems. EV'ing was a horrendous system to begin with, but when coupled with IV's, they just completely ruined the game for the casual player. In the late 90's, that was the beauty of Pokémon; anybody could feel competitive, if they played smart. Now, you just have to do ridiculous grinds, cheat, or don't even bother. It feels less like a game and more like work — something I just can't support.

3. Quit adding new Pokémon. Seriously, just stop it for right now. Focus on either giving each Pokémon a fully-3D model, or just adding a lot more frames of animation for each one. If you can handle that for all 450-ish Pokémon, great. If not, just do the first 151 — I'm sure a lot of players would give an "Anniversary Edition" a shot!

4. Remove Breeding. I'm sure this would be a controversial change, but it really has had a negative impact on the Trading community. "Legendary" Pokémon have become the only ones of any significant value, and being able to just breed Pokémon A) just seems really weird anyways, and B) robs you of that thrill of the hunt.

5. After beating the game, let us make our own Custom Gyms! Let us have X amount of Gym Trainers for our Gym, allowing us to equip them with any Pokémon we possess, and give us a variety of Themes, and let us lay down different types of blocks. It may sound like a strange feature to request, but I guarantee it would take off. At the least, let us customize our house (or perhaps import it from Animal Crossing somehow?)

6. Keep the Story to a minimum. Mewtwo was really cool because he broke out of a lab, and was like a "secret character". Some of the later games, though, just feel... well, stupid. Arceus is a Pokémon that apparently created the universe? Other Pokémon can control Time and Space, and even save the planet when the sun goes out? Just keep it simple and a little more believable. Pokémon's strong suit was always in that, as a kid, you felt like you could really go out into the woods and maybe see a Pokémon — the more extraordinary you get, the less "magic" it has.

7. Rather than any Pokémon being trapped in the pokeball you threw at it (which I'll admit, does make sense), why not also give us the option to use a single, custom Pokémon? Give us a variety of stickers and such to customize it, or even just use the appearance of those ones we really like (such as the surprisingly-memorable Master Ball).

8. Add some kind of Co-Op element. Even if you're not able to traverse the entire world together, I'm sure there could be some cool ideas. Perhaps a "Dungeon" that only allows you to use pre-set Pokémon, and requires both of you to work as a team. You can split up to solve puzzles, but the moment one of you enters combat, you're both thrust into the same battle. Whether it's for a special Badge, super-rare Pokémon, or even just for fun, I'm sure it would be a blast!

9. Give us a true reward for hitting those "Caught 'em All" benchmarks. For example, if you catch all 150 from the original games, only then should we be able to catch our own Mew. Continue doing Events, if you must, but allow us to catch our own truly rare Pokémon, don't just hand them to us at some arbitrary time or location.

10. Don't tell us who we are. The more back-story you add to our character, the more bogged-down it feels. Just say we're students of some kind who were relocated to aid our game's Professor with some research. Let us develop our Rival naturally, like in the Silver/Gold games. Similarly, rather than purchasing a "Red" or "Blue" version, why not tie the Pokémon that appear to who your starter Pokémon is?

About Speak Up on Kotaku: Our readers have a lot to say, and sometimes what they have to say has nothing to do with the stories we run. That's why we have a forum on Kotaku called Speak Up. That's the place to post anecdotes, photos, game tips and hints, and anything you want to share with Kotaku at large. Every weekday we'll pull one of the best Speak Up posts we can find and highlight it here.

 

Why Strider for the NES was My Favorite Strider

Friday, February 24, 2012, 7:36 PM [General]

 

Ah, Strider for the NES. I’ve been raving about this under-appreciated globule of entertainment for literally multiple eons, as well as on our latest podcast (discuss the 'cast here). Despite the popular opinion that this is the weakest game in the series’ short run, NES Strider is my favorite Strider of all, and yeah, I’ll just come out and admit that it’s one of my favorite games ever.

I will grant that part of that passion is unquestionably due to nostalgia, but after going back to this game again recently, I can confirm that Strider NES is indeed packed with genuinely interesting ideas, and certainly the most complex Strider game if not the “best.”

 

At the very least, I think we can all agree it trumps the LCD version of the NES game.

As you may know, the NES version of Strider was vastly different from both its arcade and Sega Genesis counterparts, which were themselves rather straightforward, quarter-guzzling action games. And to clarify, I’m certainly not here to knock those games, especially since you can now buy the Genesis version on the Virtual Console, but also because it’s hard to really knock a game in which a cavalcade of senators leap together to form an enormous human centipede, or, if you will, SENATE-PEDE.

I’m certainly not here to knock that.

I’d just like to assert that, should you have the means, it’s definitely worth giving the NES game a chance. The NES game adhered closely to the simultaneously-released Strider manga, providing a story that was relatively deep for its time, with twists, turns, betrayal, and even “Episode”-introducing splash screens as if it were a weird precursor to Asura’s Wrath.

With the advantage of being a home console game that players could enjoy over an extended period at their own leisure, Strider NES took the slower-paced form of an action-adventure, complete with a password system and even some attractively light elements of nonlinearity.

The game starts out with a rather amazing theme song that sounds like it's being performed by an orchestra of motorcycles. It leads into a cutscene that has approximately a 7:4 ratio of cool things to sentences, a proportion we long for in today's explicative dialogue-heavy climate.

 

Then you get into the thick of it. As your boss briefs you on the enormous communications terminal that is suspiciously reminiscent of the enormous communications terminal from Bionic Commando as well as the enormous stage select terminal from Duck Tales, you learn that Kain, who has only just been introduced a minute ago, has been kidnapped and must therefore be found and killed. Phew, tough crowd.


It is here that you discover the game wears a mask of nonlinearity. From the giant terminal, you are able to choose your destination from a number of nations around the world. Granted, there’s only one destination at any given time that’s worth visiting, but the sheer fact that you are able to select of your own volition somehow makes it feel a lot more like you’re a guy in an actual world, making conscious decisions and business trips and such. Most NES games just pushed you around like controlling significant others. At least this game operated off consent.


To start, you must travel to the bleak, futuristic dystopia of Kazakhstan, a level obviously designed with an abundance of reference material at the creators' disposal. In a world where data is still being stored on tablecloth-sized Apple IIE floppy disks (more on that to come), why is it that Kazakhstan has things like flying robot men, transformers, and police stations with magnetic walls? I believe the go-to video game explanation of “‘Cuz it’s rad” applies here fully.

Is this still. . . Kazakhstan??


So but anyway, you find yourself in Kazakh, and it's lightninging out like crazy. No rain--only lightning, which is to signify that a storm's a-brewin'. Foreshadowing and symbolism in a NES game? Why yes, you were wrong to scoff at this post.

The Kazakh stage teaches you a number of cool things about this game:

1. Much of the world of Strider can be traversed via a complex system of criss-crossing pneumatic tubes which allow protagonist Hiryu to zip around at high speeds, taking right-angle turns without even slowing down.

2. If you are skilled, you can perform the Strider’s patented “triangle jump,” bouncing vertically from wall to wall indefinitely.

3. Unlike any other Strider game, in this one you can level up, gain new skills permanently, and even use exhaustible ninja magic. Though Hiryu begins his adventure as a humble, run-of-the-mill future-ninja capable of little beyond swinging a sword and bouncing off walls, he gradually evolves into someone capable of walking on water, generating flames from the fingertips, and shattering the oppressive powers that be.

Your reward for traversing the perilous streets and corrupt law enforcement system of Kazakh is a new slide move, a level up, and two of the aforementioned floppy disks. These disks can be analyzed back on your two-headed space dragon ship for clues as to where you need to go next. It seems that our hero is something of a detective, on top of being a space ninja.

And so progresses the surprisingly deep and intriguing adventure that is Strider for the NES. Certainly not a flawless game, it is nevertheless an under-appreciated one. NES Strider belongs up in the heighty realm of Still Playable Games shared by such titles as Bionic Commando and Mega Man, not at the bottom of some cruddy gutter where all people have to say about it are remarks like "Come on, Capcom, where's the giant centipede made of men?" and "Poo-haw! This version doesn't even have nigh-undodgeable volleys of flashing balls!"

It does, however, have uterus-shaped, mind-controlling trees of death.

P.S. Oh yeah! You can also find this game on the Capcom Classics Mini Mix for the Gameboy Advance, which, as it happens, also contains Bionic Commando. Do it.

 

http://www.halolz.com/2012/02/11/flagpole-rage/

Check it out

 

Dillon's Rolling Western review

 


Is Dillon's Rolling Western worth £9?

Here you go Uncle Scrooge

Dillon's Rolling Western review Why is everyone talking about Dillon's Rolling Western? Certainly not because it stars a silent Armadillo who is Nintendo's coolest new hero since Olimar, nor because it's a game that puts the fun back into tower defence, but because it costs nine quid.

Still, that's less than you'd pay for a cinema ticket in London and when you consider that it costs only £1.80 more than hidden object horror show Halloween: Trick Or Treat, Dillon's Rolling Western almost seems like a bargain. Almost...

So how much game do you get for your £9? Well, there are 10 villages to defend from a bunch of walking rocks called grocks but it is difficult to say how long that will take as it really depends on how good you are at tower defence games.

Dillon's Rolling Western is challenging and it never holds you by the hand. You're never told whether you should build iron or wooden towers or which ones to equip with shotguns, Gatling guns or cannons. Instead, you're ordered to collect scruffles from the fields to feed the scrogs, the creatures who live in the village. If the grocks invade the village and eat all the scrogs, it's game over so it's important to collect scruffles to increase the population of scrogs. Keeping up?

Grock N Roll
So in the day, you have to roll around the field collecting scruffles for the scrogs to eat as well as entering the mines to grab ore which can be used to build iron gates. You'll also need to use this time to build your towers and equip weapons. Rolling is simple with the stylus while you can control Dillon's direction with the Circle Pad.

Then in the evening, the grocks come out for their dinner and it's up to Dillon to prevent them from breaking into the village.

Some of them will be shot down by your carefully positioned gun towers and you can use dynamite to knock down towers which create barriers, but for the most part you'll have to roll into the grocks for battle to commence.

To defeat them, you pull back with the stylus to charge up your roll and then let go to smash into them. Upon impact, you can keep the stylus held down to grind into them or tap the screen to start a combo. It's hard work but so satisfying when you defeat all the grocks in the field over the course of three days and save the village.

The key to victory is to avoid distractions but that's a hard thing to do. It's so easy to be tempted away from scruffle hunting and mining when a gold grock turns up during the day. Racing to catch him for his gold could mean you don't have enough time to collect enough ore for the gates, making you vulnerable at night.

Or you might spot a special type of grock in the distance whose debris you need to complete one of the three side-quests on each mission. Chasing him could leave your village exposed but rushing back to catch a grock before he breaks through the gates is genuinely thrilling.

Dillon's Rolling Western does that thing that Intelligent Systems did with Advance Wars. Developer Vanpool has taken the potentially dull genre of tower defence and packed it with enough charm and character to make it accessible to all.

Admittedly you're pretty much doing the same thing for hours on end but there are far worse things to do than roll around the wild west as an armadillo, and you'll be too busy worrying about gun tower placement to even consider that it might be getting repetitive.

Of course it would have been nice to have a multiplayer mode but you'd probably have to pay even more for that. As it is, Dillon's Rolling Western is great fun and it's hard to think of another game quite like it. It's clearly not as good value as the amazing Pullblox but Dillon is definitely worth it.

 
  Dillon's Rolling Western is expensive but this tower defence game is also one of the best 3D games available in the eShop.   87%


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Araknie said:
I want that Sakura Samurai in europe! O_O

I'll trade you for Wario Land!