Forums - Microsoft Discussion - Project xCloud - Microsoft Game Streaming

Azzanation said:
I bet all those gamers who hated on the Power of the Cloud might be eating there hats now.

why though? most people that were not keen on the cloud want physical copies of their games. Going all service based is you loosing what you own.

Also the power of the cloud was stupid because lets say I bought a game and it relied on the cloud to made the game function, what would happen to my game once the cloud service is turned of for that console? Would it even load or the hardware bet to poor to run it on it's own lol? That was the issue with that scenario.



 

 

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Azzanation said:
I bet all those gamers who hated on the Power of the Cloud might be eating there hats now.

 

No, not really. At the time, Microsoft's claim was that the "Power of the Cloud" was going to improve the Xbox One's graphics performance by offloading graphics processing to the cloud to augment the Xbox's GPU, in real time.  That claim was and still is total and complete bulls#!t - a smoke and mirrors marketing ploy to try to convince the buying public that the Xbox really wasn't weaker, graphics horsepower wise, to the PS4.

What they are pitching now is similar to PSNow and Google's ProjectStream; a game streaming service that does all the processing in the cloud and just displays the pre-rendered graphics to your screen.



CuCabeludo said:
JRPGfan said:

The low end, the casuals....

People that want 4k and the sharpest image quality, and their games to look and play the best (input lag ect) will all still buy physical hardware.
Same with people that have data caps or not the fastest internet... or who live too far from a server farm, makeing the experiance not so great.

You talk as if 20 years from now internet speeds will be stuck at the same rates as today. In the next 10-20 years the leap in speeds will be huge, just like the leap we saw from 1998-2018 period. This is not something that will happen overnight, but it will certainly grow and solidify in the next 2 decades.

In the cities this is likely. Outside of them is another story. I live 15 minutes from a town of 25,000 who've had cable internet that has constantly been upgraded over the years, and around 4 years ago we just got the ability to sign up for 5.0 mbps DSL. That lasted about 6 months before the speed started dropping as more and more signed on. After a couple years we were only getting around 2 mbps on average, 1 mbps during peak. It took almost 2 years to get the problem 'solved'. The only reason it 'got solved' recently, was because another smaller ISP ran fiber through the general area, and stole enough customers to allow the remaining customers who couldn't get fiber, to be able to get their full 5 mbps speed at all times. Ping went from 250ms-500ms, down to 15ms-75ms as well. The local technician, who likes to game, and doesn't even live that far away, relies on satellite because he can only get dial up still for a hard line.

I also made a point to go to the local meeting for that ISP and ask when and if they had any plans to bring fiber this way, since nobody else is going to, and they told me I'd better just move because everyone outside of dense enough towns is getting left behind. They made sure to point out that wasn't just them talking, that's the industry. Their actually part of a larger group that's planning to use Gov funding to lay fiber over a massive area for 3 million people, and they said not only are the people in charge clueless, but the big telecom companies are making it extra hard and slowing the process as much as possible so they don't have to compete on prices since they will no longer own the lines themselves. Those oh so useful slow DSL or dial up lines...

The cities are probably the larger portion of the existing gaming market, but dedicated hardware is going to have to stay around for a long time or gaming companies are going to lose and upset those less dense, non urban dwelling customers. Plus emerging markets would all be lost since they won't have strong enough internet yet either.



And here we go again with the "Games as a surface!!" mentality. I still say it's gonna backfire for everyone.



Replicant said:

That was 5 years ago when Microsoft didn't deliver.

Maybe they'll deliver this time around.

And many didn't believe the logic behind it all. 

Cobretti2 said:

why though? most people that were not keen on the cloud want physical copies of their games. Going all service based is you loosing what you own.

Also the power of the cloud was stupid because lets say I bought a game and it relied on the cloud to made the game function, what would happen to my game once the cloud service is turned of for that console? Would it even load or the hardware bet to poor to run it on it's own lol? That was the issue with that scenario.

You mean just like what if your electricity blacks out or your internet drops out with MMOs on any online video game, or your TV breaks down. Lets not pretend that you are completely covered because you own the physical game. If you cannot download that day one patch your physical game is rendered useless. The industry owns more control over your physical media than you think. 

I have a few games I own the actual disks for and they have been taken down and are no longer available. The disks are useless.

ratchet426 said:

No, not really. At the time, Microsoft's claim was that the "Power of the Cloud" was going to improve the Xbox One's graphics performance by offloading graphics processing to the cloud to augment the Xbox's GPU, in real time.  That claim was and still is total and complete bulls#!t - a smoke and mirrors marketing ploy to try to convince the buying public that the Xbox really wasn't weaker, graphics horsepower wise, to the PS4.

What they are pitching now is similar to PSNow and Google's ProjectStream; a game streaming service that does all the processing in the cloud and just displays the pre-rendered graphics to your screen.

So you mean just like what Nintendo is doing with the Cloud with RE7 etc? Actually increasing performance on the games via streaming? And you still call it BS? Its as simple as it wasn't ready yet, but it existed and they were trying to implement it early. Sometimes these things happens and companies need to postpone there plans. Keep a close eye on Scarlet streaming boxes.



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Azzanation said:

Replicant said:

That was 5 years ago when Microsoft didn't deliver.

Maybe they'll deliver this time around.

And many didn't believe the logic behind it all. 

Cobretti2 said:

why though? most people that were not keen on the cloud want physical copies of their games. Going all service based is you loosing what you own.

Also the power of the cloud was stupid because lets say I bought a game and it relied on the cloud to made the game function, what would happen to my game once the cloud service is turned of for that console? Would it even load or the hardware bet to poor to run it on it's own lol? That was the issue with that scenario.

You mean just like what if your electricity blacks out or your internet drops out with MMOs on any online video game, or your TV breaks down. Lets not pretend that you are completely covered because you own the physical game. If you cannot download that day one patch your physical game is rendered useless. The industry owns more control over your physical media than you think. 

I have a few games I own the actual disks for and they have been taken down and are no longer available. The disks are useless.


I'm talking about turned off indefinitely. a broken TV or power outage is a solvable problem.

That is  exactly why new games don't hold their value and old ones that are classics rise because people rebuy them as they can plug and play.  I personally stay away from games that have game breaking bugs in them. Any game that can be played without a patch and still be somewhat enjoyable is all I buy now. 

Stuff that requires a download to work I ignore completely. 



 

 

jason1637 said:
vivster said:
"The future of gaming is a world where you are empowered to play the games you want, with the people you want, whenever you want, wherever you are, and on any device of your choosing."

Which is why we're currently preparing the 4th iteration of our plastic box that tries its hardest to keep you from doing any of that.

You're missing the "on any device of your choosing " part. They're giving people the choice to be on mobile,  pc and console.

I was talking about releasing another Xbox when apparently the future is not a stationary box.



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