Forums - PC Discussion - Building a PC and need suggestions *UPDATE: Choosen it*

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Hello all.

So, I'm building a PC for the first time, and I know next to nothing about it.

I have two setups in mind, and I don't really know if they make much sense, so if you can help me I would appreciate it.

First, I'm not building it to play games that will be releasing on next gen, and not even for AAA from this gen (that will keep on consoles, gaming on this PC will be either indies or emulation mostly, even if I can try GTA 5 or some stuff like that eventually).

Second, even as I'm not building it to game, I want it to be good enough for all uses for the next five years, as I'm building it to study computer engineering, consider programs you think I'll be using for that if you have any knowledge about it.

So here are the two builds I did.

1. Cheaper

(It's already almost in the limit of what I still feel confortable paying, even if it is really cheap for you xP)

Motherboard: ASUS Prime B450M Gaming

CPU: Ryzen 5 1600 AF

GPU: RX 580

RAM: 1x or 2x 8GB DDR4 2666MHz (dunno which brand)

HDD: Seagate Barracuda 1TB

SSD: Kingston A400 120GB or 240GB

Power Suppy: 500W

2. Expensive

(to me, yeah, I consider that build already quite expensive based on prices here, I can go for it but nothing more)

Motherboard: ASUS Prime B450M Gaming

CPU: Ryzen 5 3600

GPU: GTX 1660 Super

RAM: 2x 8GB DDR4 3000MHz or 1x 16GB 3000 MHz (dunno which brand)

HDD: Seagate Barracuda 2TB

SSD: Adata XPG Gammix S11 Pro 240GB

Power Supply: 550W

I also dunno which kind of cabinet to get based on how many fans and ventilation I may need for those builds.

Those builds can vary about $300 between 1 and 2, for some comparision on what is their difference to me.

Please feel free to give me suggestions, specially if you looked at those and said "WTF are you thinking??".

Thank you.

*Update: I've choosen it.

I bought: 

GPU: Asus TUF3 GTX 1660 Super 6GB

RAM: 2x Adata XPG D41 8GB 3000MHz

HDD: Western Digital Purple SATA 2TB

SSD: XPG Gammix S11 Pro 240GB

Power Supply: EVGA 80 Plus Bronze 600W (was cheaper than 550W today xP)

Will get the motherboard (Asus Prime B450M Gaming) and the CPU (Ryzen 5 3600) later this month or earlier next month.

Thank you all for your help.

Last edited by BraLoD - on 11 March 2020

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BraLoD said:

1. Cheaper

(It's already almost in the limit of what I still feel confortable paying, even if it is really cheap for you xP)

Motherboard: ASUS Prime B450M Gaming

CPU: Ryzen 5 1600 AF

GPU: RTX 580 (Do you mean RX 580?)

RAM: 1x or 2x 8GB DDR4 2666MHz (dunno which brand) (Definitely go with 2x 8GB sticks so they can run in Dual Channel)

HDD: Samsung Barracuda 1TB (Do you mean Seagate Barracuda?)

SSD: Kingston A400 120GB or 240GB (Go with the 240 GB)

Power Suppy: 500W (Use Seasonic brand)

Added comments in BOLD.  Some are just asking for clarification.  This is definitely the better build for your intended use.



Massimus - "Trump already has democrat support."

What's max budget?



SpokenTruth said:
BraLoD said:

1. Cheaper

(It's already almost in the limit of what I still feel confortable paying, even if it is really cheap for you xP)

Motherboard: ASUS Prime B450M Gaming

CPU: Ryzen 5 1600 AF

GPU: RTX 580 (Do you mean RX 580?)

RAM: 1x or 2x 8GB DDR4 2666MHz (dunno which brand) (Definitely go with 2x 8GB sticks so they can run in Dual Channel)

HDD: Samsung Barracuda 1TB (Do you mean Seagate Barracuda?)

SSD: Kingston A400 120GB or 240GB (Go with the 240 GB)

Power Suppy: 500W (Use Seasonic brand)

Added comments in BOLD.  Some are just asking for clarification.  This is definitely the better build for your intended use.

Yes for your questions.

Do you think the cheaper one is worth it then?

Maybe mixing some of the build 2 into it?

For example if I go for the 240GB SSD I'll likely want the nvme counterpart for future proofing xP

Last edited by BraLoD - on 10 March 2020

Random_Matt said:
What's max budget?

It's hard to say, because nothing here costs what it costs in US dollars.

I would say the build 2 is already more than I would like to pay, even as I can still go for it.

More than that even if its worth the price I just won't want to pay for at all.

So hm... the build 2 cost is the very max, how much it costs there.



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BraLoD said:
SpokenTruth said:

Added comments in BOLD.  Some are just asking for clarification.  This is definitely the better build for your intended use.

Yes for your questions.

Do you think the cheaper one is worth it then?

Definitely.  You can do solid gaming with that setup at 1080p with most settings still on high or maxed.  And I can't imagine many computer engineering applications that will stress that system higher than gaming would.

Will you be using any rendering or CAD design applications?  If so, up the RAM to 2x 16GB.  Maybe even 4x 16GB. You can always start with the 2 sticks and add the other 2 later if your applications each up too much RAM.  If you won't be using those kind of applications, keep the 2x 8GB.



Massimus - "Trump already has democrat support."

If gaming is secondary (or even less), but you still want a powerful enough PC so that it lasts as much as possible, you need to go with the newer and more powerful processor (I'm not going to say that it's twice as fast, but the 3600 is cleary superior to the first gen Ryzen).

Based on your two setups, I'd go with:

  • Motherboard: ASUS Prime B450M Gaming - It's more than enough
  • CPU: Ryzen 5 3600 - It's worth the price difference. Alternatively, you could look for deals on the 8 core processors from the Ryzen 2xxx series
  • GPU: RX 580 8GB - Don't buy the 4GB variants
  • RAM: 2x 8GB DDR4 - Always get them in pairs as they'll work better. ALso, Ryzen performs better with faster RAM. If you can find a 3000MHz or 3200MHz unit in your price range, go for them.
  • HDD: Forget Seagate, their HDD are more prone to fail than the rest (Backblaze publishes quaterly reports and they always fail the most). Go with Western Digital (HGST).
  • SSD: Brand isn't really important, but capacity is. I have a 240GB unit and, despite having the games on a separate drive, it's almost full. If you have to install extra software for your studies, you'll face that problem a lot sooner. Go with at least 500GB, of whatever brand.
  • Power Suppy: 450-500W And don't go for the cheapest one because if it fails, it can destroy your whole PC.

Case isn't very important and depends more on a personal taste. Just make sure it has one or two fans.

Last edited by JEMC - on 10 March 2020

Please excuse my bad English.

Currently gaming on a PC with an i5-4670k@stock (for now), 16Gb RAM 1600 MHz and a GTX 1070

Steam / Live / NNID : jonxiquet    Add me if you want, but I'm a single player gamer.

SpokenTruth said:
BraLoD said:

Yes for your questions.

Do you think the cheaper one is worth it then?

Definitely.  You can do solid gaming with that setup at 1080p with most settings still on high or maxed.  And I can't imagine many computer engineering applications that will stress that system higher than gaming would.

Will you be using any rendering or CAD design applications?  If so, up the RAM to 2x 16GB.  Maybe even 4x 16GB. You can always start with the 2 sticks and add the other 2 later if your applications each up too much RAM.  If you won't be using those kind of applications, keep the 2x 8GB.

I edited my post you quoted so you know xD

Yeah, I'll probably use CAD.

One of my colleges have a setup similar to that one, with 2x 8GB ram and no SSD (his RX 580 is only 4gb tho).



JEMC said:

If gaming is secondary (or even less), but you still want a powerful enough PC so that it lasts as much as possible, you need to go with the newer and more powerful processor (I'm not going to say that it's twice as fast, but the 3600 is cleary superior to the first gen Ryzen).

Based on your two setups, I'd go with:

Motherboard: ASUS Prime B450M Gaming - It's more than enough

CPU: Ryzen 5 3600 - It's worth the price difference. Alternatively, you could look for deals on the 8 core processors from the Ryzen 2xxx series

GPU: RX 580 8GB - Don't buy the 4GB variants

RAM: 2x 8GB DDR4 - Always get them in pairs as they'll work better. ALso, Ryzen performs better with faster RAM. If you can find a 3000MHz or 3200MHz unit in

                               your price range, go for them.

HDD: Forget Seagate, their HDD are more prone to fail than the rest (Backblaze publishes quaterly reports and they always fail the most). Go with Western Digital (HGST)

SSD: Kingston A400 120GB or 240GB

Power Suppy: 500W

Yeah, Zen 2 feels like a must for any kind of future upgrade...

RX 580 and GTX 1660s have less difference here tho, so saving bucks would be more efficient with Ryzen 1600 and GTX 1660s tho...

Thank you for your help, I'll keep it in mind.



JEMC said:

HDD: Forget Seagate, their HDD are more prone to fail than the rest (Backblaze publishes quaterly reports and they always fail the most). Go with Western Digital (HGST)

This is exceptionally important.  I can't tell you how many Seagates I've had to replace for my clients and I cringe every time I see one in our own servers.

I've sent those Backblaze reports to clients showing them that their exact model has failure rates over 30% and they still keep sending replacement units in.

BraLoD said:
SpokenTruth said:

Definitely.  You can do solid gaming with that setup at 1080p with most settings still on high or maxed.  And I can't imagine many computer engineering applications that will stress that system higher than gaming would.

Will you be using any rendering or CAD design applications?  If so, up the RAM to 2x 16GB.  Maybe even 4x 16GB. You can always start with the 2 sticks and add the other 2 later if your applications each up too much RAM.  If you won't be using those kind of applications, keep the 2x 8GB.

I edited my post you quoted so you know xD

Yeah, I'll probably use CAD.

One of my colleges have a setup similar to that one, with 2x 8GB ram and no SSD (his RX 580 is only 4gb tho).

I'd still bump it to 2x 16GB.  Especially if design complexity is expected to increase over time. But the benefit of RAM is that you can start with the 2x 8GB and if you need more later, you can easily add another 2x 8GB because your motherboard has 4 DIMM slots for memory sticks.



Massimus - "Trump already has democrat support."