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Questions about Sweden

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Jumpin said:
I don't think the majority of educated people are foolish enough to believe in fascism and nationalism. Rather enlightenment and the sciences are what is valued, and history has proven that liberal thoughts make for vastly better societies. It's unfortunate that Europe still has its share of cowardly nationalist bumpkins who still want to be afraid of differences while living in their inbred homogenous villages.

I can't speak for all of Europe, but nationalist sympathizers are actually more common in areas with higher concentrations of immigrants here in Sweden. Because people around those areas get to experience all the issues that follows first-hand, while the people living in "inbred homogenous villages" tend to vote left or pro immigration.

It's easy to dismiss these people as bigots when you don't have to deal with the things that they have to go through daily, yourself. It's also easy to dismiss them as uneducated just because they don't have top-of-the-line professions and can't afford to move into safe, homogenous villages.

With that said, I'm in no way trying to defend m0ney here. He has proved himself to be one of few actual bigots several times over in this thread.



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Puppyroach said:
Nettles said:

Sweden just dropped interest rates again today.From -0.35 to -0.5.
This is complete insanity.They're just about done, everything they are doing is unsustainable.

Gold up USD 50 in the past 12 hours.Some serious shit brewing in the markets.

You are being very dramatic, and it´s competely unnecessary. Negative interest rates aren´t by defintion bad, a government need to be responsible with how they handle the national economy and don´t inflate the currency when the rest of the world is so unstable.

It was expected that they would drop the interest since the stock market globally has been volatile and since the national banks plan is to keep the interest extremely low for atleast a couple of more years.

Very low and especially negative rates are bad, because they create huge asset bubbles.Want proof? - Swedish house prices increased 18% last year.We've already gone through this and i really can't be bothered arguing with someone who can't see how insane current Swedish monetary and economic policy is.You can't understand the most basic concepts.



IIIIITHE1IIIII said:

With that said, I'm in no way trying to defend m0ney here. He has proved himself to be one of few actual bigots several times over in this thread.

Only thanks to bigots Europe will survive and you will be thanking them.



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Puppyroach said:
Nettles said:

Sweden just dropped interest rates again today.From -0.35 to -0.5.
This is complete insanity.They're just about done, everything they are doing is unsustainable.

Gold up USD 50 in the past 12 hours.Some serious shit brewing in the markets.

You are being very dramatic, and it´s competely unnecessary. Negative interest rates aren´t by defintion bad, a government need to be responsible with how they handle the national economy and don´t inflate the currency when the rest of the world is so unstable.

It was expected that they would drop the interest since the stock market globally has been volatile and since the national banks plan is to keep the interest extremely low for atleast a couple of more years.

With housing prices on the steep rise and unemployment, especially among the youth and first time buyers, being really high without much sign of improvement, it might be a bad idea to stimulate more and bigger loans right now.

Swedish economical policies right now are not sustainable or very smart, the same goes for Norway (productivity way down, they elevate the influx levels from the oil fund to counteract the diminished margins and total and make up ridiculous posts and positions within the public sector to keep unemployment down). Scandinavia as a whole is doing better than most of the world; but it's kind of like saying that you're taller than a dwarf, it doesn't really mean that you're tall.
Scandinavia needs a more future-proof economic model, and fast, Sweden amasses debts and maintains its high unemployment rates, while Norway neglects infrastructure and puts municipalities in mountains of debt to the state and enforces regional cuts and saving.
All moves we're making are simply postponing a crisis; not counteracting it.

There's a lot to be proud of for Scandinavians, but proper economic foresight and future thoughts towards stability are not among them.



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Mummelmann said:

With housing prices on the steep rise and unemployment, especially among the youth and first time buyers, being really high without much sign of improvement, it might be a bad idea to stimulate more and bigger loans right now.

Swedish economical policies right now are not sustainable or very smart, the same goes for Norway (productivity way down, they elevate the influx levels from the oil fund to counteract the diminished margins and total and make up ridiculous posts and positions within the public sector to keep unemployment down). Scandinavia as a whole is doing better than most of the world; but it's kind of like saying that you're taller than a dwarf, it doesn't really mean that you're tall.
Scandinavia needs a more future-proof economic model, and fast, Sweden amasses debts and maintains its high unemployment rates, while Norway neglects infrastructure and puts municipalities in mountains of debt to the state and enforces regional cuts and saving.
All moves we're making are simply postponing a crisis; not counteracting it.

There's a lot to be proud of for Scandinavians, but proper economic foresight and future thoughts towards stability are not among them.

Well, unemployment has been on a steady decrease for some time now, especially among youth. Also, GDP growth was steady last year and debt as part of GDP is not big at all. So I wouldn´t be very worried at the moment.



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Puppyroach said:
Mummelmann said:

With housing prices on the steep rise and unemployment, especially among the youth and first time buyers, being really high without much sign of improvement, it might be a bad idea to stimulate more and bigger loans right now.

Swedish economical policies right now are not sustainable or very smart, the same goes for Norway (productivity way down, they elevate the influx levels from the oil fund to counteract the diminished margins and total and make up ridiculous posts and positions within the public sector to keep unemployment down). Scandinavia as a whole is doing better than most of the world; but it's kind of like saying that you're taller than a dwarf, it doesn't really mean that you're tall.
Scandinavia needs a more future-proof economic model, and fast, Sweden amasses debts and maintains its high unemployment rates, while Norway neglects infrastructure and puts municipalities in mountains of debt to the state and enforces regional cuts and saving.
All moves we're making are simply postponing a crisis; not counteracting it.

There's a lot to be proud of for Scandinavians, but proper economic foresight and future thoughts towards stability are not among them.

Well, unemployment has been on a steady decrease for some time now, especially among youth. Also, GDP growth was steady last year and debt as part of GDP is not big at all. So I wouldn´t be very worried at the moment.

Key phrase being "for the moment"; I'm thinking 5-10 years ahead. I'm not 100% sure, but in Norway, a part-time job or people who have yet to gain work permits or are on benefits for temporary health issues (as examples) do not count as unemployed. So those figures are only one part of the equation and the figures are still alarmingly high (and on the rise in Norway, with a lot of high-paid, highly educated staff being fired from companies like Statoil, causing problems with expensive housing that can't be purchased below their paygrade and loans that can't be served since there's a roof on benefits payments compared to full-time salaries in the higher echelons of employment).

For the moment, things are fine, or thereabouts, but we can't continue in the same way for very long. Of course; both countries having a locked political situation with opposition with great influence doesn't help either, coalitions are grossly inefficient at moving policies forwards and through.



End of 2016 hardware sales:

Wii U: 15 million. PS4: 54 million. One: 30 million. 3DS: 64.8 million. PSVita: 15.2 million.