Forums - Politics Discussion - Earth is rapidly greening because of CO2 fertilization (NASA study)

haxxiy said:
Qwark said:

It has been a long known fact that higher CO2 concentrations improve the growth of plants. Most greenhouses in NL get CO2 supplied from the harbor of Rotterdam. Anyway salt water infiltration will also kill a lot of plant life and floodings will cause the soils to cause more salt. And salt isn't exactly a thing most plant species endure very well.

Anywho as other said CO2 also causes oceans to accidify which causes corals to bleach and nearly a third off al fish species need coral to survive. Also the exo skeletons of shell fish and krill are desolving because of this acidification. So if anything climate change will rather cause the 6th mass extinction than a new bloom of life.

So the only sector really happy with this are farmers and companies that cultivate wood for furniture.

This is possibly false, since it has been implied the acids used to simulate the more acid water of warmer oceans doesn't lead to accurate results, and certain animals might calcify more, not less, in the presence of more CO2.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/320/5874/336

Such data is consistent with the absence of mass extinction of corals back on the Cretaceous or the P-E, when temperatures were more than 10º C warmer than the present and sea temperatures might have casually risen above 35º C on tropical waters.

Of course, that doesn't mean it won't face another issues such as bleaching etc. but, really, plastic polution, overfishing and commercial navigation are much, much larger issues on all likehood to marine ecosystems, and issues which doesn't get the same level of attention on top of that.

Well organisms do adapt to climate change, this one is a little different. Mainly due to the speed of the change. There are species which already have evolved the last decade to addapt and have a thicker shell than a few decades ago. Although it also makes them slower so it's a trade-off.

Anyway its a combination off all things which will cause massive damage to the seas. Algae bloom caused by over fertilisation doesnt help either, since the algea neccesary to build coral compete with other weeds and algea.

Fishing also severely damages coral reefs and the effect of microplastics and pesticides/chemical dumps in the ocean probably isn't helping either. However acidification does stack since corals recover faster the higher the Ph value of the waters.

Although the rate the ocean is acidifying and the climate changing has pretty much never occurred, outside of other mass extinction events such as when the asteroid stirked which eliminated the dinosaur and the aftermath of that event. The corals might survive the acidification, although large reefs are already severly damaged, especially in the Caribbean area.

So in the end acidification alone might ir might not let corals go extinct. We simply don't know because of the current rate of climate change and accidfication is way faster than before and evolution, as effictive as it is fir organisms to addapt to extreme conditions needs a lot of time.

So while accidification even at the current rate alone might not be enough to nake coral reefs go extinct. Its pretty safe to assume it makes reefs more vulnerable and that might just be enough to lower the tipping point of no return low enough for all the other cap we do, for us to surpass that tipping point.

 

Although I would rather not take chances of losing any major reef because off acidification. Bleaching is still a major issue for a big part of the great barrier reef, along with an abbundance of plastic and nutrients. Over fishing is somewhat controlled in Australia.

Last edited by Qwark - on 25 February 2018

Please excuse my (probally) poor grammar

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CaptainExplosion said:
Aura7541 said:
Ocean acidification would still be an issue...

How do we prevent that?

Carbon capture and iron fertilization are some proposed solutions, but they have their setbacks.



Aura7541 said:
CaptainExplosion said:

How do we prevent that?

Carbon capture and iron fertilization are some proposed solutions, but they have their setbacks.

Not to mention neither are long therm solutions and they combat the symptoms not the main issue. But as temporal solutions they can buy us some time to decrease our carbon footprint.



Please excuse my (probally) poor grammar

Unfortunately, the greening also makes plants like poison ivy larger and more potent. It also makes blue-green algae a bigger threat to ecosystems. Though growing larger crops is a plus, the loss of farmland due to climate change offsets this gain.



CaptainExplosion said:
SvennoJ said:
Oh great, more grass to mow, which is one of the contributors to rising CO2 levels, a self reinforcing loop!

Couldn't you just, you know, not mow it?

I'm all for it, yet it seems to be part of the Canadian citizenship duties. Can't have the lawn looking anything other than Wimbledon stadium ready! Summer here is the sound of lawnmowers.



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Qwark said:
haxxiy said:

This is possibly false, since it has been implied the acids used to simulate the more acid water of warmer oceans doesn't lead to accurate results, and certain animals might calcify more, not less, in the presence of more CO2.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/320/5874/336

Such data is consistent with the absence of mass extinction of corals back on the Cretaceous or the P-E, when temperatures were more than 10º C warmer than the present and sea temperatures might have casually risen above 35º C on tropical waters.

Of course, that doesn't mean it won't face another issues such as bleaching etc. but, really, plastic polution, overfishing and commercial navigation are much, much larger issues on all likehood to marine ecosystems, and issues which doesn't get the same level of attention on top of that.

Well organisms do adapt to climate change, this one is a little different. Mainly due to the speed of the change. There are species which already have evolved the last decade to addapt and have a thicker shell than a few decades ago. Although it also makes them slower so it's a trade-off.

Anyway its a combination off all things which will cause massive damage to the seas. Algae bloom caused by over fertilisation doesnt help either, since the algea neccesary to build coral compete with other weeds and algea.

Fishing also severely damages coral reefs and the effect of microplastics and pesticides/chemical dumps in the ocean probably isn't helping either. However acidification does stack since corals recover faster the higher the Ph value of the waters.

Although the rate the ocean is acidifying and the climate changing has pretty much never occurred, outside of other mass extinction events such as when the asteroid stirked which eliminated the dinosaur and the aftermath of that event. The corals might survive the acidification, although large reefs are already severly damaged, especially in the Caribbean area.

So in the end acidification alone might ir might not let corals go extinct. We simply don't know because of the current rate of climate change and accidfication is way faster than before and evolution, as effictive as it is fir organisms to addapt to extreme conditions needs a lot of time.

So while accidification even at the current rate alone might not be enough to nake coral reefs go extinct. Its pretty safe to assume it makes reefs more vulnerable and that might just be enough to lower the tipping point of no return low enough for all the other cap we do, for us to surpass that tipping point.

 

Although I would rather not take chances of losing any major reef because off acidification. Bleaching is still a major issue for a big part of the great barrier reef, along with an abbundance of plastic and nutrients. Over fishing is somewhat controlled in Australia.

What's a good way to stop coral bleaching?



betacon said:
GProgrammer said:

No, this actually supports what he has been saying

Al Gore has done nothing but spread bullshit propaganda about the affects of global warming, one of the biggest danger to his own cause. The less people hear from that moron the better.

You don't believe Al Gore but ManBearPig is real and he will eat innocent children if we don't stop him, ManBearPig is real man!




Twitter @CyberMalistix

Hello? Anyone gonna answer my question about coral bleaching?



CaptainExplosion said:
Qwark said:

Well organisms do adapt to climate change, this one is a little different. Mainly due to the speed of the change. There are species which already have evolved the last decade to addapt and have a thicker shell than a few decades ago. Although it also makes them slower so it's a trade-off.

Anyway its a combination off all things which will cause massive damage to the seas. Algae bloom caused by over fertilisation doesnt help either, since the algea neccesary to build coral compete with other weeds and algea.

Fishing also severely damages coral reefs and the effect of microplastics and pesticides/chemical dumps in the ocean probably isn't helping either. However acidification does stack since corals recover faster the higher the Ph value of the waters.

Although the rate the ocean is acidifying and the climate changing has pretty much never occurred, outside of other mass extinction events such as when the asteroid stirked which eliminated the dinosaur and the aftermath of that event. The corals might survive the acidification, although large reefs are already severly damaged, especially in the Caribbean area.

So in the end acidification alone might ir might not let corals go extinct. We simply don't know because of the current rate of climate change and accidfication is way faster than before and evolution, as effictive as it is fir organisms to addapt to extreme conditions needs a lot of time.

So while accidification even at the current rate alone might not be enough to nake coral reefs go extinct. Its pretty safe to assume it makes reefs more vulnerable and that might just be enough to lower the tipping point of no return low enough for all the other cap we do, for us to surpass that tipping point.

 

Although I would rather not take chances of losing any major reef because off acidification. Bleaching is still a major issue for a big part of the great barrier reef, along with an abbundance of plastic and nutrients. Over fishing is somewhat controlled in Australia.

What's a good way to stop coral bleaching?

Well the best way is to decrease the amount of CO2 emission and to decrease the emission of acidic compounds.

You can fight the symptoms of coral bleaching by either mixing cold with hot water in the oceans to cool the water, so that the algea (zoöxanthelle) that give coral color have a better habitat. Australia is investing 2.2 billion in big mixers. Decreasing wastewater and chemical waste dumps in oceans in feneral also makes the habit better for Corals and the Algea, so that wouldn't hurt either.

Adding more calcium to the water also works, since calciumcarbonate increases the pH, but you would need the entire coast of dover multiple times. So cutting fossil fuels is really the best way we have.

 

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/03/there-s-only-one-way-save-great-barrier-reef-scientists-conclude

 

https://www.google.nl/amp/s/www.popsci.com/amp/coral-bleaching-water-pipeline



Please excuse my (probally) poor grammar

Qwark said:
CaptainExplosion said:

What's a good way to stop coral bleaching?

Well the best way is to decrease the amount of CO2 emission and to decrease the emission of acidic compounds.

You can fight the symptoms of coral bleaching by either mixing cold with hot water in the oceans to cool the water, so that the algea (zoöxanthelle) that give coral color have a better habitat. Australia is investing 2.2 billion in big mixers. Decreasing wastewater and chemical waste dumps in oceans in feneral also makes the habit better for Corals and the Algea, so that wouldn't hurt either.

Adding more calcium to the water also works, since calciumcarbonate increases the pH, but you would need the entire coast of dover multiple times. So cutting fossil fuels is really the best way we have.

 

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/03/there-s-only-one-way-save-great-barrier-reef-scientists-conclude

 

https://www.google.nl/amp/s/www.popsci.com/amp/coral-bleaching-water-pipeline

That's what I thought. Kill the fossil fuels! ^^

And speaking of algae plumes, could we harvest the algae as a fuel source? I've heard of it being done.