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Do you think this idea would work (DRM Related)?

Forums - Gaming Discussion - Do you think this idea would work (DRM Related)?

SamuelRSmith said:
My idea:

All discs and consoles have a unique ID.

When you put a disc in a console, Microsoft/Sony/whoever register that disc ID to that console ID. From that point on, so long as the console is connected to the Internet (so it can verify the console-disc ID mapping), it can play the game without the disc.

When you put your disc in another console, the unique disc ID is then registered to that console.

The downside is that it requires an online connection for discless play, and also an online connection for the first time you play a game on the console. The actual process of registering the console will require minimum bandwidth, so it wouldn't be a problem in 99% of households who actually have the means to buy these machines.

People didn't want to have to go online to play a game from disc and I doubt 99% of households with consoles have them connected to the internet 24/7 or at all. Adding a unique disc ID costs extra as well. Much easier is to add a code for a digital copy with each new disc sale. Same way most blu-ray movies give you a digital copy. Register it to your account after installing and done. However publishers have no doubt most gamers would immediately sell the disc afterwards. Hence all these complicated online and registration check procedures.

They could make the ownership of the disc more desirable with extras like with blu-rays. However they don't want to do that, margins on digital sales are simply to good to pass up. This conspiracy theory that retail stores keep digital prices high is just that, a conspiracy theory. Publishers realized that digital is the perfect way to raise prices for the simple convenience of no disc swapping and offering preload on the much desirable pre order business.

Discs have only been made less desirable, flimsy cases, no manuals, no extras on the disc, have to install everything to hdd, no benefits from loading from blu-ray simultaneously next to hdd. The only thing they haven't been able to take away yet is ownership. With a unqiue ID and registering discs to your account, that last major point can be made history as well. It happened to PC games already.



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SamuelRSmith said:
My idea:

All discs and consoles have a unique ID.

When you put a disc in a console, Microsoft/Sony/whoever register that disc ID to that console ID. From that point on, so long as the console is connected to the Internet (so it can verify the console-disc ID mapping), it can play the game without the disc.

When you put your disc in another console, the unique disc ID is then registered to that console.

The downside is that it requires an online connection for discless play, and also an online connection for the first time you play a game on the console. The actual process of registering the console will require minimum bandwidth, so it wouldn't be a problem in 99% of households who actually have the means to buy these machines.

That again comes back to always online DRM ect, which nearly cost Xbox everything.

People hate DRM, and the unique ID for the discs will drive prices up.

Waste of time and effort to do something silly everyone just ends up hateing you for.

 

I feel like these are all bad ideas, and dont know why people keep rehashing them.

Why is everyone so eager for more and more DRM?

 

My idea:

Let people damn well own the copies of the games they buy and do with them as they please.

Anyone notice how happy people where when Sony announced that? Let people enjoy their games, the end, none of this online DRM crap.



Number of days to reach 50M from 40M : 198 days
Number of days to reach 60M from 50M : 187 days
Number of days to reach 70M from 60M : 175 days
Number of days to reach 80M from 70M : 227 days

Necro-bump this 2020: http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/thread.php?id=229249

brilliant idea. only problem is that the only way this works is if at the time of inserting any disc your console must be online. cause it has to be a system wide thing for the console to check online to first verify if the disc is locked or isn't from the license database.

which brings us to the same MS issue. always online.



SvennoJ said:

People didn't want to have to go online to play a game from disc and I doubt 99% of households with consoles have them connected to the internet 24/7 or at all. Adding a unique disc ID costs extra as well.

Doesn't require always online at all. Only the first time you use the disc on the console, or if you want to play discless. Seeing as most people buy a handful of games each year, "always on" becomes "online 5 times a year".

I didn't say 99% of individuals, I said 99% of people who have the means to buy a game console. The kind of functionality I'm talking about could be achieved using just a few kilobytes of data, meaning it could work on cell network, satellite, hell, even dialup, with barely any time delay or cost to the end user.

The unique ID is part of the data on the disc that is written. A 5 digit code using alphanumeric characters allows for 50 million different unique codes for one game, and takes up 175 bytes.



JRPGfan said:

That again comes back to always online DRM ect, which nearly cost Xbox everything.

People hate DRM, and the unique ID for the discs will drive prices up.

My idea:

Let people damn well own the copies of the games they buy and do with them as they please.

Anyone notice how happy people where when Sony announced that? Let people enjoy their games, the end, none of this online DRM crap.

It's not always online drm, see what I just posted above.

Albeit, I admit I have no idea how it would effect the disc manufacturing process.

Nothing realistically changes with what I suggested for anybody except the very first time you insert a disc into a machine. Compared to the 7gb patch you'll have to download when you insert that disc the first time (and, every time if you're like me and have month long gaps between play sessions), 175 bytes is hardly going to effect anybody.



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d21lewis said:
Wright said:

But how can stores know that you've deactivated the DRM from your console when going to sell your used games? Worse yet, what if people start purchasing used games and they can't play them because someone else has them online locked with DRM?

Waaaay ahead of ya, Wrighty Boy!  They could just pop the disc into the console they have behind the counter or search the serial number via some sort of database.  It'll say "The content of the disc is locked" or something.

Boo yah!

*edit*  Also, specific stores could have the option of disabling the lock.  If, for example, you sell your copy of Call of Duty that's swell.  But if you connect your console to the internet, your game expires like a Playstation Plus game with no Plus! 

O_o... When I worked retail *shudder* people would on average trade in five or six games at a time.  Sometimes it could be as many as 30, and we even had piles of 100.  Having to check each disc would make it nearly impossible, and people would try to take advantage of this system.  Plus, this would drive system prices up at least a bit since they'd have to have a cd writer.

I have a much better idea... if people don't want to change discs, they buy the game digitally.  They can't sell it, but that's the trade off.



SamuelRSmith said:
SvennoJ said:

People didn't want to have to go online to play a game from disc and I doubt 99% of households with consoles have them connected to the internet 24/7 or at all. Adding a unique disc ID costs extra as well.

Doesn't require always online at all. Only the first time you use the disc on the console, or if you want to play discless. Seeing as most people buy a handful of games each year, "always on" becomes "online 5 times a year".

I didn't say 99% of individuals, I said 99% of people who have the means to buy a game console. The kind of functionality I'm talking about could be achieved using just a few kilobytes of data, meaning it could work on cell network, satellite, hell, even dialup, with barely any time delay or cost to the end user.

The unique ID is part of the data on the disc that is written. A 5 digit code using alphanumeric characters allows for 50 million different unique codes for one game, and takes up 175 bytes.

It's an inconvenience which also questions ownership status as you're now activating a license.
But I'm surprised to see that it's actually up to 95% already and that was almost 2 years ago
http://www.gamespot.com/articles/e3-2014-95-of-ps4s-connected-to-the-internet-youtube-app-coming-this-year/1100-6420285/

However the unique ID is the problem. The size doesn't matter, putting it on the disc is the difficulty. A disc image is mastered into a stamper which is used to mass produce discs via a mould process. There is no place for variable data. That would somehow need to be added as a separate step on a different location of the disc.

Anyway it would suck if you take the console with you on holiday and you forgot to register the games you want to play at home :/
Mobile phone you say, $6 per kb while roaming, lol.

It costs more, it adds extra work to maintain the database, and it puts question marks on longevity and ownership. All for not having to swap a disc which you can skip already by buying the digital version in the first place.



SvennoJ said:
SamuelRSmith said:

Doesn't require always online at all. Only the first time you use the disc on the console, or if you want to play discless. Seeing as most people buy a handful of games each year, "always on" becomes "online 5 times a year".

I didn't say 99% of individuals, I said 99% of people who have the means to buy a game console. The kind of functionality I'm talking about could be achieved using just a few kilobytes of data, meaning it could work on cell network, satellite, hell, even dialup, with barely any time delay or cost to the end user.

The unique ID is part of the data on the disc that is written. A 5 digit code using alphanumeric characters allows for 50 million different unique codes for one game, and takes up 175 bytes.


It costs more, it adds extra work to maintain the database, and it puts question marks on longevity and ownership. All for not having to swap a disc which you can skip already by buying the digital version in the first place.

Yeah. The future proof problem comes into play. The database must be active forever. If the PSN or XB live service is orphaned, in say 15 years from the systems. You're fucked. Just like a digital copy anyway. That is not what people want. People are litterly trying to just copy the digital version. For the sake of being that lazy with swapping discs. The digital copy is the answer. Accept you lose sellability. And reuseabilty, in the future.



That's what MS first wanted to do with X1.