Forums - Gaming Discussion - Keiji Inafune says Japanese developers need to learn from overseas devs

Polygon

When asked about the state of the Japanese game industry, Keiji Inafune — producer of Soul Sacrifice, Resident Evil and Dead Rising — believes Japanese developers have to learn from their overseas counterparts, according to an interview with IGN.

"I hope Japanese game developers are breaking through the stagnation," Inafune told IGN. "However, the reality isn't as good as I want it to be. I see they're starting to be aware of the problem and that they have to do something. They know they have to learn more from western games and create games that'll sell more in the western market. However, they don't know what to do or how to do it."

Inafune went on to say that although some developers are saying the Japanese industry is fine, he believes that it is "wishful thinking."

"Words are not enough, we must act and prove it," he said to IGN. "Unless at least a few titles from Japan make it to the top 10 games of the year worldwide, we won't prove it."

Inafune has worked prominently with Western studios on titles like Blue Castle Games' Dead Rising 2 and Spark Unlimited's Yaiba: Ninja Gaiden Z.

Inafune's opinion comes shortly after the annual Japanese Independent Game Development and Media Summit called BitSummit, which took place in Kyoto, Japan last month. Created and directed by Q Games' James Mielke, the event aimed to introduce western media to independent Japanese game developers to create future working bonds.

Mielke believes that if the western media know Japanese developers by name, they would be more inclined to write about their work, instead of the "same old Call of Duty headlines."

Polygon reported from BitSummit where we attended a keynote from Yohei Kataoka CEO and game director at Crispy's, the developers of Tokyo Jungle.

Kataoka said that independent Japanese developers should use their unique qualities to their advantage, and he encouraged them to make the games that they want to make and to think less about marketing their games overseas.

"I don't think [Japan's game industry] is anywhere near over ... it's something we should be proud of," Kataoka said in his keynote.



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lol, i never listen to Inafune. seriously would prefer diversity than a world full of #MERICA

http://www.vooks.net/img/2014/08/ibqHM48o8MbQQl.gif

I don't disagree, but it depends on how it is done. They can learn from them, extract the best concepts and create something better. They've been languishing lately.

 

Playstation = The Beast from the East

Sony + Nintendo = WIN! PS3 + PSV + PS4 + Wii U + 3DS


ktay95 said:
lol, i never listen to Inafune. seriously would prefer diversity than a world full of #MERICA


Hes right, the Japanese need to break free of their ignorance to western knowledge of how to maximize output of games and then put their own cultural spin on it. 



S.T.A.G.E. said:
ktay95 said:
lol, i never listen to Inafune. seriously would prefer diversity than a world full of #MERICA

Hes right, the Japanese need to break free of their ignorance to western knowledge of how to maximize output of games and then put their own cultural spin on it. 


Indeed, S.T.A.G.E. I just want to add that the goal is not to merely have Japanese people making American games. If any of you understand the potential of creativity of Japanese people, then you'd agree that their gaming industry sucks pretty bad compared to other media industries, e.g. music and film.

For example, I grew up listening to Japanese music, especially underground or experimental bands. Their music scene is so vast and diverse, and they are great innovators. They can grab a genre originating from the west and yet make it so Japanese (cultural spin, as you put it). And the results are amazing. They have really poppish stuff, yet at times you'd be surprised to find some real alternative stuff high up on their charts too. The people of Japan have inspired tastes and their passion push forth excellence and creativity in many of their productions.

Films too. While they don't have Hollywood-type budgets, they have many auteurs specialising in highly unique expressions. And with elements like quirkiness or poetic depth, they reach places no westerner has ever gone.

So I think Inafune is right, especially about the attitude of developers. Nowadays the medium of gaming is maturing, and many studios are exploring deeper ways to communicate, to narrate their vision. Japanese developers have got to get on board, to get really serious about the art of the medium, instead of just messing about with long-dead tropes or immature fetishism. Yeah, they truly need some visionaries to lead the way.



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He's only saying that because he knows we want to hear that and earn our respect. I don't want to play interactive movies and glitchfests every day. Japanese games are the only games I play (Dark Souls, Bayonetta, Ni no Kuni, Monster Hunter, Nintendo games). His lastest game Soul Sacrifice doesn't look like any western title out there. It looks like a good polished game focussed on gameplay and I would like to play it more than any western title I can think of. Unfortunately I'm not going to buy a PSVita.

For Japanese games which are completely unique and wacky, no. For Japanese games which are AAA in scale and often more closer to western games then yes, he's right. Looking at you Final Fantasy...


LilChicken22 said:
He's only saying that because he knows we want to hear that and earn our respect. I don't want to play interactive movies and glitchfests every day. Japanese games are the only games I play (Dark Souls, Bayonetta, Ni no Kuni, Monster Hunter, Nintendo games). His lastest game Soul Sacrifice doesn't look like any western title out there. It looks like a good polished game focussed on gameplay and I would like to play it more than any western title I can think of. Unfortunately I'm not going to buy a PSVita.


There are more Japanese glitchfests than western ones. They have fallen behind big time dude. Inafune isnt in denial or sucking up to westerners. He understands what sells and keeps and open mind how to evolve as an artist. Luckily the youth of Japan are more open minded than the older generation or we would be in for a hard time.



I've always had deep respect for this man, even if I don't agree with everything said.

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I don't think I have been paying enough attention to this to know what to think.