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Microsoft sees Fable III as a "great first step" for PC gaming

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makingmusic476 said:

From Kotaku:

In terms of revenue, Windows is far and away the largest gaming platform in the world, so it's an incredibly important part of Microsoft's business. From core games like "Fable III" to casual, social and Facebook titles, more gaming happens on Windows than anywhere else. Windows 7 is a world-class gaming platform, and you can bet Microsoft has a vested interest in using it as a platform for amazing first party content. "Fable III" on Windows as well as Xbox 360 this holiday is a great first step, and we'll have more news for you later this summer.

Pure hubris from Microsoft. They keep making statements like it is a "first great step" and they may convince me to give them the middle finger by buying an overpriced, igloo of a laptop from Apple.

A first great step would be fixing Windows Vista instead of running your mouth without any specifics besides "later this summer." Goes to show you that this "great first step" is a signal to their investors that they intend to rush Fable 3 so that it can sell 3 million while having game breaking glitches (I hope not because I love the Fable series).

Microsoft is sounding like Sony where they drop code words in interviews as signals to their investors, while hoping that the gaming world gobbles up their crap like Thanksgiving leftovers. Microsoft, you can take your undercooked turducken and shove it back in the oven until it is ready for my mouth.



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Killiana1a said:
makingmusic476 said:

From Kotaku:

In terms of revenue, Windows is far and away the largest gaming platform in the world, so it's an incredibly important part of Microsoft's business. From core games like "Fable III" to casual, social and Facebook titles, more gaming happens on Windows than anywhere else. Windows 7 is a world-class gaming platform, and you can bet Microsoft has a vested interest in using it as a platform for amazing first party content. "Fable III" on Windows as well as Xbox 360 this holiday is a great first step, and we'll have more news for you later this summer.

Pure hubris from Microsoft. They keep making statements like it is a "first great step" and they may convince me to give them the middle finger by buying an overpriced, igloo of a laptop from Apple.

A first great step would be fixing Windows Vista instead of running your mouth without any specifics besides "later this summer." Goes to show you that this "great first step" is a signal to their investors that they intend to rush Fable 3 so that it can sell 3 million while having game breaking glitches (I hope not because I love the Fable series).

Microsoft is sounding like Sony where they drop code words in interviews as signals to their investors, while hoping that the gaming world gobbles up their crap like Thanksgiving leftovers. Microsoft, you can take your undercooked turducken and shove it back in the oven until it is ready for my mouth.

What is wrong with Vista at the moment?  It runs fine on my system and has for 3 years or so, even pre SP1 it worked fine when tweaked properly.  Vista bashing was old 2 years ago now its just pathetic imo.



I don't know if this was discussed already. But it appears fable 3 will be coming out on PC before it comes out on 360.

 

I believe what microsoft is doing is "testing the waters" so to speak. They've been giving 360 priority over their own Operating System for some time now. It's really hurt the PC gaming business.

 

If sales on Fable 3 for PC are close to 360 sales, then Microsoft will be putting alot more money into PC gaming.



Just reading the first page of the thread I must already agree with makingmusic, okr, Foamer, zarx and aragod. I also partially agree with dahuman, with the difference that in my case MS can kiss my white Italian ass instead.



Stwike him, Centuwion. Stwike him vewy wuffly! (Pontius Pilate, "Life of Brian")

A fart without stink is like a sky without stars.

TGS, Third Grade Shooter: brand new genre invented by Kevin Butler exclusively for Natal WiiToo Kinect. PEW! PEW-PEW-PEW!

        

ZzzzZzzzZzzz... Nothin' new here. Fable III won't take any step in any direction. It'll just be another Fable title that'll come and go like yesterday's news. The biggest steps in PC gaming have already been taken. The Sims, Half-life, Starcraft, etc etc. These are games that took big steps in the right direction for PC gaming. Fable III? Unlikely.

I will be pleasantly surprised if they do pull a rabbit of their hat though.



Why must JRPG female leads suck so bad?

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Just to provide a little context as to why Microsoft might actually mean it this time-

From http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/10_24/b4182036703891.htm

Microsoft needs Natal—or whatever it's called by the time it goes on sale—to be a hit. The technology is inarguably cool, and is a rare bright spot in Microsoft's decade-old—and thus far mostly disappointing—push to move beyond PCs and into game consoles, music players, and smartphones. Operating income at its Entertainment & Devices unit, which is responsible for those products, is expected to come in at $773 million for the year that ends June 30, according to UBS Securities (UBS). That's a 10 percent operating margin, compared with 72 percent for Windows, its most profitable business. While the Xbox is a strong No. 2 in the video game market (after the Nintendo Wii), the entertainment division has lost $8.6 billion on sales of $49 billion since 1999, estimates Katherine Egbert of Jeffries & Co. An initiative to build Internet-based TV systems has yet to take off, and its iPod-like Zune music players have bombed. While Apple (AAPL) just sold its two millionth iPad, Microsoft recently scrapped a tablet code-named Courier. In smartphones, Microsoft's share in the first quarter was 6.8 percent, down from 10.2 percent the year before.

and-

Even as the company hypes Natal and its new mobile software, Windows Phone7, investors don't expect smash hits; in fact, they'd settle for small losses on these and other gadgets. "It's hard to make the case this has been a good use of shareholder capital," says Todd S. Lowenstein, who runs HighMark Capital's value fund. "I don't fault them for trying this stuff, but investors are getting impatient." Other investors suggest that, like IBM (IBM) a decade ago, Microsoft should refocus its efforts on its massively profitable PC and corporate software businesses. Its cash from operations last quarter alone was $7.4billion, a company record. Yet its shares are down about 50percent since Steve Ballmer took over as CEO on Jan.13, 2000. "The stock would go up if Microsoft exited its consumer businesses," says Bill Whyman of ISI Group.



Foamer said:

Just to provide a little context as to why Microsoft might actually mean it this time-

From http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/10_24/b4182036703891.htm

 

Microsoft needs Natal—or whatever it's called by the time it goes on sale—to be a hit. The technology is inarguably cool, and is a rare bright spot in Microsoft's decade-old—and thus far mostly disappointing—push to move beyond PCs and into game consoles, music players, and smartphones. Operating income at its Entertainment & Devices unit, which is responsible for those products, is expected to come in at $773 million for the year that ends June 30, according to UBS Securities (UBS). That's a 10 percent operating margin, compared with 72 percent for Windows, its most profitable business. While the Xbox is a strong No. 2 in the video game market (after the Nintendo Wii), the entertainment division has lost $8.6 billion on sales of $49 billion since 1999, estimates Katherine Egbert of Jeffries & Co. An initiative to build Internet-based TV systems has yet to take off, and its iPod-like Zune music players have bombed. While Apple (AAPL) just sold its two millionth iPad, Microsoft recently scrapped a tablet code-named Courier. In smartphones, Microsoft's share in the first quarter was 6.8 percent, down from 10.2 percent the year before.

and-

 

Even as the company hypes Natal and its new mobile software, Windows Phone7, investors don't expect smash hits; in fact, they'd settle for small losses on these and other gadgets. "It's hard to make the case this has been a good use of shareholder capital," says Todd S. Lowenstein, who runs HighMark Capital's value fund. "I don't fault them for trying this stuff, but investors are getting impatient." Other investors suggest that, like IBM (IBM) a decade ago, Microsoft should refocus its efforts on its massively profitable PC and corporate software businesses. Its cash from operations last quarter alone was $7.4billion, a company record. Yet its shares are down about 50percent since Steve Ballmer took over as CEO on Jan.13, 2000. "The stock would go up if Microsoft exited its consumer businesses," says Bill Whyman of ISI Group.

Very interesting