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the-pi-guy said:
eva01beserk said:

Yea I noticed late that you did multiple responses. 

Thats still not a good thing considering that they have 1/9 of the US population but have 1/3 the poor of the entire country. Thats still insanely dis proportionally.  They just cant be the ones who spend the most per capita, the funds are just not there. 

Try 1/8th the population of the US, and slightly higher than 1/8th (13.6%) of the poor.  Not insanely disproportionate. 

Poverty measures vary immensely, and don't tend to include things like food stamps and housing assistance.  

Some poverty measures look worse because they'll take into account housing costs.  Which again, has a whole host of problems that have nothing to do with California's social programs.  

> They just cant be the ones who spend the most per capita, the funds are just not there. 


California is one of the states that pays more in taxes, than they get in benefits.  

True,but that makes the report faulty to remove the people receiving help from that measure. taking into consideration how many people are on benefits according to the Census Bureau’s Supplemental Poverty Measure, then california has 1/3 of the total poor of the country.



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