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Forums - Politics Discussion - The Political Spectrum quiz

Another problem with this grid is that authoritarian and libertarian are both loaded terms and not opposites of one another.

Many people take "libertarian" to mean unfettered laissez-faire/neoliberal capitalist economics - which is a fundamentally authoritarian so long as people within those structures depend on wages and insurance plans for survival and are beholden to contracts; a CEO without red tape is therefore no different from a mini-dictator. Anti-authoritarian measures to regulate the power of corporations are also anti-libertarian. Laws which prevent corporate monopolization are also anti-authoritarian and anti-Libertarian.

The opposite of authoritarianism is not libertarianism, it's anarchism.



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.

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Jumpin said:

Another problem with this grid is that authoritarian and libertarian are both loaded terms and not opposites of one another.

Many people take "libertarian" to mean unfettered laissez-faire/neoliberal capitalist economics - which is a fundamentally authoritarian so long as people within those structures depend on wages and insurance plans for survival and are beholden to contracts; a CEO without red tape is therefore no different from a mini-dictator. Anti-authoritarian measures to regulate the power of corporations are also anti-libertarian. Laws which prevent corporate monopolization are also anti-authoritarian and anti-Libertarian.

The opposite of authoritarianism is not libertarianism, it's anarchism.

Historically, "libertarian" was a synonym for anarchism or the libertarian branch of socialism. In most places it is still used that way, and even in the United States where right-wing liberalism has appropriated the "libertarian" label to an extent that older sense is also still used. 

The first "libertarian" was Joseph Dejacque an early communist anarchist who used the word to circumvent anti-sedition laws in France which prohibited the use of "anarchist." 



Jumpin said:

Another problem with this grid is that authoritarian and libertarian are both loaded terms and not opposites of one another.

Many people take "libertarian" to mean unfettered laissez-faire/neoliberal capitalist economics - which is a fundamentally authoritarian so long as people within those structures depend on wages and insurance plans for survival and are beholden to contracts; a CEO without red tape is therefore no different from a mini-dictator. Anti-authoritarian measures to regulate the power of corporations are also anti-libertarian. Laws which prevent corporate monopolization are also anti-authoritarian and anti-Libertarian.

The opposite of authoritarianism is not libertarianism, it's anarchism.

That's only in the American context where the right wing has coopted the term. Historically, libertarianism is exactly the opposite if libertarianism



Just a guy who doesn't want to be bored. Also

Jumpin said:

Another problem with this grid is that authoritarian and libertarian are both loaded terms and not opposites of one another.

Many people take "libertarian" to mean unfettered laissez-faire/neoliberal capitalist economics - which is a fundamentally authoritarian so long as people within those structures depend on wages and insurance plans for survival and are beholden to contracts; a CEO without red tape is therefore no different from a mini-dictator. Anti-authoritarian measures to regulate the power of corporations are also anti-libertarian. Laws which prevent corporate monopolization are also anti-authoritarian and anti-Libertarian.

The opposite of authoritarianism is not libertarianism, it's anarchism.

I think you completely misunderstood authoritarianism. It says right in the name that it's about authority. Authority comes through a governing body and laws. Corporations are not authorities. However libertarianism can lead to authoritarianism when corporations become powerful enough to replace or usurp any other authority. We're not at that dystopian point yet even though it might feel that way sometimes.



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.

vivster said:
Jumpin said:

Another problem with this grid is that authoritarian and libertarian are both loaded terms and not opposites of one another.

Many people take "libertarian" to mean unfettered laissez-faire/neoliberal capitalist economics - which is a fundamentally authoritarian so long as people within those structures depend on wages and insurance plans for survival and are beholden to contracts; a CEO without red tape is therefore no different from a mini-dictator. Anti-authoritarian measures to regulate the power of corporations are also anti-libertarian. Laws which prevent corporate monopolization are also anti-authoritarian and anti-Libertarian.

The opposite of authoritarianism is not libertarianism, it's anarchism.

I think you completely misunderstood authoritarianism. It says right in the name that it's about authority. Authority comes through a governing body and laws. Corporations are not authorities. However libertarianism can lead to authoritarianism when corporations become powerful enough to replace or usurp any other authority. We're not at that dystopian point yet even though it might feel that way sometimes.

I would disagree with this. Corporations are a sort of authority and the small l libertarians of the US are more authoritarian than they think.



Just a guy who doesn't want to be bored. Also

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Eagle367 said:
vivster said:

I think you completely misunderstood authoritarianism. It says right in the name that it's about authority. Authority comes through a governing body and laws. Corporations are not authorities. However libertarianism can lead to authoritarianism when corporations become powerful enough to replace or usurp any other authority. We're not at that dystopian point yet even though it might feel that way sometimes.

I would disagree with this. Corporations are a sort of authority and the small l libertarians of the US are more authoritarian than they think.

Corporations do not possess the kind of authority that is used to define authoritarianism.

US libertarians or the people who call themselves that are a different breed, it doesn't really matter what those authoritarians want to call themselves. I mean they're also calling themselves patriots and we know that isn't true.

Just like how US liberal democrats are barely centrists instead of the leftists they pretend to be or others call them.



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.

vivster said:
Eagle367 said:

I would disagree with this. Corporations are a sort of authority and the small l libertarians of the US are more authoritarian than they think.

Corporations do not possess the kind of authority that is used to define authoritarianism.

US libertarians or the people who call themselves that are a different breed, it doesn't really matter what those authoritarians want to call themselves. I mean they're also calling themselves patriots and we know that isn't true.

Just like how US liberal democrats are barely centrists instead of the leftists they pretend to be or others call them.

I would say the workplace is a very important part of everyday life for many people so they do have the kind of authority on each of their microscales to be authoritarian. Hell they are authoritarian by virtue of their structure aka owner, board, manager, workers, etc. 



Just a guy who doesn't want to be bored. Also

Eagle367 said:
vivster said:

Corporations do not possess the kind of authority that is used to define authoritarianism.

US libertarians or the people who call themselves that are a different breed, it doesn't really matter what those authoritarians want to call themselves. I mean they're also calling themselves patriots and we know that isn't true.

Just like how US liberal democrats are barely centrists instead of the leftists they pretend to be or others call them.

I would say the workplace is a very important part of everyday life for many people so they do have the kind of authority on each of their microscales to be authoritarian. Hell they are authoritarian by virtue of their structure aka owner, board, manager, workers, etc. 

Again, not authoritarian by the political definition. This is about politics, not sociology or philosophy.

If you want to take it broader I could even say my hobbies are authoritarian because I would literally die from depression if I didn't have them, so they are commanding me to do them.



If you demand respect or gratitude for your volunteer work, you're doing volunteering wrong.

I'm centre-left and would you believe this thing place me in centre-left. :)



Hmm, pie.

I'm libertarian as far as believing that as long as they're not harming anyone people should be able to live their lives the way they wish, but I turn authoritarian once folks start trying to harm others, such as bullying, racism, homophobia, inciting violence, etc. Shut that bullshit down.

Last edited by curl-6 - 5 days ago

Bet with Liquidlaser: I say PS5 and Xbox Series will sell more than 56 million combined by the end of 2023.