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Forums - General Discussion - VGC users I can't barely tolerate

gergroy said:
Ka-pi96 said:

That isn't silent...

The w in "sword" is silent though. It's the same as "lord" except with an s.

And don't trust gergroy either. He's not even English!

I do have an English degree though...🤔. There are differences between American and British English though... not too familiar with all the british stuff, maybe you guys just don’t like to pronounce things as they are spelled?

Or you guys don't like to spell things as they are pronounced (eg. spelt)



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Dulfite said:
RolStoppable said:

What was that about having an English degree? If you really have one, then you know that English (whether it's British or American) is just about the worst language when it comes to phonetics. No consistency whatsoever when it comes to vowels.

Can confirm. The language we speak is so confusing when you think about it. I just realized the other day, you know the rule about a or an before a letter? I always heard you do it before vowels, but when I didn't know what you do it before a heard vowel, not a spelled one. For example:

A xylophone. You say a because the x is pronounced without the EX sound.

An X-Ray. You say an because the x sounds like EX.

WHAT KIND OF NONSENSE IS THIS LOL

It's easy Dulfite! X-Ray has X as a standalone letter pronounced as-is, so it's pronounced "EX" and, since its pronunciation starts with a vowel, it's preceded by an "an". Xylophone contains X as part of the syllable "xy", so it sounds like "gzy" and since g is hard it is preceded by an "a".

There is much trickier stuff you can find.

How about the "o" being pronounced differently in the following words:

someone: the o's sound like "u"s as un "fun".

or: the o sounds close to an open "a" as in the first "a" of "altar".

do: the o sounds like an oo sound like in "tooth".

I had fun explaining this to a friend I'm teaching English to. His Russian o's are friendlier than I thought after that lesson.

Last edited by padib - on 23 September 2020

padib said:
Dulfite said:

Can confirm. The language we speak is so confusing when you think about it. I just realized the other day, you know the rule about a or an before a letter? I always heard you do it before vowels, but when I didn't know what you do it before a heard vowel, not a spelled one. For example:

A xylophone. You say a because the x is pronounced without the EX sound.

An X-Ray. You say an because the x sounds like EX.

WHAT KIND OF NONSENSE IS THIS LOL

It's easy Dulfite! X-Ray has X as a standalone letter pronounced as-is, so it's pronounced "EX" and, since its pronunciation starts with a vowel, it's preceded by an "an". Xylophone contains X as part of the syllable "xy", so it sounds like "gzy" and since g is hard it is preceded by "an".

There is much trickier stuff you can find.

How about the "o" being pronounced differently in the following words:

someone: the o's sound like "u"s as un "fun".

or: the o sounds close to an open "a" as in the first "a" of "altar".

do: the o sounds like an oo sound like in "tooth".

I had fun explaining this to a friend I'm teaching English to. His Russian o's are friendlier than I thought after that lesson.

Huh? You said it was easy and then just complicated everything. There's no "g" in Xylophone. It's also not preceded by "an". It's "a xylophone". Even if there were a hard g there, it would still be "a" rather than "an" eg. "a gynaecologist" or "a Ghanaian".

To add on to that, since the "E" in "Europe" is pronounced like a "y" you'd also say "a European", rather than "an European" (the latter just sounds silly ).



Ka-pi96 said:
padib said:

It's easy Dulfite! X-Ray has X as a standalone letter pronounced as-is, so it's pronounced "EX" and, since its pronunciation starts with a vowel, it's preceded by an "an". Xylophone contains X as part of the syllable "xy", so it sounds like "gzy" and since g is hard it is preceded by "an".

There is much trickier stuff you can find.

How about the "o" being pronounced differently in the following words:

someone: the o's sound like "u"s as un "fun".

or: the o sounds close to an open "a" as in the first "a" of "altar".

do: the o sounds like an oo sound like in "tooth".

I had fun explaining this to a friend I'm teaching English to. His Russian o's are friendlier than I thought after that lesson.

Huh? You said it was easy and then just complicated everything. There's no "g" in Xylophone. It's also not preceded by "an". It's "a xylophone". Even if there were a hard g there, it would still be "a" rather than "an" eg. "a gynaecologist" or "a Ghanaian".

To add on to that, since the "E" in "Europe" is pronounced like a "y" you'd also say "a European", rather than "an European" (the latter just sounds silly ).

I'm talking about pronunciation brah. But yeah I made a typo but my point's the same. X-Ray is pronounced with a leading vowel so simply it's preceded by "an", the other one is pronounced with a leading consonant "g" as in "gzy" so it is preceded by an "a". Typo fixed

European is pronounced with a hard "y" so it's preceded by an "a", as in "a young man". To me it's super simple. The other examples I showed are much harder to justify, you kind of just have to memorize those.



padib said:
Ka-pi96 said:

Huh? You said it was easy and then just complicated everything. There's no "g" in Xylophone. It's also not preceded by "an". It's "a xylophone". Even if there were a hard g there, it would still be "a" rather than "an" eg. "a gynaecologist" or "a Ghanaian".

To add on to that, since the "E" in "Europe" is pronounced like a "y" you'd also say "a European", rather than "an European" (the latter just sounds silly ).

I'm talking about pronunciation brah. But yeah I made a typo but my point's the same. X-Ray is pronounced with a leading vowel so simply it's preceded by "an", the other one is pronounced with a leading consonant "g" as in "gzy" so it is preceded by an "a". Typo fixed

European is pronounced with a hard "y" so it's preceded by an "a", as in "a young man". To me it's super simple. The other examples I showed are much harder to justify, you kind of just have to memorize those.

Even in pronunciation it's not gzylophone though, just zylophone. Don't even know how you'd pronounce "gzy" Like "guh-zy"?

Although while we're talking about "x" it seems like the most pointless letter in the alphabet. It could easily be removed and replaced with different letters which would produce the same sounds in the tiny number of words that it even appears in.



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Ka-pi96 said:
padib said:

I'm talking about pronunciation brah. But yeah I made a typo but my point's the same. X-Ray is pronounced with a leading vowel so simply it's preceded by "an", the other one is pronounced with a leading consonant "g" as in "gzy" so it is preceded by an "a". Typo fixed

European is pronounced with a hard "y" so it's preceded by an "a", as in "a young man". To me it's super simple. The other examples I showed are much harder to justify, you kind of just have to memorize those.

Even in pronunciation it's not gzylophone though, just zylophone. Don't even know how you'd pronounce "gzy" Like "guh-zy"?

Although while we're talking about "x" it seems like the most pointless letter in the alphabet. It could easily be removed and replaced with different letters which would produce the same sounds in the tiny number of words that it even appears in.

You need to remember that there are international pronunciation variants. It's subtle , but you'll see that that z is softer in the brittish version.

 https://dictionary.cambridge.org/pronunciation/english/xylophone 

The american version has a harsher zai sound, which could sound like a "gzy" but with a very light g. While both are marked "zai" on google (for pronunciation), the american one sounds different. To go further, I'm Canadian. There is a regional difference here in how we pronounce things, even though we're lumped together with American English in most pronunciation samples. 

"x" is a historical letter which comes from greek and allows words to be spelled (or spelt) similarly to other languages such as French, where the "X" in "xylophone" will really sound like a "gzy", much more than the american pronunciation in English.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RMAd1nQTOyY&ab_channel=Chouettelecture

If you replace it with another letter, you lose that similarity, etymological breadcrumb and the reason why it sounds different in American English as compared to British English.



Im going to add the both off you for being boring about grammer



 "I think people should define the word crap" - Kirby007

Join the Prediction League http://www.vgchartz.com/predictions

Instead of seeking to convince others, we can be open to changing our own minds, and seek out information that contradicts our own steadfast point of view. Maybe it’ll turn out that those who disagree with you actually have a solid grasp of the facts. There’s a slight possibility that, after all, you’re the one who’s wrong.

kirby007 said:
Im going to add the both off you for being boring about grammer

eh, I was probably already on your list for liking PSV Eindhoven anyway. Been wearing my PSV shirt today too



Ka-pi96 said:
kirby007 said:
Im going to add the both off you for being boring about grammer

eh, I was probably already on your list for liking PSV Eindhoven anyway. Been wearing my PSV shirt today too

I cant remember nonsense like that, its like supporting .1 nurnberg way to silly to care or be untolerable of



 "I think people should define the word crap" - Kirby007

Join the Prediction League http://www.vgchartz.com/predictions

Instead of seeking to convince others, we can be open to changing our own minds, and seek out information that contradicts our own steadfast point of view. Maybe it’ll turn out that those who disagree with you actually have a solid grasp of the facts. There’s a slight possibility that, after all, you’re the one who’s wrong.

vivster said:
Mummelmann said:
My level of confusion is higher than OP's post count right now. What's going on in here?

That's not really a high bar now, is it?

Ooh, guess not.