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Forums - Politics Discussion - Question for Confederate Supporters

numberwang said:

Not so bold, beautiful and brave anymore, huh? Weird how that works.

Would you sign this partition? Condemning slavery by Washington and Mohamed. Easy cause, it's about slavery after all.

You can find people with inconsistent views on sliced bread. Doesn't mean OP does on this subject.
And I'd like to think many people are aware that there are no statues of Muhammad. If someone asked me that, I'd know that they're either uneducated, or wasting my time.

Last edited by Hiku - on 06 August 2020

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I'll just leave this here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rf9XfB65J_w





Check this guy out, he used to gives tours at Gettysburg.



OTBWY said:



Check this guy out, he used to gives tours at Gettysburg.

Thanks for that video, will check out his other videos later. Truly interesting and educating.



I'm from England, UK where there is a similar issue. Due to the racist police brutality (in certain parts of America) which caused the death of George floyd, there was a statue of slave trader recently here in England that was removed (and also protests in London happened which targeted other statues). This has caused waves of discussion and debate about other public UK statues with deviant histories.

I believe the best solution is to put these statues in a museum where they can have a context. The environment has the ability to change the context of art, eg; a slave trader standing outside in the sun next to legendary figures such as Royal dynasties, Mother Theresa and Churchill. This would make the context of the statue seam as if the country is meriting the slave trader. Whereas in a museum the statues can have a more controlled historical context eg: there could have a sign next to it for tourists and school kids to read which would describe the guy as a bad and heinous guy and what he did that is infamously wrong to modern society; therefore why the statue of him is on display.

Although, I'm not from America, so I may seam ignorant due to not considering any differences in our countries' issues, including the American Civil War and the mentality (therefore culture) of some 'historians' in the South of US.



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00Xander00 said:

I'm from England, UK where there is a similar issue. Due to the racist police brutality (in certain parts of America) which caused the death of George floyd, there was a statue of slave trader recently here in England that was removed (and also protests in London happened which targeted other statues). This has caused waves of discussion and debate about other public UK statues with deviant histories.

I believe the best solution is to put these statues in a museum where they can have a context. The environment has the ability to change the context of art, eg; a slave trader standing outside in the sun next to legendary figures such as Royal dynasties, Mother Theresa and Churchill. This would make the context of the statue seam as if the country is meriting the slave trader. Whereas in a museum the statues can have a more controlled historical context eg: there could have a sign next to it for tourists and school kids to read which would describe the guy as a bad and heinous guy and what he did that is infamously wrong to modern society; therefore why the statue of him is on display.

Although, I'm not from America, so I may seam ignorant due to not considering any differences in our countries' issues, including the American Civil War and the mentality (therefore culture) of some 'historians' in the South of US.

And that's the problem. Like the video above explains, only a select few museums actually want to have these bulky statues which are difficult to maintain when inside a building (try cleaning such a statue without getting the whole floor drenched in water, for instance)

So my idea would be to put them into a plantation and turn that one into an open-air museum where you can teach about the history of the south, the slavery, and what else they might have been fighting for during the secession. Thar would put plantations into good cultural use instead of using them for weddings...

Last edited by Bofferbrauer2 - on 11 August 2020

Bofferbrauer2 said:
00Xander00 said:

I'm from England, UK where there is a similar issue. Due to the racist police brutality (in certain parts of America) which caused the death of George floyd, there was a statue of slave trader recently here in England that was removed (and also protests in London happened which targeted other statues). This has caused waves of discussion and debate about other public UK statues with deviant histories.

I believe the best solution is to put these statues in a museum where they can have a context. The environment has the ability to change the context of art, eg; a slave trader standing outside in the sun next to legendary figures such as Royal dynasties, Mother Theresa and Churchill. This would make the context of the statue seam as if the country is meriting the slave trader. Whereas in a museum the statues can have a more controlled historical context eg: there could have a sign next to it for tourists and school kids to read which would describe the guy as a bad and heinous guy and what he did that is infamously wrong to modern society; therefore why the statue of him is on display.

Although, I'm not from America, so I may seam ignorant due to not considering any differences in our countries' issues, including the American Civil War and the mentality (therefore culture) of some 'historians' in the South of US.

And that's the problem. Like the video above explains, only a select few museums actually want to have these bulky statues which are difficult to maintain when inside a building (try cleaning such a statue without getting the whole floor drenched in water, for instance)

So my idea would be to put them into a plantation and turn that one into an open-air museum where you can teach about the history of the south, the slavery, and what else they might have been fighting for during the secession. Thar would put plantations into good cultural use instead of using them for weddings...

I actually like this idea. I'd prefer they remain where they are, but better your plan than for them to be vandalized and ruined. And no, I'm not a racist or sexist. But I find the idea of getting rid of history unthinkable.

But then I hear people like Morgan Freeman talk and I can see his point. Maybe racism would go away if we simply ignored the past and stopped talking about what our ancestors did to one another. Maybe we could just forget our way into a society that doesn't belittle, murder, steal from, or demand repartions from each other because of what people did decades/centuries ago that we had no control over.



00Xander00 said:

I'm from England, UK where there is a similar issue. Due to the racist police brutality (in certain parts of America) which caused the death of George floyd, there was a statue of slave trader recently here in England that was removed (and also protests in London happened which targeted other statues). This has caused waves of discussion and debate about other public UK statues with deviant histories.

I believe the best solution is to put these statues in a museum where they can have a context. The environment has the ability to change the context of art, eg; a slave trader standing outside in the sun next to legendary figures such as Royal dynasties, Mother Theresa and Churchill. This would make the context of the statue seam as if the country is meriting the slave trader. Whereas in a museum the statues can have a more controlled historical context eg: there could have a sign next to it for tourists and school kids to read which would describe the guy as a bad and heinous guy and what he did that is infamously wrong to modern society; therefore why the statue of him is on display.

Although, I'm not from America, so I may seam ignorant due to not considering any differences in our countries' issues, including the American Civil War and the mentality (therefore culture) of some 'historians' in the South of US.

There should also be context as to the circumstances under which the statues themselves were created. Most were created decades after the war and many were commissioned by the Daughters of the Confederacy. They were created partly to whitewash the Civil War and paint the false narrative of a noble “Lost Cause” where the Confederates were fighting against tyranny, and partly to make sure Blacks “knew their place.“ So removing them from public spaces is not “destroying history,” as the “history” these statues represent was fraudulent to begin with. 



Dulfite said:
Bofferbrauer2 said:

And that's the problem. Like the video above explains, only a select few museums actually want to have these bulky statues which are difficult to maintain when inside a building (try cleaning such a statue without getting the whole floor drenched in water, for instance)

So my idea would be to put them into a plantation and turn that one into an open-air museum where you can teach about the history of the south, the slavery, and what else they might have been fighting for during the secession. Thar would put plantations into good cultural use instead of using them for weddings...

I actually like this idea. I'd prefer they remain where they are, but better your plan than for them to be vandalized and ruined. And no, I'm not a racist or sexist. But I find the idea of getting rid of history unthinkable.

But then I hear people like Morgan Freeman talk and I can see his point. Maybe racism would go away if we simply ignored the past and stopped talking about what our ancestors did to one another. Maybe we could just forget our way into a society that doesn't belittle, murder, steal from, or demand repartions from each other because of what people did decades/centuries ago that we had no control over.

That would have to go both ways. White Southerners would also have to give up their glorification of the Confederacy and its symbols. 



OTBWY said:



Check this guy out, he used to gives tours at Gettysburg.

This is a fairly great video.



I describe myself as a little dose of toxic masculinity.