Forums - Sony Discussion - PS5 GDC Reveal and PS5 specs/performance Digital Foundry Video analysis : 3.5 Ghz 8 core Zen 2 CPU along with 10.3 TF RDNA 2 RT capable and 16GB GDDR6 RAM and also super crazy fast 5.5 GB/Second S

How do you feel

My brain become bigger su... 21 30.00%
 
I am wet 6 8.57%
 
What did he talked about??? 5 7.14%
 
I want some more info 9 12.86%
 
Total:41
Pemalite said:

1) You made a claim, you have failed to adhere to the burden of proof, thus said claim can be discarded.

2)RAM includes a Serial Presence Detect chip which has an ID tag so that it can communicate with the BIOS to set the appropriate defined memory timings and frequency.

The XMP profile is an extension to that which allows for the DRAM to operate with defined specifications outside of the JEDEC specs.

RAM doesn't include NAND. RAM is RAM. Ram is not NAND.

1) What I said was that overclocking can damage VRAM, yet you are focused and obsessed to make a point based on the generalization of AMD APUs North-bridge limitations, which has nothing to do with the point on hand I was discussing. But ironically I'm gonna put perhaps the gratest proof of all, for you. For example the PS4. In the case of the PS4 system is an AMD APU design, and yet it has been built with a dedicated video memory(GDDDR5), and in reversal it shares the VRAM Pool with the system memory. And before you rant about PS4 not being an APU, here read a little more. Perhaps now you're gonna say I didn't understand you or that im not interpreting correctly, and for that my friend mental hospitals do exist.

2) That is not what I talked about. And yes RAM has NAND. Read here. Also you can read more here. For a computer to be able start and boot properly a ram stick needs to have a SPD module. Basically what this module do is communicating the BIOS the safest timing and frequency under the proper DDR standard and start the PC. This has been like this for ages, and with it requiring manual tweaking in the BIOS for high performance sticks for extra performance if you need it. This changed a bit with the XMP profiles by Intel. With XMP the BIOS can access additional timings and frequencies stored in a 2 pre-arranged profiles within the SPD modules, so the bios can auto adjust these settings without further tweaking just by choosing which. For this to work, the SPD module need to have such data, if not, it will run in standard mode without any auto-tweak. If the extra data in these profiles were to be used as the default SPD info, RAM compatibility will be broken creating a huge problem between motherboard makers and ram manufacturers.

------------

About the PS5

Mark Cerny said he was saving more details for the teardown of the system. Probably if any surprise, it will announced at that moment. Any chance you guys see the launch date being pushed back a few months(4-6) for whatever reason? 

User was moderated for this post. - Pemalite. Last edited by Pemalite - on 05 April 2020

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alexxonne said:

1) What I said was that overclocking can damage VRAM, yet you are focused and obsessed to make a point based on the generalization of AMD APUs North-bridge limitations, which has nothing to do with the point on hand I was discussing. But ironically I'm gonna put perhaps the gratest proof of all, for you. For example the PS4. In the case of the PS4 system is an AMD APU design, and yet it has been built with a dedicated video memory(GDDDR5), and in reversal it shares the VRAM Pool with the system memory. And before you rant about PS4 not being an APU, here read a little more. Perhaps now you're gonna say I didn't understand you or that im not interpreting correctly, and for that my friend mental hospitals do exist.

"can". - Doesn't mean it *will* if done correctly.

Never claimed the PS4's APU wasn't an APU... So that point you are making is irrelevant.

Also... That isn't what VRAM is. That is GDDR5 Ram.

Video Ram is actually a type of RAM and hasn't been used in years... Granted I am playing with semantics, obviously we are talking about dedicated graphics memory which is of the GDDR variant.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_RAM_(dual-ported_DRAM)

In saying that, PC notebooks and desktop AMD APU's do not have a memory controller that supports GDDR5/6 memory.

alexxonne said:

2) That is not what I talked about. And yes RAM has NAND. Read here. Also you can read more here. For a computer to be able start and boot properly a ram stick needs to have a SPD module. Basically what this module do is communicating the BIOS the safest timing and frequency under the proper DDR standard and start the PC. This has been like this for ages, and with it requiring manual tweaking in the BIOS for high performance sticks for extra performance if you need it. This changed a bit with the XMP profiles by Intel. With XMP the BIOS can access additional timings and frequencies stored in a 2 pre-arranged profiles within the SPD modules, so the bios can auto adjust these settings without further tweaking just by choosing which. For this to work, the SPD module need to have such data, if not, it will run in standard mode without any auto-tweak. If the extra data in these profiles were to be used as the default SPD info, RAM compatibility will be broken creating a huge problem between motherboard makers and ram manufacturers.

The framed context of your statements made it sound like you were asserting that RAM is NAND. They are separate entities... Different technologies. - And that memory stick doesn't change that.

Those sticks are server products, not consumer commodity sticks anyway. Again, redundant.

alexxonne said:

About the PS5

Mark Cerny said he was saving more details for the teardown of the system. Probably if any surprise, it will announced at that moment. Any chance you guys see the launch date being pushed back a few months(4-6) for whatever reason? 

Doesn't bother me if they even do delay it.



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

Pemalite said:

1) Granted I am playing with semantics, obviously we are talking about dedicated graphics memory which is of the GDDR variant.

2) The framed context of your statements made it sound like you were asserting that RAM is NAND. They are separate entities... Different technologies.

Those sticks are server products, not consumer commodity sticks anyway. Again, redundant.

1) Exactly my point. But the wikipedia article is not accurate. Here is a better and accurate reference. GDDR is just another type of VRAM. Here is a nice video.

2) Your #1 response, answers this one. I'm not talking exclusively on consumer devices.  Most custom, enterprise and consumer devices are a whole ecosystem to me and I don't necessary distinguish between them when talking terms. But semantics wise, I meant the memory. So, you're deviating just to argue.

Last edited by alexxonne - on 05 April 2020

I wonder if I can play 4k 60fps with a 4k tv with HDMI 2.0



Ryotsu said:
I wonder if I can play 4k 60fps with a 4k tv with HDMI 2.0

https://www.extron.com/article/hdmi2faq

Yes, base HDMI 2.0 supports 4K/60



Stop hate, let others live the life they were given. Everyone has their problems, and no one should have to feel ashamed for the way they were born. Be proud of who you are, encourage others to be proud of themselves. Learn, research, absorb everything around you. Nothing is meaningless, a purpose is placed on everything no matter how you perceive it. Discover how to love, and share that love with everything that you encounter. Help make existence a beautiful thing.

Kevyn B Grams
10/03/2010 

KBG29 on PSN&XBL

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KBG29 said:
Ryotsu said:
I wonder if I can play 4k 60fps with a 4k tv with HDMI 2.0

https://www.extron.com/article/hdmi2faq

Yes, base HDMI 2.0 supports 4K/60

wat if my TV supports 120 at 1080P. Could I play Dirt 5 (that's the new one?) in the 120 mode the game supports?