By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Close

Forums - Sony Discussion - PS5 GDC Reveal and PS5 specs/performance Digital Foundry Video analysis : 3.5 Ghz 8 core Zen 2 CPU along with 10.3 TF RDNA 2 RT capable and 16GB GDDR6 RAM and also super crazy fast 5.5 GB/Second S

 

How do you feel

My brain become bigger su... 21 30.00%
 
I am wet 6 8.57%
 
What did he talked about??? 5 7.14%
 
I want some more info 9 12.86%
 
Total:41
Pemalite said:

1) You will need to provide a citation of those systems with an AMD APU with dedicated graphics memory.

2) You can modify a BIOS.

3) RAM can have profiles.

1) I don't need to. You are purposely deviating from what I meant at the beginning, and going full circle. So there is not point. You are only focused in consumer platforms for PC. Enterprise platforms and custom platforms solutions are different.

2) I Already said so.

3) Not profiles. ID tags so they can be identified just like CPU codes are verified during boot by the BIOS, currently this is non-existent. RAM sticks use a FPGA controller for compatibility based on the NAND speed and socket target. If given and id tag or code, it will probably provoke costs to go way higher with the testing across infinite devices, wil require new socket profiles/pinouts for the ID module integration and it will not provide any real benefit to the standard consumer. RAM sticks are built based on specifications. The motherboards(bios) usually just check if the ram complies with those, and adjust timing accordingly, after 1st boot.

----

Like you said earlier, if you don't give a shit, why should I? Move on.

----

Going back to the main topic, there were rumors about PS5 overheating. While the rumors are probably fake (Jeff Rickel) I will be neutral on this just to be fair for the sake of the argument. Accordingly to Cerny, the way PS5 is being built is with a specific power level that will be linear to the capabilities to the cooling solution, reducing drastically the thermal load spike under heavy processing that occurs in ordinary platforms, by changing the frequency and not the voltage. By having an specific power level, the cooling solution will work as intended in all game scenarios independently from workload they can provoke. At least he was very clear in that aspect and while he hasn't revealed yet the cooling solution, if memory serves me right he mentioned that it was also to maintain the system as silent possible preventing the fan speed from changing so much. In addition to that there were reports from the stock market analysts, stating that the cooling solution selected for the PS5 was more robust and costlier than previous consoles. With the PS5 specs already revealed, the cooling solution surely was designed entirely to manage such high frequencies in the RDNA2 architecture. The only aspect that could be giving Sony a problem is the additional heat coming from the SSD solution, while it can be true I don't really think it would be such hurdle. If SSD is really increasing heat inside  the console, then it just need to be relocated or isolated. Another way is to add heatsinks and use a separate airflow for it, nothing special or complicated for a company as Sony. So, in my opinion the rumor is just utterly nonsense to me.

Last edited by alexxonne - on 04 April 2020

Around the Network
alexxonne said:
Pemalite said:

1) You will need to provide a citation of those systems with an AMD APU with dedicated graphics memory.

2) You can modify a BIOS.

3) RAM can have profiles.

1) I don't need to. You are purposely deviating from what I meant at the beginning, and going full circle. So there is not point. You are only focused in consumer platforms for PC. Enterprise platforms and custom platforms solutions are different.

2) I Already said so.

3) Not profiles. ID tags so they can be identified just like CPU codes are verified during boot by the BIOS, currently this is non-existent. RAM sticks use a FPGA controller for compatibility based on the NAND speed and socket target. If given and id tag or code, it will probably provoke costs to go way higher with the testing across infinite devices, wil require new socket profiles/pinouts for the ID module integration and it will not provide any real benefit to the standard consumer. RAM sticks are built based on specifications. The motherboards(bios) usually just check if the ram complies with those, and adjust timing accordingly, after 1st boot.

----

Like you said earlier, if you don't give a shit, why should I? Move on.

----

Going back to the main topic, there were rumors about PS5 overheating. While the rumors are probably fake (Jeff Rickel) I will be neutral on this just to be fair for the sake of the argument. Accordingly to Cerny, the way PS5 is being built is with a specific power level that will be linear to the capabilities to the cooling solution, reducing drastically the thermal load spike under heavy processing that occurs in ordinary platforms, by changing the frequency and not the voltage. By having an specific power level, the cooling solution will work as intended in all game scenarios independently from workload they can provoke. At least he was very clear in that aspect and while he hasn't revealed yet the cooling solution, if memory serves me right he mentioned that it was also to maintain the system as silent possible preventing the fan speed from changing so much. In addition to that there were reports from the stock market analysts, stating that the cooling solution selected for the PS5 was more robust and costlier than previous consoles. With the PS5 specs already revealed, the cooling solution surely was designed entirely to manage such high frequencies in the RDNA2 architecture. The only aspect that could be giving Sony a problem is the additional heat coming from the SSD solution, while it can be true I don't really think it would be such hurdle. If SSD is really increasing heat inside  the console, then it just need to be relocated or isolated. Another way is to add heatsinks and use a separate airflow for it, nothing special or complicated for a company as Sony. So, in my opinion the rumor is just utterly nonsense to me.

Yep, the rumor makes no sense. The design philosophy of PS5 seems like not overheating was a higher priority than making the system powerful.  Not to mention, the person starting the rumor has often started nonsense rumors. Like claiming that PlayStation was doing so poorly in 2017, that they were going to have to start selling studios.  



alexxonne said:

1) I don't need to. You are purposely deviating from what I meant at the beginning, and going full circle. So there is not point. You are only focused in consumer platforms for PC. Enterprise platforms and custom platforms solutions are different.

You made a claim, you have failed to adhere to the burden of proof, thus said claim can be discarded.

alexxonne said:

3) Not profiles. ID tags so they can be identified just like CPU codes are verified during boot by the BIOS, currently this is non-existent. RAM sticks use a FPGA controller for compatibility based on the NAND speed and socket target. If given and id tag or code, it will probably provoke costs to go way higher with the testing across infinite devices, wil require new socket profiles/pinouts for the ID module integration and it will not provide any real benefit to the standard consumer. RAM sticks are built based on specifications. The motherboards(bios) usually just check if the ram complies with those, and adjust timing accordingly, after 1st boot.

RAM includes a Serial Presence Detect chip which has an ID tag so that it can communicate with the BIOS to set the appropriate defined memory timings and frequency.

The XMP profile is an extension to that which allows for the DRAM to operate with defined specifications outside of the JEDEC specs.

RAM doesn't include NAND. RAM is RAM. Ram is not NAND.

alexxonne said:

Going back to the main topic, there were rumors about PS5 overheating. While the rumors are probably fake (Jeff Rickel) I will be neutral on this just to be fair for the sake of the argument. Accordingly to Cerny, the way PS5 is being built is with a specific power level that will be linear to the capabilities to the cooling solution, reducing drastically the thermal load spike under heavy processing that occurs in ordinary platforms, by changing the frequency and not the voltage. By having an specific power level, the cooling solution will work as intended in all game scenarios independently from workload they can provoke. At least he was very clear in that aspect and while he hasn't revealed yet the cooling solution, if memory serves me right he mentioned that it was also to maintain the system as silent possible preventing the fan speed from changing so much. In addition to that there were reports from the stock market analysts, stating that the cooling solution selected for the PS5 was more robust and costlier than previous consoles. With the PS5 specs already revealed, the cooling solution surely was designed entirely to manage such high frequencies in the RDNA2 architecture. The only aspect that could be giving Sony a problem is the additional heat coming from the SSD solution, while it can be true I don't really think it would be such hurdle. If SSD is really increasing heat inside  the console, then it just need to be relocated or isolated. Another way is to add heatsinks and use a separate airflow for it, nothing special or complicated for a company as Sony. So, in my opinion the rumor is just utterly nonsense to me.

Yeah. Grain of salt and all that until it can be proven.

There are far to many rumors, not enough evidence when it comes to the speculation of hardware in the console space... And it's droll.



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

It's only as good as the game engine being used, and how well optimised it is.



Pemalite said:

1) You made a claim, you have failed to adhere to the burden of proof, thus said claim can be discarded.

2)RAM includes a Serial Presence Detect chip which has an ID tag so that it can communicate with the BIOS to set the appropriate defined memory timings and frequency.

The XMP profile is an extension to that which allows for the DRAM to operate with defined specifications outside of the JEDEC specs.

RAM doesn't include NAND. RAM is RAM. Ram is not NAND.

1) What I said was that overclocking can damage VRAM, yet you are focused and obsessed to make a point based on the generalization of AMD APUs North-bridge limitations, which has nothing to do with the point on hand I was discussing. But ironically I'm gonna put perhaps the gratest proof of all, for you. For example the PS4. In the case of the PS4 system is an AMD APU design, and yet it has been built with a dedicated video memory(GDDDR5), and in reversal it shares the VRAM Pool with the system memory. And before you rant about PS4 not being an APU, here read a little more. Perhaps now you're gonna say I didn't understand you or that im not interpreting correctly, and for that my friend mental hospitals do exist.

2) That is not what I talked about. And yes RAM has NAND. Read here. Also you can read more here. For a computer to be able start and boot properly a ram stick needs to have a SPD module. Basically what this module do is communicating the BIOS the safest timing and frequency under the proper DDR standard and start the PC. This has been like this for ages, and with it requiring manual tweaking in the BIOS for high performance sticks for extra performance if you need it. This changed a bit with the XMP profiles by Intel. With XMP the BIOS can access additional timings and frequencies stored in a 2 pre-arranged profiles within the SPD modules, so the bios can auto adjust these settings without further tweaking just by choosing which. For this to work, the SPD module need to have such data, if not, it will run in standard mode without any auto-tweak. If the extra data in these profiles were to be used as the default SPD info, RAM compatibility will be broken creating a huge problem between motherboard makers and ram manufacturers.

------------

About the PS5

Mark Cerny said he was saving more details for the teardown of the system. Probably if any surprise, it will announced at that moment. Any chance you guys see the launch date being pushed back a few months(4-6) for whatever reason? 

User was moderated for this post. - Pemalite. Last edited by Pemalite - on 05 April 2020

Around the Network
alexxonne said:

1) What I said was that overclocking can damage VRAM, yet you are focused and obsessed to make a point based on the generalization of AMD APUs North-bridge limitations, which has nothing to do with the point on hand I was discussing. But ironically I'm gonna put perhaps the gratest proof of all, for you. For example the PS4. In the case of the PS4 system is an AMD APU design, and yet it has been built with a dedicated video memory(GDDDR5), and in reversal it shares the VRAM Pool with the system memory. And before you rant about PS4 not being an APU, here read a little more. Perhaps now you're gonna say I didn't understand you or that im not interpreting correctly, and for that my friend mental hospitals do exist.

"can". - Doesn't mean it *will* if done correctly.

Never claimed the PS4's APU wasn't an APU... So that point you are making is irrelevant.

Also... That isn't what VRAM is. That is GDDR5 Ram.

Video Ram is actually a type of RAM and hasn't been used in years... Granted I am playing with semantics, obviously we are talking about dedicated graphics memory which is of the GDDR variant.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_RAM_(dual-ported_DRAM)

In saying that, PC notebooks and desktop AMD APU's do not have a memory controller that supports GDDR5/6 memory.

alexxonne said:

2) That is not what I talked about. And yes RAM has NAND. Read here. Also you can read more here. For a computer to be able start and boot properly a ram stick needs to have a SPD module. Basically what this module do is communicating the BIOS the safest timing and frequency under the proper DDR standard and start the PC. This has been like this for ages, and with it requiring manual tweaking in the BIOS for high performance sticks for extra performance if you need it. This changed a bit with the XMP profiles by Intel. With XMP the BIOS can access additional timings and frequencies stored in a 2 pre-arranged profiles within the SPD modules, so the bios can auto adjust these settings without further tweaking just by choosing which. For this to work, the SPD module need to have such data, if not, it will run in standard mode without any auto-tweak. If the extra data in these profiles were to be used as the default SPD info, RAM compatibility will be broken creating a huge problem between motherboard makers and ram manufacturers.

The framed context of your statements made it sound like you were asserting that RAM is NAND. They are separate entities... Different technologies. - And that memory stick doesn't change that.

Those sticks are server products, not consumer commodity sticks anyway. Again, redundant.

alexxonne said:

About the PS5

Mark Cerny said he was saving more details for the teardown of the system. Probably if any surprise, it will announced at that moment. Any chance you guys see the launch date being pushed back a few months(4-6) for whatever reason? 

Doesn't bother me if they even do delay it.



--::{PC Gaming Master Race}::--

Pemalite said:

1) Granted I am playing with semantics, obviously we are talking about dedicated graphics memory which is of the GDDR variant.

2) The framed context of your statements made it sound like you were asserting that RAM is NAND. They are separate entities... Different technologies.

Those sticks are server products, not consumer commodity sticks anyway. Again, redundant.

1) Exactly my point. But the wikipedia article is not accurate. Here is a better and accurate reference. GDDR is just another type of VRAM. Here is a nice video.

2) Your #1 response, answers this one. I'm not talking exclusively on consumer devices.  Most custom, enterprise and consumer devices are a whole ecosystem to me and I don't necessary distinguish between them when talking terms. But semantics wise, I meant the memory. So, you're deviating just to argue.

Last edited by alexxonne - on 05 April 2020

I wonder if I can play 4k 60fps with a 4k tv with HDMI 2.0



Ryotsu said:
I wonder if I can play 4k 60fps with a 4k tv with HDMI 2.0

https://www.extron.com/article/hdmi2faq

Yes, base HDMI 2.0 supports 4K/60



Stop hate, let others live the life they were given. Everyone has their problems, and no one should have to feel ashamed for the way they were born. Be proud of who you are, encourage others to be proud of themselves. Learn, research, absorb everything around you. Nothing is meaningless, a purpose is placed on everything no matter how you perceive it. Discover how to love, and share that love with everything that you encounter. Help make existence a beautiful thing.

Kevyn B Grams
10/03/2010 

KBG29 on PSN&XBL

KBG29 said:
Ryotsu said:
I wonder if I can play 4k 60fps with a 4k tv with HDMI 2.0

https://www.extron.com/article/hdmi2faq

Yes, base HDMI 2.0 supports 4K/60

wat if my TV supports 120 at 1080P. Could I play Dirt 5 (that's the new one?) in the 120 mode the game supports?