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Forums - General Discussion - White Girl Wears Chinese Prom Dress - Outrage Commences

contestgamer said:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/05/01/chinese-prom-dress-draws-rage-but-utah-student-said-she-meant-no-harm/567846002/

Cultural appropriation... Anyone here bothered by this?

I would say that the people angry/bothered about this are having prejudice in thinking that only Chinese people can use a dress like that.   Ironical how "all the progress" is just making people going in circles.



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donathos said:
the-pi-guy said:

@bold: I'd accuse anybody of anything that they've done.  If a black person is being racist, I call it out.  If a white person is being racist, I call it out.  

If a male is being misogynist, I call it out.  If a female is being misandrist, I call it out.  

Apologies for butting in, but this jumped out at me.

I applaud your personal consistency. It is worth noting, however, that currently one of the "progressive" talking points is that "black people cannot be racist," and so forth. This is one of the reason why -- as a life-long liberal -- I cannot side with the current "progressive" or "politically correct" or "SJW" movement.

I know some of these attitudes are present in some Liberals.  It's frustrating.  

 

Depending on where you go, it can be nonexistent or overly prevalent.  It used to be very prevalent on Neogaf.  I'd routinely see comments like "f*** white people" and they get a pass, but say anything that someone magically twists into being derogatory about black people and you might see a permaban.  

That was the biggest thing I hated about Neogaf.  Resetera (the new Neogaf) has gone a long way to ban racism against white people.  In fact I've seen more posters banned for white racism than black racism.



This article feels pretty fakeish. Some low-grade twitter hobo yelled some stuff and nothing in the real world happened.



Nymeria said:
Mnementh said:

I conclude from what you write, you have native american heritage. And really, it is a shame that these cultures were destroyed. It says all, that today "native americans" are grouped together, as if it was one culture, while in reality it was many different. The same is true for africa, we often group that together, but before europeans destroyed the native cultures there existed a lot of different kingdoms.

And this all is a loss for all of humanity in reality. A diverse and rich cultural heritage is a big boon. Modern cultural products can rely on that. Movies, music, books and even games. Look alone how God of War forms a cultural heritage that wasn't destroyed into a great game. There are cultures that are not existing anymore, but their heritage is in parts intact. Take Babylon, Sumer, Ur. The Gilgamesh-myth is still known today. How many myths like that are now lost forever, because american and african cultures were destroyed?

And it should be more in our minds how badly american and african people were treated. We have in germany a culture of remembering what we did to jews, roma, gay people and communists. School classes have days they travel to the former KZs and learn what happened there. Do similar things happen for native americans and africans? I think we should all be aware of the crimes our ancestors commited. Not to feel guilty (I was and I am no Nazi), but to learn from it and learn to avoid similar things happen in the future.

I do, can still see it in my father and me as have naturally darker skin and hair.  Sadly, when my great grandmother was adopted she was taught to give up her culture as it was thought it was best to modernize and make them more European. 

I would caution saying they were destroyed. This creates the idea that the tribes are a relic of the past no longer present.  They are still around, and still struggling.  There was a big issue last year in the Dakotas when a pipeline was redirected away from the city and went across native land.  The local tribes protested fearing the damage it would do to places they feel are sacred.  They failed, the pipeline was built, and it had a leak causing environmental damage. Sadly this doesn't get much attention in the national media because those on the periphery become invisible.

I think people associate guilt and blame when they shouldn't.  Americans have an intense desire to be "good guys" that we struggle coming to terms when we fail to live up to our lofty ideals.  We don't talk about even recent history of interfering in elections or supporting tyrants.  We get very uncomfortable, so we prefer ignorance.  This is what leads to many mindsets about how "We're Number One!".  It isn't to condemn us, I love my country and love living here, but I think we can confront our faults and strive to be better, otherwise we have no context for our society or the world.

Yes, you're right, many tribes still exist and struggle to keep the culture. Still, some tribes are actually extinct and even for the still existing tribes, a lot of the cultural heritage is lost. Which is a shame.

Anyway, I hope the US finds it way to accept the culture of the native americans into their general culture. This could help to define a very own american national identity. So far the US seems to be mostly a european culture. I bet in school you all learn Shakespeare and ancient greek history. If you would also learn american history before 1500 and native art, it probably would already change the understanding of your own nation. Do you have classes at school/college to learn native american languages? I guess there are classes for spanish, french or italian.

I agree with you on the guilt and shame thing. The problem herein probably is the the black-and-white thinking. Nobody is singularly "good" or "bad". Another thing is, that I get the feeling, that citizens of the US often very strongly identify with their nation. That's a thing that can change. We in germany often criticize our government or our foreign policy, if we don't agree. That doesn't mean we don't feel as germans or want to live elsewhere. It is hard enough to take responsibility for my own actions, it is often not easy to see my own faults and admit them. Doing the same for my country is impossible. I see myself as an own person in the country, the course of the whole is defined by 80 million people and I can clearly say I don't stand behind EVERYTHING my country does. So a 'my country is #1' mindset looks for me very much like something to avoid pondering consequences or ethical implications. I might be wrong, but it seems for me that way.



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This is like the biggest non issue I have ever seen. Doesn't warrant discussion or even this post, yet here I am.



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vivster said:
Shouldn't people be a lot more concerned about the dudes in the back trying to be black?

Both the girls and guys poses are references to H3H3 group on youtube. 

The girls are doing the papa bless meme, that makes fun of papa murpheys.

The guys are doing VN for vape nation, making fun of that.



LiquorandGunFun said:
EricHiggin said:

Speaking of business, there are A LOT of cultures/religions/races that have adopted suits while doing business, weddings, social events, or even simply just going about their day. I guess everyone in the West should be appalled by this and should get on social media and demand they stop wearing them altogether. How dare they take someone's idea and modify it to fit their needs without being 100% true to the original idea!

I dont care what they want, its called freedom here in the USA.

If this was a gay guy this would not be an issue.

it shouldnt be an issue at all. there are so much more to life than being fashion police.

I was being sarcastic and agree with you. If she was using the dress to purposely make fun of the Chinese culture, then yes, that would be a problem. The fact she's wearing it because it's a pretty dress and fits the tasteful American version of the occasion, is no different than a Chinese man or woman wearing a business suit, pretty much no matter what their doing, even if it's not business, because it's just a suit. There is nothing saying a business suit can only be worn by western cultures and that anyone else who dares wear one must follow certain specific western rules and guidelines while doing so. Same goes for the dress. It's not like she's purely a civilian and wore a military uniform or something like that.



this is not right wing but far left sjw territory



That is just one of the more reasons I don't even care when left wing demonize me, say I'm stupid or any other moronic name calling to say I'm different than them.

Each of those events make me feel less worried of they calling me "far right" just because I couldn't care less to their problematization.



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http://gamrconnect.vgchartz.com/post.php?id=8808363

Mr Puggsly: "Hehe, I said good profit. You said big profit. Frankly, not losing money is what I meant by good. Don't get hung up on semantics"

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 Source NYT


When the furor reached Asia, though, many seemed to be scratching their heads. Far from being critical of Ms. Daum, who is not Chinese, many people in mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan proclaimed her choice of the traditional high-necked dress as a victory for Chinese culture.

“I am very proud to have our culture recognized by people in other countries,” said someone called Snail Trail, commenting on a post of the Utah episode by a popular account on WeChat, the messaging and social media platform, that had been read more than 100,000 times.

“It’s ridiculous to criticize this as cultural appropriation,” Zhou Yijun, a Hong Kong-based cultural commentator, said in a telephone interview. “From the perspective of a Chinese person, if a foreign woman wears a qipao and thinks she looks pretty, then why shouldn’t she wear it?”

 

Just another example of...