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Forums - Nintendo Discussion - A Biased Review Reloaded - Radiant Historia: Perfect Chronology - The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild in Review One Year Later

RolStoppable said:

think-man refused to buy me stuff, so the best I can do would be reviews of the PS1 games that I have somewhere. Do people still care about Gran Turismo 2? Last I heard, even Sony's higher-ups talk down on it.

So think-man ended up buying you a PS4? :P



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Review this next : https://youtu.be/Xc0EzLc7NZg

Such a special thing : D



RolStoppable said:
mjk45 said:

Great Horizon review Rol,  didn't see it mentioned in your review, but since I personally found it detracted from the games visuals I would inquire about your thoughts on all that in game icon clutter .

I like your critique  formula and so have  a request I would look forward to and greatly appreciate you doing a review on Persona 5 if possible.

I thought the icon clutter was beneficial because the visuals don't highlight items you can interact with and otherwise they would blend in too much with the rest of the graphics.

There won't be a Persona 5 review.

morenoingrato said:
Did you buy a PS4?
I like how the headline is the RE7 review, but the big story here is the HZD review.

I am not a traitor.

A simple way of doing it is to make them highlight when your either close or move over them.



Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle (Switch)

This crossover between Nintendo's Mario and Ubisoft's Rabbids defied all expectations. It was a clever marketing strategy to keep this game a secret and unveil it only once it was close to completion to curbstomp all the predictable negativity. The result is a turn-based strategy game with guns and it does indeed work surprisingly well. The eight playable characters are Mario, Luigi, Peach, Yoshi and four Rabbids versions of the aformentioned cast. Mario serves as the typical allrounder with balanced stats and abilities, Luigi takes on the appropriate cowardly role of the sniper, Peach has interesting healing and defense properties, Yoshi is equipped with his trademark ground pound. The Rabbids come largely with different combinations of guns, subweapons and abilities, but each one of them also possesses their own unique traits.

The singe-player campaign makes you control a party of three and Mario is locked into it at all times. That's only a minor annoyance because Mario does fit into any party, but an unlock option would have still been welcome. Depending on which characters you put into your party, your strategy has to be adjusted accordingly. For example, on one hand you have someone like Luigi who must be kept out of harm's way due to his low HP, on the other hand you have Rabbid Mario who must go full assault with his two short range weapons. Since skill points are given to new party members retro-actively, they can be instantly swapped in without any disadvantages to the player. That's good; what isn't, is that there aren't enough skill points to max out all abilities. Likewise, the money you earn isn't even remotely close to enough to buy all weapons for all characters.

The above are two problems that could have been fixed with the multiplayer campaign, but completion of those stages doesn't net any rewards in form of money or skill points. It's also baffling that multiplayer is mandatory for these separate challenges, so if you are alone, you have to play a turn-based game with two controllers. The only positive here is that every Switch comes with two controllers by default, but still... a bad design choice by the developers. The practical worth of a co-op campaign in a turn-based game comes down to what you talk about with your partner, namely the strategies you can come up with and what you decide to go with.

The flow of the single-player campaign is good. It's constantly a mix between battles and short segments of exploration in the loosest sense. While most of the treasure chests hold items for the art gallery, some do contain additional skill points. The completion of each world unlocks a new ability to explore previously unreachable areas, plus a series of challenges that net extra money and skill points. While the campaign doesn't feature any surprises, the constantly growing pool of abilities and options keeps the motivation high. Also, each chapter features a ranking that encourages you to finish battles in as few turns as possible while everyone stays alive.

Mario + Rabbids is a game that had me pondering if it's a 7 or an 8 all the way through. Ultimately I went with the lower score because buying all weapons isn't feasible without hours of tedious money grinding and because the multiplayer is too half-baked. The multiplayer allows you to take all unlocked characters, weapons and skills from the single-player campaign, but on the flipside this means that you will be severely overpowered for many battles. It would have been better if the multiplayer maps were more self-contained and put a limit on the weapons you can use.

Controls 10 There's not much that can be done wrong in a turn-based
game and Mario + Rabbids doesn't commit any mistakes.
Gameplay   Turn-based strategy game with eight distinct playable
characters that allow for very different strategies.
Story   The cringe-worthy intro aside, Mario + Rabbids scores
with a lot of humor and funny animations.
Single-player   Four worlds to conquer, interesting skill trees and a lot of
weapons. Unfortunately, money is in short supply.
Multiplayer   Co-op with two teams of two characters in three difficulties.
Serviceable, but it feels tacked on.
Graphics   Colorful and detailed with occasional framerate drops.
Close-ups can result in unintentional slow motion.
Sound   The music is fitting for all given locations, but it doesn't
reach the heights of other Mario soundtracks.
Value   15 hours to finish the campaign, another 15 to complete
all challenges and find all goodies. Separate multiplayer maps.
Replay Value   Using different characters changes things up, but it doesn't
feel fresh anymore. Cutscenes need to be watched at least once.
Score 7 Mario + Rabbids is a crossover that turned out better than anyone
expected, but that doesn't yield a bonus point in the review score.


Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Shipments

Nice review as always. I'm currently on world 2 and I'm still surprised on how well this crossover works. About the weapon issue you mentioned, as far as I can tell weapons are divides in "tiers", each one more expensive than the previous one. The difference seems to be the elemental damage. I feel that the game forces you to choose which elemental damage do you want to play with. I know that it's a low point if you want to collect every weapon, but my questions are... Does this count on the completion rate? And is it possible to have at least one weapon for each tier with every character without a lot of grinding? Also, I find the game more challenging than expected, how about the challenges' difficulty?



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Only a "7" for the GREATEST crossover of all time ?!!

I call this witchcraft !!

P.S. Good job on your review ;)



Switch Friend Code : 3905-6122-2909 

Volterra_90 said:
Nice review as always. I'm currently on world 2 and I'm still surprised on how well this crossover works. About the weapon issue you mentioned, as far as I can tell weapons are divides in "tiers", each one more expensive than the previous one. The difference seems to be the elemental damage. I feel that the game forces you to choose which elemental damage do you want to play with. I know that it's a low point if you want to collect every weapon, but my questions are...

1. Does this count on the completion rate?
2. And is it possible to have at least one weapon for each tier with every character without a lot of grinding?
3. Also, I find the game more challenging than expected, how about the challenges' difficulty?

Indeed, you have to make a choice which elemental damage you want to have for your main and subweapons, because there's simply not enough money to go around.

1. No.

2. Barely at best, and only after the fact. In general, you first have to be sure which characters you want to play with and then buy new weapons only for those three. There is commonly a little excess money to swap in one other character with a good set of weapons, but being prepared with the best equipment for all characters at all times isn't possible. After you've completed everything and bought the ultimate weapons for everyone, there is money left to buy another 15-30 weapons. You can try to use that to buy a weapon from every tier for every character and see how far you get.

3. The challenges have a displayed difficulty that applies to the scenario "as soon as they are available", meaning that if you save them for later, the actual difficulty drops significantly. At the very end only the world 4 challenges and the four ultimate challenges will have appropriately described difficulty, so almost all challenges found in world 1 to 3 should be a piece of cake.



Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Shipments

RolStoppable said:

Volterra_90 said:
Nice review as always. I'm currently on world 2 and I'm still surprised on how well this crossover works. About the weapon issue you mentioned, as far as I can tell weapons are divides in "tiers", each one more expensive than the previous one. The difference seems to be the elemental damage. I feel that the game forces you to choose which elemental damage do you want to play with. I know that it's a low point if you want to collect every weapon, but my questions are...

1. Does this count on the completion rate?
2. And is it possible to have at least one weapon for each tier with every character without a lot of grinding?
3. Also, I find the game more challenging than expected, how about the challenges' difficulty?

Indeed, you have to make a choice which elemental damage you want to have for your main and subweapons, because there's simply not enough money to go around.

1. No.

2. Barely at best, and only after the fact. In general, you first have to be sure which characters you want to play with and then buy new weapons only for those three. There is commonly a little excess money to swap in one other character with a good set of weapons, but being prepared with the best equipment for all characters at all times isn't possible. After you've completed everything and bought the ultimate weapons for everyone, there is money left to buy another 15-30 weapons. You can try to use that to buy a weapon from every tier for every character and see how far you get.

3. The challenges have a displayed difficulty that applies to the scenario "as soon as they are available", meaning that if you save them for later, the actual difficulty drops significantly. At the very end only the world 4 challenges and the four ultimate challenges will have appropriately described difficulty, so almost all challenges found in world 1 to 3 should be a piece of cake.

OK, thanks! I'm not really good at this game, I tried the "very easy" challenge in world 1 and I couldn't beat it. I felt a bit bad about it XD. But I think I'm getting better since I got Rabbid Mario. I just love his close-ranged attacks. Actually, I'm doing far better with a Rabbid Mario - Mario - Luigi team.



Metroid: Samus Returns (3DS)

It has been seven years since the last Metroid game was released, so naturally there is a lot of demand for a new installment. What we get here is a remake of the Game Boy game Metroid II: Return of Samus, developed by Mercury Steam who had the honor to run Castlevania into the ground. It is certainly an odd choice by Nintendo to trust such people enough to bring Metroid back to glory after the disastrous Other M. Where the Castlevania game for 3DS failed is that it tried to move elements from 3D games into a 2D game, so it was kinda like a God of War in 2D with long and drawn out enemy encounters. It doesn't come as much of a surprise that Samus Returns incorporates more elaborate puzzles or pseudo-puzzles similar to what is found in the Metroid Prime games. What works in 3D isn't necessarily fun in 2D. These things were fine in the Prime trilogy because the games were much slower to begin with. In a 2D game you only get slowed down.

The introduction of Aeion powers falls in a similar category. Before I get to them, I want to note that these powers are selected with the d-pad which means that the Circle Pad controls Samus. Gone are the days of ultra-precise movement, so bumping into stuff you don't want to or facing in the wrong direction when trying to crouch are common occurences. The sole benefit you get from analog controls is 360° aiming while holding the L button to stand still. While many players gush about this because it allows more precise aiming, I can only shake my head because this precise aiming wouldn't be needed if I could move Samus around with high accuracy. What you ultimately get in Samus Returns is the inverse of what we got in Other M: Analog controls in a 2D sidescroller are just as mindboggling as d-pad controls in a 3D space.

The first Aeion power allows you to reveal a portion of the map and nearby breakable blocks. The developers didn't shy away from using this power as an excuse for unintuitive level design, so you commonly find yourself using the power because it's not clear if there could be a path somewhere. The second power feels inspired by Halo, so you can use your Aeion bar as a shield gauge that only depletes upon hits. Enemies hit so hard in this game that I died quite a few times because I refused to fall back on such a cheap mechanic. The third power increases the efficiency of your beam which I consider pure annoyance because this is an IP where you already upgrade your beam through other means. The fourth power slows down time which is all about crossing paths with quickly breaking blocks, something that the Speed Booster accomplished in other installments.

All this sounds very negative, but that's because I have high expectations for a series that has delivered some of the most stellar games in video game history. Navigating through SR388 is still enjoyable, finding plenty of upgrades along the way. It's just that almost everything that is new isn't good. The original Metroid 2 had unique level design in that you entered an area, cleared it of Metroids, collected upgrades and then moved on to the next area. This core is still intact in the remake, but someone thought it would be a good idea to put in backtracking which led to the introduction of teleporters. What makes the design of Metroid so outstanding is that you can get around fast in late-game, so something like teleporters aren't even necessary. But here they are a necessity to at least somewhat reduce the tedious feeling you get from trying to collect 100% of the items.

After my first playthrough I was ready to hand Metroid: Samus Returns a 5 because it was such a letdown. But I gave the game another chance and got used to everything, including the use of the stupid melee attack. You get punished for trying to play well and kill enemies without melee, because they have a lot of health. But standing still, waiting for their attack and then using melee depletes almost all of their health and stuns them to be picked off with one or two shots. Much of my experience was better the second time around, however, collecting all items still sucked as much as before. In the end I am left with a game that feels a lot like Other M despite the mistakes that were made differing greatly. Other M might actually be the slightly better game because one of its biggest shortcomings (story) can be skipped on additional playthroughs.

Controls 10 The Circle Pad controls come with a trade-off: Good for aiming
while standing still, but lacking in precision for movement.
Gameplay   The typical 2D-Metroid gameplay is bogged down by too many
influences from 3D games that slow down the pace.
Story   Go to planet, eradicate threats, the end. Intros for new
enemy types are kept at a reasonable length.
Single-player   The original Metroid 2's level design doesn't gel with the
backtracking that is introduced in the remake.
Multiplayer   Not
available.
Graphics   Certainly looks nice, but it's not always a stable
experience. Too many framerate drops for my liking.
Sound   Most of the soundtrack lives off of remixes which aren't
particularly good. Arrangements blend together too much.
Value   The first any-percent playthrough lasts about eight hours.
Going for 100% adds another few hours.
Replay Value   Hard mode makes you take more damage, no other changes.
A 100% route is going to be tedious, no matter what.
Score 6 Not a Metroid game that will reignite the IP. Too many basic
mistakes make it an Other M that takes on a different form.


Legend11 correctly predicted that GTA IV (360+PS3) would outsell SSBB. I was wrong.

A Biased Review Reloaded / Open Your Eyes / Switch Shipments

Wow, that was honestly a fantastic review Rol! I've yet to pick up Samus Returns, but I enjoyed reading your perspective. Good, thorough review!